Editor's Note

Editor's Note

Games? Not so much. They are still dealing with the multi-layered system of publisher to distributor to store shelf to user. Seems awfully complicated. ... This week, we illuminate a few of the pitfalls of getting to market and some of the ingenious moves made to bypass those.

Editor's Note

Videogames are a modern art, but at their core, tell stories, just like the stone tablets of The Epic of Gilgamesh. The stories they tell range from brutally awful to heart-wrenchingly wonderful, just like all the stories told in all other media, and one wonders, thousands years from now, which of them will survive, and how will stories be told then?

Editor's Note

Nowadays, serious games aren't just about mass murder; serious games are about everything, from anthropological research to art exhibits to virtual nation building.

Editor's Note

Multiplayer games, to many, are the way of the future. As yet, massively multiplayer online games haven't quite broken into the consciousness of the everyday Joe. But perhaps it is just around the corner? The Escapist takes on massively multiplayer online games in this week's issue, "Raid!"

Editor's Note

How did they get there, we wondered, and who is on their way up right now? To attempt an answer, we present Issue 119 of The Escapist.

Chase Murdey interviews Tim Schafer, the LucasArts alum whose Psychonauts became a cult hit; Dana Massey profiles the company behind the Championship Manager games; Pat Miller looks at Mac mavens Ambrosia; and Shannon Drake spends some time with the twisted minds behind Postal.

Editor's Note

"October's a big sports month, a sports perfect storm. The baseball playoffs are in full swing. The football season is well underway, as is the hockey season. And pro basketball is over. That portion of my brain dedicated to stat tracking and backseat managing is firing up an electrical storm, and that current invariably makes its way to my gaming lizard brain. And I can't stop playing."

Editor's Note

This week's issue of The Escapist is all about jobs in the industry, but not quite what we usually think about as industry. There are many paths you may take, many niches you might fill; after all, games are rapidly outpacing other forms of entertainment. Join us this week as we discover and chat with some lucky and enterprising people who've found these paths and niches. Perhaps you'll be inspired.

Editor's Note

We're suckers for a great article, but we have designed, and love, our editorial calendar. It is the foundation upon which the whole of The Escapist is built. However, we have learned in our over two years of publishing The Escapist that sometimes it is best to have a little flexibility built into the mix.

It is this need for flexibility that has brought forth the recurring Editor's Choice issues you'll find scattered throughout the calendar. These issues, full of never-before-seen articles, are literally a mix of some of our favorite Homeless Articles over the last few months.

Editor's Note

Luckily, though, for you and for us, The Escapist continues on, regardless of the fitness of those who tend its wild growth. And as my head swims with a disease only a 14-day dose of Amoxicillin can cure, it's my pleasure to introduce to you issue 115, "Crowdsourcing to Victory," wherein we talk about Web 2.0 and its impact on gaming.

Editor's Note

"The importance of roleplay as a genre and as a game mechanic/play option leads us to this week's issue of The Escapist. Greg Tito discusses psychology experiments and how they might apply to how we choose to play games. Leigh Alexander explores the out-of-game roleplay based upon Final Fantasy VII. Nova Barlow shares with us how her inner roleplayer died. Russ Pitts dips a toe into the unusual waters of Sociolotron and the roleplay there. And Erin Hoffman is still searching for a true heroine with whom she can identify. Find these stories and more in this week's issue of The Escapist."

Editor's Note

On Career Day at Hill Elementary, Doug's father brought us each a shiny penny he'd salvaged from the vacuum bucket and handed around Tupperware containers of the various powdered chemicals he injected into the machine's hoppers each night, so that our mothers and fathers could drive by at their convenience and insert coins for the pleasure of spray washing their cars.

It was the beginning of a magical day, and it only got better from there. Ultimately I didn't follow any of the career paths presented to me that day, but I listened to each presentation with rapt attention, in awe of the many ways a person could make his or her way in this world.

This week, The Escapist presents its own Career Day.

Editor's Note

Hannibal Lecter. The Joker. Darth Vader. High fructose corn syrup. There's something about bad guys we love to hate - or maybe just love to love. Ever since there've been stories, there've been bad guys stealing the show from heroes. But why are the Lex Luthors of the world so much more fun than the Supermen?

Editor's Note

Editor's Note: Generation Why?

Editor's Note

Those of us deep in the trenches of videogame culture like to think of casual games as an aberration, a blight on the face of our seemingly bright future, an error in judgment on the part of those who play them, a "new" thing, bound to turn the tide of public opinion against us and our games, and ultimately end the world as we know it.

And yet, casual games are not new. Casual games are as old as the act of play, most games, in fact, falling into the category we believe we created to hold the objects of our disdain. Now that most people in the Western world use a computer for some part of their day, it only makes sense that they bring their ideas of play with them into the virtual world they inhabit. You'll find this and more in this issue of The Escapist, "The Future of Gaming."

Editor's Note

Editor's Note: Connecting the Dots