Editor's Note

Editor's Note

"Few of us haven't dreamed of sailing the seven seas in a stolen ship, casting off all bonds of lawfulness and responsibility to be the captain of a merry band of pirates, seeking romance and adventure wherever the wind may take us. Likewise, few of us haven't downloaded a song, copied a movie or bootlegged a game, taking our enjoyment without paying for the privilege. But most of us realize this is nothing but a dream. That the first star on the right will always be farther away than we can sail and that the X, more often than not, marks an empty hole in the ground. We realize that rules also apply to us, that stealing isn't a victimless crime and that the merry band of pirates will be just as likely to slit your throat as any one else's."

Editor's Note

"Self-awareness is understanding the concept of existing as an individual having thoughts feelings and ideas, and that those are separate from those of others around you. And from this self-awareness, the age old questions of identity were born: Who am I? Why am I?"

Editor's Note

"For many, religion and philosophy make the world a richer, more meaningful place. Others feel trapped by the social and emotional demands they place on a person. It might seem that religion and philosophies can play similar roles within a game world. And this week, it is this discussion, religion and philosophy and their role in videogames, in which the writers of The Escapist engage."

Editor's Note

The Objective: In this issue of The Escapist, "Launch Telemetry," our elite corps of writers analyze this round of the Great Console Wars. Please continue reading for the in-depth briefing. Enjoy!

Editor's Note

"So, if the purpose is to entertain, no matter the subject, why do games continuously get bigger and better and brighter and faster? Why are new features/graphics/hours and hours of gameplay added at questionable entertainment value? To push the limits. To utilize new technology. To challenge seasoned players. To please the hardcore.

"Developers are beginning to realize that this might be faulty logic. With more games being made every year, and each of those games, on average, costing more to make, pleasing first and foremost a rather small segment of the population that most people don't have time to be a part of (no matter how much they might like to), is less than fiscally responsible."

Editor's Note

"Because the human input into the entertainment experience is the novel half of games' fun equation, it often garners the most attention. The part where games reach out and touch our lives is so often ignored. Perhaps it's that the line between what we do in games and what games share with us is so vague. But those things are present ... what are they?"

Editor's Note

Editor's Note: Rainmakers

Editor's Note

It is these orphan articles that cause us the most difficulty. You see, we're suckers for a great article, but we have designed, and love, our editorial calendar. It is the foundation upon which the whole of The Escapist is built. However, we have learned in our first year of publishing The Escapist that sometimes it is best to have a little flexibility built into the mix.

Editor's Note

"But there is one giant who predates all of these, who from the very beginning was about bringing electronic games to the masses: Sega. Sega was founded originally as Standard Games, and soon became Service Games (Service Games ... Sega ... get it?), in 1940. Back then, their purpose was to bring arcade games to servicemen abroad."

Editor's Note

But what is it, really? We can put a neat little definition on it, but it gets us no closer to achieving it. We can point at things that have encouraged immersion in the past, but there's no guarantee it will work again. We can try to make a game that's pinnacle of immersive to all people at all times, but there's really no such thing.

Why?

Editor's Note

And so, here we are, nearly two years into the magazine's life, and by the hand of Julianne's writer's block and illness, I was tapped to speak directly to you, to tell you how I got here. And it was easy; all I had to do was not party in Mexico. Jesus, what were the odds of that?

Editor's Note

"When I was thinking about what to write for this Editor's Note on serious videogames, I had originally thought to discuss the universal trend of new media evolution from humorous and fanciful to serious. And to make sure that I was correct in my assumption and to find supporting facts, I went digging for the first TV show, the first motion picture and called to mind what I knew of early stage productions in ancient Greece. In so doing, I found that my assumption was less than correct."

Editor's Note

Editor's Note: Silver Screen, Gold Disc

Editor's Note

Ed Note

Editor's Note

Where's My Flying Car?