Editor's Note

Editor's Note

We've decided to roll back the clocks and pages a bit and bring you a "Best of The Escapist" issue. We've pondered, hemmed and hawed, and thrown tantrums, but yes, we have decided on six of what we feel are some of the tastiest bits of journalism to come across our desktops for the past few months. Read on and enjoy.

Editor's Note

"Sure, at its worst, it's extremely annoying and rather intrusive. And these days, I do believe the whole thing's gotten a bit out of hand; the day we started attempting to sell things to people just trying to use the restroom in the train station is the day we crossed into the absurd." - Julianne Greer, Editor's Note, Issue 62

Editor's Note

"I think games are growing in significance to society everyday. As such, we try to cover games, and the stories and people behind them, in a way that befits this importance, and encourage others to do the same. I believe it's an important mission, worth the commitment it demands."

Editor's Note

"We're suckers for a great article, but we have built, and love, our editorial calendar. It is the foundation upon which the whole of The Escapist is built. However, we have learned in our first year of publishing The Escapist that sometimes it is best to have a little flexibility built into the mix ..." Editor's Note, Issue 60

Editor's Note

"The ancient Chinese proverb, most often attributed to Confucius, 'I hear, I forget; I see, I remember; I do, I understand' is never more demonstrable than in educational play. Children are more likely to respond to a lesson taught through fun than through lecture, it is their nature." - From "Editor's Note," Issue 59.

Editor's Note

We came across Ubisoft. We paused. Several said, "Why?" Well, because they're huge. And, well, I don't know anything about them. How does that happen? Who is Ubisoft, anyway? Our interest was piqued, and so, hoping we weren't cats, we ran with the curiosity.

Editor's Note

All of us who play games or have played games have experienced immersion to one degree or another. It's like getting lost in your own private world, and is the reason many of us game. In this week's issue of The Escapist, "In Too Deep," we explore both the good and bad sides of digital escapism.

Editor's Note

Gaming is supposed to be fun. It's supposed to be a diversion, a pastime, an escape. But sometimes it isn't. Sometimes we bring our problems, our anxieties and our fears with us from the real world into the virtual world, and then our escape becomes another day in the life ...

Editor's Note

In this issue of The Escapist, "Against the Gods," we take a look at the stories of a few, brave souls in the game industry who, for better or worse, decided that they were destined to make their dreams a reality. Some actually succeeded, while others crashed and burned.

Editor's Note

Space has traditionally been anything but the final frontier in gaming. Our contributors this week explore the lasting impact of the outer space setting on gaming, and how the cold, sterile emptiness of the void became the birthing place of a million dreams ... "In Spaaace!"

Editor's Note

It all started over a year ago, on a bar napkin. That's the story of The Escapist anyway. The story of gaming begins even further back than that and (we all hope) will continue far into the future.

In "2020 Redux" we once again visit the year 2020 to speculate on the possibilities of gaming's future.

Editor's Note

What happens when that which is supposed to break boredom becomes boring itself? And why does it always seem to happen? Our authors explore the phenomenon of drudgery in games in this week's issue of The Escapist: Where There's a Whip.

Editor's Note

Editor's Note: It Came From The Escapist

Editor's Note

A top game industry executive who happens to be a woman; a tale of a female-friendly company (which has since fallen on hard times); a look at how little girls could be the salvation of the industry and a premise that the whole topic of girls in games is nothing but smoke and mirrors. The Escapist revisits the subject of women in games.

Editor's Note

Just as in other areas of the world economy, China is flying to the top of the ranks of consumers and producers of games. While we don't see the effects of this growth quite yet, we soon will. Our authors look at the rise of a new power in the gaming world in this week's issue of The Escapist: New China.