Featured Articles

Anti/Villain

The final boss of a platformer may be easily defeated while the combined pits, spikes and wall-traps leading to his chamber are stained with the blood of a hundred reloads. Kevin Hoole explains how the environment can be the harshest villain in videogames.

Anti/Villain

With the medium's special limitations, making an effective villain is hard to do in videogames. Richard Dansky is a master at the craft and he imparts his villainous wisdom on how to create the perfect adversary for the player.

Happy Anniversary

Many industry insiders thought that it wouldn't work, including some of its contributors. Allen Varney eats his words as he speaks to the founders of The Escapist and learns the history of the magazine and what has made it the mouthpiece of the gaming generation.

Happy Anniversary

LoadingReadyRun has been creating comedy since before this console generation began and YouTube was a twinkle in anyone's eye. Nick Halme travelled to Victoria, British Columbia to visit with Graham, Paul and the rest of the gang to find out just what makes the LRR comedy factory work.

Happy Anniversary

Find out everything about The Escapist staff that you've always wanted to know. Who's married? Just who has been faking that Funk? And what is it with ponies?

Happy Anniversary

Remember those overly verbose criticisms that you were forced to read in college, written by intellectuals who used 10 cent words just because they could? Max Steele has taken that style and applied it to something that really matters: Yahtzee's Zero Punctuation reviews.

Constructive Criticism

Kieron Gillen's New Games Journalism manifesto sparked a debate about how we write about the games that we love. Alasdair Stuart checks in with Gillen six years after he wrote that we should be "Travel Journalists to Imaginary places."

Constructive Criticism

Searching Google for a game review is like using a hatchet when you need a scalpel. Chuck Wendig prefers sending a query to the trusted hive mind that is his Twitter followers.

Constructive Criticism

A writer blasted reviews for over-hyping titles and giving too much credit to works that were just tripe. Peter Parrish proves that what George Orwell argued in 1936 for the novel is just as relevant to videogame reviews today.

Constructive Criticism

Many sources review games based purely on how "bad" they are and don't care whether they are any fun. Fintan Monaghan examines a few of the websites and censor boards that describe the level of sex, violence and magic in games.

Best of

The courtrooms and investigations portrayed in the Phoenix Wright series may seem cartoonish or over-the-top, but, as Fintan Monaghan shows us, they accurately criticize the faults of the Japanese legal system and the series may actually bring about legal reform.

Best of

Videogames have long been characterized by the mainstream as an adolescent medium, played by stunted males who have trouble associating with the opposite sex. Those who play games might scoff, but is there actually a fear of the feminine within the content? Michael Thomsen takes a scholarly look into the accusations of vaginophobia.

Best of

Guns and games typically only come up in the same news story when it involves a horrific act of violence. But what about all the responsible enthusiasts out there who simply want to enjoy their favorite pastimes? Russ Pitts speaks with gamers and gun owners about their dual hobbies.

Best of

The success of a game now seems to hinge on how "addictive" it is, not just whether a game is fun. Rob Zacny ponders whether the trend of such manipulative gameplay is ethical.

The Day After

The romance of the breakdown of society that Armageddon provides is that the social order would be reset and the downtrodden could become heroes. Nick Halme posits that each game that we play creates our own private apocalypse.