Featured Articles

Everyday Gamer

All gamers have a desire to play videogames, but, for someone with obsessive-compulsive disorder, that desire becomes need. Michael Comeau relates how he discovered that his gaming was just another symptom of his OCD.

Everyday Gamer

What happens when two people who met via the internet suddenly find themselves cohabitating in matrimony? After a brief period of adjustment, Amanda Yesilbas and her new husband bonded by playing games together.

Everyday Gamer

People play games for different reasons. Logan Westbrook tells us why the story is the most important aspect of games for him and how he doesn't care if that means he has to run down the difficulty slider.

Everyday Gamer

Any self-respecting parent usually limits the TV and gaming time of spawn in the early years of their lifecycle. Mur Lafferty wonders if the limits that she places on her own geek daughter have merit for her own intellectual development.

Editor's Choice

The games industry refers to the "Western" and "Eastern" markets, which roughly breaks down to U.S. and Japan respectively, but the rest of the world is often overlooked. Michael Thomsen reminds us how the Third World plays games.

Editor's Choice

You'd think that an addiction counselor would be the last person to get hooked on World of Warcraft, but that's exactly what happened to Mark Kline.

Editor's Choice

It was hard to play videogames as a Québécois before they were localized into French, but Remi Savard taught himself English in order to play Final Fantasy and loved it. When the industry began translating games into his mother tongue, however, there was something lost in translation.

Editor's Choice

The courtrooms and investigations portrayed in the Phoenix Wright series may seem cartoonish or over-the-top, but, as Fintan Monaghan shows us, they accurately criticize the faults of the Japanese legal system and the series may actually bring about legal reform.

The Way of the Future

Suffering from a concussion, the noted designer of Alternate Reality Games tested her theories by turning her own recovery into a game. In this profile, Allen Varney expresses why Jane McGonigal could be the first game designer nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Way of the Future

The term "gamer" sets us apart, as if those who consume games are somehow different than everyone else. Jason Della Rocca argues that as gameplay infects almost every facet of our lives, gamers will no longer be a cultural subset, but that our society as a whole will be gamers.

The Way of the Future

Games are not "in their infancy" nor will they be "coming of age" anytime soon. If an age metaphor is necessary, gaming is already an adult and Brendan Main says that it's up to us to decide what that means.

The Way of the Future

Film is often identified as the medium that videogames most wants to be like, in terms of cultural importance. Alice Bonasio argues that in order to shut up critics like Roger Ebert, the gaming industry needs to examine both its own history and that of its closest counterpart.

Uphill, Both Ways

There are two competing factions of the Gygax family who disagree on how to properly memorialize the life and work of the inventor of D&D. Somehow both groups have lost sight of the fact that, as Allen Varney explains, the entire roleplaying industry is his memorial.

Uphill, Both Ways

A folly is the term for a building that is built purely for decoration and is usually ostentatious in style and design in order to attract viewers or tourists. Ryan Lambie believes that the videogames of today are merely modern follies.

Uphill, Both Ways

Much has changed since the early days of gaming, not the least of which is an increasing lack of feeling like you were playing something weird and wholly alien. John Constantine examines this phenomenon by contrasting the releases of the first Mega Man and Mega Man 10.