Featured Articles

Editor's Choice

Games have evolved a lot in the last century or so, but evolution doesn't always mean progress. Jeff Tidball offers a broad look at roleplaying games, and explains why some of the genre's most fundamental mechanics may be holding designers back.

Editor's Choice

You've heard of Method Acting, whereby an actor attempts to "get into" a role by living as the subject he wishes to portray. But did you know it can work for game development as well? James Portnow explains the little known art of Method Design and how a trip to the firing range can help you make a better shooter.

Editor's Choice

The customer service team at EA Mythic had it all - catered lunches, Rock Band-filled break rooms and logo-stamped coffee mugs. But sliding subscription numbers and a slumping economy meant the good times wouldn't last. Jeremy Monken recounts his time as a GM for Warhammer Online: Age of Reckoning.

Editor's Choice

The age of Magic: The Gathering may be coming to an end if one upstart game designer's meteoric rise continues. Allen Varney looks at Donald X. Vaccarino's debut card game, Dominion, and how it's taking over the genre one gaming group at a time.

Alternative Access

Is the Age of the Console about to come to a close? According to three prominent game industry executives, all signs point to "yes." Ray Huling looks at how streaming technologies could usher in a new era of gaming.

Alternative Access

In the war for the hearts and minds of videogame enthusiasts, Sony and Microsoft have increasingly turned their attention to the battleground of online services. But while their objective of living-room supremacy may be the same, their strategies are remarkably different. Tom Endo interviews the directors of Xbox Live and the PlayStation Network about their services' competing philosophies.

Alternative Access

Digital distribution may offer a lot of convenience to gamers who want to expand their collections without leaving the house. But if you care about getting as much value as possible from your games, you may want to proceed with caution. Michael Comeau explains why direct downloads aren't all they're cracked up to be.

Alternative Access

What started as a simple experiment for a small independent strategy game developer has turned into a new way for people to purchase and play games. Christos Reid speaks with the founders of GamersGate about the company's growth in the online gaming space.

Digital Doggie Biscuit

Plenty of pet simulators let players train and play with a virtual companion, but they rarely attempt to portray the deep bond that can form between people and their pets. Austin Price looks at one of the few that does: Squaresoft's Secret of Evermore.

Digital Doggie Biscuit

Perhaps no character in the Fallout universe is as beloved by players as Dogmeat, the canine companion to every Lone Wanderer to leave (or be thrown out of) his vault. Michael Fiegel interviews members of the original Fallout development team about how the loveable mutt came into being.

Digital Doggie Biscuit

How do you make sure your pet Pikachu gets enough exercise when you can barely move yourself? Simple: Get the whole household involved. Brendan Sears and his family learn that it takes a village to raise a Pokémon.

Digital Doggie Biscuit

Brendan Main has killed thousands of faceless enemies during his videogame career. But the one he remembers most wasn't an enemy at all. Main ponders the meaning behind his propensity for virtual goat-slaying.

e-volution

Game designers have constantly tried to make the learning process in games as fun and painless as possible. But the better games have gotten at teaching players their mechanics, the less patience players have for instruction. Rob Zacny looks back at how evolving gaming instruction methods have allowed some genres to flourish while others faded into obscurity.

e-volution

The winking-pixel simplicity of the first Street Fighter and Final Fantasy games may seem primitive compared to the elaborate production values and blockbuster status of recent installments in the series. But as Leigh Alexander recalls it, a healthy dose of imagination was all it took to fill in the gaps.

e-volution

If videogame publishers want to extend their reach beyond the standard 18- to 34-year-old male demographic, they may want to form development teams with fewer gamers and more romance novelists. Colin Rowsell exhorts game developers to inject some fresh ideas into the design process.