Featured Articles

e-volution

Hardcore gamers have been clamoring for mainstream recognition of their favorite hobby for nearly 30 years. But they've missed an important point: Being accepted by mainstream audiences means accepting mainstream audiences themselves. Russ Pitts surveys the changing gamer landscape and charts a new path forward for mainstream and hardcore alike.

Declaration of Independence

In the battle for the time and attention of the gaming public, the odds are pretty stacked against the little guys. But indie developers may have a crucial advantage over the majors: the ability to explore new gameplay ideas in a matter of hours, not months. Jordan Deam speaks with the Experimental Gameplay Project's Kyle Gabler and Kyle Gray about the benefits of rapid prototyping.

Declaration of Independence

Greg Costikyan famously called for a revolution in the game industry at the 2005 Game Developers Conference. But when he tried to lead the charge with his own online games portal, he quickly found himself on the sidelines. Jared Newman investigates the closure of Manifesto Games.

Declaration of Independence

As indie gaming has exploded in growth over the past few years, so too have the identity defining questions confronting this nascent movement. Have indie developers exploited a clever hole in the market? Or are they artists dedicated to the ethos of indie through thick and thin?

Declaration of Independence

One of the most astonishingly innovative games of the last year is also one of the most unassuming. Anthony Burch sings the praises of Derek Yu's Spelunky.

Canadian Makin'

It's not unusual for companies in large industries to have competing corporate cultures that isolate themselves from each other. But one organization aims to break down those barriers for Vancouver's game development community. Murray Chu looks at the Artery and how it's helping local artists and designers stay connected.

Canadian Makin'

Few game developers boast a resume like Don Mattrick's: Co-founder of one of the first game studios in Canada, President of Electronic Arts and Senior Vice President of Microsoft's Entertainment and Devices division. But on a more local level, Mattrick may have singlehandedly turned Vancouver into one of the foremost game development hubs in the world.

Canadian Makin'

Canada is home to nearly 250 game studios, employing upwards of 15,000 people. But some in the industry feel their country doesn't get the credit it deserves from the gaming media. Nicole Tanner speaks with a few developers about the past, present and future of the Canadian games industry.

Canadian Makin'

Canada's videogame industry is the third largest in the world, trailing only behind those of the U.S. and Japan. Yet the friendly, soft-spoken nation is under increasing pressure from its southern neighbor to conform to stricter standards of piracy prevention. Andy Chalk examines whether the U.S.'s heated rhetoric is enough to melt through the hardy igloo of Canadian resistance to copyright reform.

Frustration Nation

The Escapist staff vents about their most frustrating gaming moments.

Frustration Nation

Sometimes, the only thing better than a flawless victory is an agonizing defeat. Lee Petrie examines the allure of the Last Stand in both videogames and the culture at large.

Frustration Nation

Plenty of developers talk about promoting more visceral reactions in their audience, but they probably didn't have headaches and nausea in mind. Nova Barlow explains the plight of gamers who suffer from Virtual Simulator Sickness.

Frustration Nation

How long do you have to play a game until you feel like you've sufficiently mastered it? If your answer can be measured in hours or days, chances are you're not a speedrunner. Danielle Riendeau investigates the obsessive world of competitive speedrunning.

Frustration Nation

Ever feel like game designers might be coddling players a little too much? Then you probably haven't played a game by Mark Essen, aka "messhof." John Adkins speaks with the indie designer about his punishing, occasionally nauseating but always interesting game design philosophies.

Editor's Choice

Free play - the act of playing without any structure or organization - is an important part of every child's development. But what if you want to introduce your child to gaming? Filamena Young thinks up a different kind of ruleset to nurture both her daughter's creativity and her interest in roleplaying.