Featured Articles

Editor's Choice

In the days of Steam, Xbox Live and the PlayStation Network, it's easy to lose sight of what multiplayer used to be: you and a few of your buddies laughing and trading insults from across the room. Sam Machkovech catalogs the rise and fall of local multiplayer gaming.

Editor's Choice

Maintaining a happy marriage requires plenty of time, energy and emotional dexterity. But Lara Crigger has found that a shared love of videogames doesn't hurt, either.

Editor's Choice

There might not be much overlap between amateur mycologists (mushroom hunters) and gamers, but that didn't stop Bethesda from lavishing detail on Oblivion's fungi. Zach Miller goes on a virtual foray through the forests of Tamriel and compares it to the real deal.

Parting the Digital Sea

The Thief series is well known for its convincing and immersive gaming world. To achieve this feat the developers hinged the series on a religious conflict that plays no small part in driving players forward in the game. One thing's for sure, religious fanatics have never been more interesting.

Parting the Digital Sea

Christian missionaries famously spread the word of God as new frontiers and people were discovered. Little has changed since then, even though the frontiers are now virtual and the people are now players in these new worlds.

Parting the Digital Sea

Religion and videogames mix like oil and water, with religious principles usually being tacked onto an ill-suited game design. However, one church Youth Director and Pastor in training sees a better way forward. He also happens to be a serious Call of Duty 4 player.

Parting the Digital Sea

When Dale Culp learned his church's pastor was a fan of Doom, he was shocked. But as more and more people identify themselves as "gamers," why shouldn't a man of God enjoy shooting virtual Nazis in the face?

Parting the Digital Sea

One of the most venerable series in gaming, Civilization, has dealt with religion in every installment. However, the way the game has incorporated it into the gameplay has varied greatly with each game. Alan Au spoke with several key people involved with the series to illuminate the role of religion in Civilization.

Gin, Juice and Videogames

Hip hop's concerns with sex, drugs and violence are no secret to anyone, but what about its love of videogames, comic books and cult movies? The fascination with geek culture has always been there. The latest incarnation of this is hip hop artist Charles Hamilton who, with his interest in Sonic, is taking that obsession to a whole new Zone.

Gin, Juice and Videogames

Hip hop and games have crossed paths more than a few times in the last 20 years, but the true integration of rap and videogames may be yet to come. Matt Yeomans details the history of collaboration between the two media.

Gin, Juice and Videogames

Fans of rock and pop music have literally dozens of rhythm games to choose from. So why have music games left hip hop out in the cold? Darius Kazemi looks at the design problems involved with creating a compelling hip hop music game and how the right developer could solve them.

Gin, Juice and Videogames

Forget 50 Cent: Blood on the Sand. Hip hop and videogames have had a longer and more meaningful relationship than recent crossovers would lead you to believe. Brian Rowe analyzes how the hip hop culture and aesthetic has made its way into some pretty diverse titles.

Gin, Juice and Videogames

Hip hop artists usually rhyme about what they know, whether it's the neighborhood they grew up in or their favorite Mega Man boss. Nathan Meunier examines how videogames have influenced the culture of nerdcore rappers.

The New School

Can Civ IV teach you about Central American history? Or World of Warcraft improve your German? If Dickinson College's course offerings are any indication, they can. Todd Bryant examines how he and his employer are integrating games into their college classrooms with encouraging results.

The New School

After a failed attempt at teaching game design through Counter-Strike mods, one UC Berkeley teacher learned that the best way to engage his students was also the most primitive. Robert Yang recounts how playing outside helped his students learn the fundamentals of game design.