Featured Articles

The New School

You're probably used to blowing up gas stations in videogames - but what if it was your job to save them? Robert Janelle plays Response Ready and speaks with developer Distil Interactive about how games can help train employees to perform better at their jobs.

The New School

Can a bunch of teenagers really impact the world of games development? The answer, according to Dean Reilly, is a resounding "Yes!"

The New School

"I have no respect for people who teach in a game program who haven't worked in the industry." That's a sentiment you'll hear a lot from game developers, but it's based on a set of assumptions that aren't necessarily all true. Brenda Brathwaite looks at the conflict between the industry and the academy, and finds some common ground between both factions.

Fiction 4

Dan thought he was willing to do anything for a job at his favorite game studio, Explosive Entertainment. But that was before he was subjected to the most excruciating final interview he had ever experienced. Kevin Spiess pores over every detail of Dan's Explosive interview.

Fiction 4

If you work in quality assurance, you're spending half your life in a game. But what if you lost track of the other half? Jennifer Estaris gives us a portrait of Myra, a game developer who takes her job a little too seriously.

Fiction 4

What do MMOG characters do when they're not under players' command? In Richard Hehemann's estimation, they gather together to seek comfort from a cruel, uncaring world they can neither control nor understand.
Brandic stood in the doorway of a small room, filled with chairs arrayed in a circle. He was about to enter when he heard a man - a barbarian fighter by the looks of him - speak.

Fiction 4

Sometimes it's hard to tell when a game stops being a game. But when you start bludgeoning your opponent with a 360 controller, you've probably crossed that line. Seth Able tells the story of a Street Fighter rivalry that becomes dangerously real.

Best Of

What do medieval Japanese warriors and giant fighting robots have in common? Probably a lot more than you think. Ollie Barder examines the influence of samurai on mecha, and how that influence has led to a particularly unique genre of videogames.

Best Of

Piracy in the U.S. and Europe usually takes place behind closed doors. But in Brazil, it's wide out in the open for everyone to see. Pedro Franco examines the state of the gaming economy in his home country and how the situation got to be so dire.

Best Of

Progressive parents have long known that videogames are a great motivator in their kids' lives. But for Jamie Dunston and her son Pearce, gaming is much more than that: It's a way for her to help him overcome some of the most difficult challenges posed by autism.

Best Of

Game developers don't shy away from World War II's bloodiest battles when looking for inspiration, but they've skipped over one of the most significant events of that era: the Holocaust. Emanuel Maiberg ponders the long-term impact of this error of omission.

Best Of

We've all played videogames to temporarily escape from reality, but who knew that games could be an effective medical treatment for chronic pain? Rob Zacny explores the psychology of pain therapy.

Good Griefing

Members of The Escapist Staff fess up about their experiences with griefing.

Good Griefing

It's easy to complain about griefers when they catch you in the last leg of a half-hour-long quest, but they provide a valuable service: They add some much needed spontaneity to experiences that would otherwise feel pretty routine. Brett Staebell recounts his World of Warcraft guild's maritime griefing efforts, and how their victims actually appreciated the ordeal.

Good Griefing

In a rush to ban griefers from their online worlds, MMOG operators may be passing up a golden opportunity: to harness griefers' collective ill intent and apply it toward the greater good. Allen Varney speculates whether creative game design can turn griefers against themselves.