Featured Articles

Good Griefing

The Reconstruction Era had Jesse James. The Great Depression had Bonnie & Clyde. The Internet Era has ... GoonSwarm? Tom Endo looks at today's griefers from a historical perspective and wonders whether they might fulfill the same societal functions as the legendary outlaws of yesteryear.

Good Griefing

Do pacifists have any place in Counter-Strike? Have online games become the new City Hall steps? Could the next Million Man March be in a virtual world? James McGrath talks to a pair of in-game protesters about anti-war griefing in online games.

Press-tige

These days, gaming publications are increasingly reliant on videogame publishers to advertise on their sites. But with the audience for videogames growing by the day, why haven't other brands taken advantage of these venues? Rob Zacny speaks with advertisers and game journalists about why endemic advertising isn't going away anytime soon.

Press-tige

The web may have reinvented the way we write about games, but one format continues to dominate the conversation: the top ten list. Sam Machkovech catalogues ten reasons of his own why lists are so popular - and why that may not be such a bad thing after all.

Press-tige

As a reviewer, Justin Leeper was often a harsh critic of the games that crossed his desk. But when he took a position as a designer for THQ's latest WWE SmackDown game, he gained new insight into the development process - and learned what makes a good game review along the way.

Press-tige

Newspaper coverage of psychological studies on the effects of violent videogames has become the primary ammunition in a widespread cultural conflict. But it might surprise you how little thought and effort actually go into these reports. Chris LaVigne exposes the limitations of traditional news outlets' coverage of the social sciences by going straight to the source: the researchers themselves.

Press-tige

Joseph Pulitzer was both a pioneer of many sensationalist journalistic practices and the founder of one of the most prestigious awards in the industry. What would this conflicted figure think about the current state of game journalism? Richard Aihoshi ponders that question and comes up with a few more of his own.

Editor's Choice

Unlike those of film and television, videogame awards shows can seem pretty out of touch with both the industry they recognize and the consumers they represent. But that may all be about to change. Alice Bonasio speaks with three winners of 2009 Video Game BAFTAs about what their awards mean to them and to the industry at large.

Editor's Choice

Many parents are concerned that too much electronic entertainment will turn their children into depressed loners who spend all their time on the couch. But is there really an association between depression, TV watching and videogame playing? Gavin Nachbar looks at two recent studies of adolescents' gaming habits and what they mean for the future of the medium.

Editor's Choice

It doesn't take much to make a passionate community of fans self-destruct, especially when oversized egos are involved. Dan Squire offers a cautionary tale of two videogame music fan sites that competed for the attention of the same group of users - and both lost.

Editor's Choice

There are plenty of internet communities dedicated to videogame characters, but few are as discomforting as Silent Hill's Pyramid Head. Samantha Xu speaks with Pyramid Head fangirls and academics about what it means to fantasize about a fictional murderer and serial rapist.

Editor's Choice

Many industry analysts have declared videogames recession proof, but why have so many studios suffered from cutbacks, layoffs and bankruptcies in the last year? Ray Huling looks at the economic forces shaping the games industry through the lens of TempleCon, a New England gaming convention that aims to broaden its audience and their tastes.

God Save the Queen

While many game developers are primarily concerned with staying afloat until their next game ships, it pays to have a broader outlook. Wendy Despain speaks with International Hobo's Chris Bateman about the past and future of the U.K. games industry.

God Save the Queen

Dean Reilly talks to one of the founding fathers of British game development, David Braben, about reaching audiences, how bedroom programmers revolutionized the industry and what it's like to create a legendary game.

God Save the Queen

Many in the U.K. games industry have pointed to tax breaks as a silver-bullet solution to staying competitive in a global economy. But this approach might have a few problems of its own. Jason Della Rocca speaks with industry experts from across the U.K. to get their perspectives on the issue.