Featured Articles

The Answer to Everything

The Eastern European regions are a rising force in gaming, both as developers and as an audience. Laura Bularca, a Romanian herself, discusses what it's like to be a gamer in Romania, and why it's important.

The Answer to Everything

"The game ticks all the boxes required by the arthouse games movement: innovative gameplay with a fresh slant on an old genre, an original graphical approach and a sophisticated, adult story and theme. So why isn't it better known?" Nick Bousfield looks at Jordan Mechner's 1997 masterpiece, The Last Express.

The Answer to Everything

"The revolution didn't begin with Pong, and the game explosion isn't limited to digital media." Greg Costikyan looks at the evolution of game design innovation, and where you think the next evolution in games will come from.

The Answer to Everything

From the founding of Origin to the rise of NCsoft in the western world, Richard and Robert Garriott have been at the forefront of the games industry since its inception. Shannon Drake and Julianne Greer sit down with the masterminds to discuss the future of online gaming.

Can a Game Make You Cry?

"This week's titular question is obviously a silly one. Answer: Yes. Next issue please!" John Walker explains why games can and should make you cry.

Can a Game Make You Cry?

"No longer satisfied with knowing how we can interact with a game, we want to know how a game will interact with us. Newly empowered, we've turned the spotlight on a type of reverse interactivity. Our real-world reactions become linked with our actions in-game, and vice versa. A whole new dichotomy - or at least our awareness of one - has been born." Bonnie Ruberg talks about New Games Journalism.

Can a Game Make You Cry?

"The benchmark of a good film or book - for me - is if it evokes some kind of emotion. As an industry, we've got excitement down. It's time to rethink some basic assumptions if we ever hope to grow beyond that." Dana Massey looks at a wider gaming experience.

Can a Game Make You Cry?

"Just as a poem doesn't need pictures and a painting doesn't need music, a game needs nothing else apart from its rules to succeed as a work of art." Rob Humble looks at the artistic aspects of game rule design.

Can a Game Make You Cry?

There are always certain games brought up, even certain scenes, when the topic of emotion comes into play. Most of these games have set, scripted plots, which make storytelling easier. Mark Wallace looks at emotion in the games with less restrictions.

Can a Game Make You Cry?

In their thirty years of existance, Boston has released a score of platinum albums and dozens of popular songs. Kieron Gillen explains why he thinks Boston is also one of the top ten videogame level designers of all time, and explores the sleeper hit that is Guitar Hero.

Dungeons & Dollars

"Let me regale you with the true story of a game based on a license." Dana Massey looks at the circumstances that create the modern licensed video game.

Dungeons & Dollars

Is the community that makes games seems disconnected from the people who play games? Pat Miller talks to "Marvelous" and "TheeTriforceGameMaster" about Empire Arcadia, their New York-based gaming posse turned corporate.

Dungeons & Dollars

It's fairly well known that, as a whole, the game industry is prety immature on several levels. Jason Della Rocca discusses how immature production practices and poor quality of life are bankrupting the game industry.

Dungeons & Dollars

In the fourth and final part of Warren Spector's sries on the state of the games industry, he discusses what is needed to break out of the best/worst trap.

Dungeons & Dollars

Even if you don't shop there, or even live near one, the retail giant Wal-Mart has probably affected your life in some way. Allen Varney discusses the Wal-Mart Effect on the gaming industry, and how parts of the industry are trying to break free.