Featured Articles

The Virtual Coffeeshop

"This hero strides a wasteland, a strange world where a teenager or a government commando is the only person with a brain or willpower, and where the entire world is against him." Shannon Drake rails against the lack of compelling protagonists.

The Virtual Coffeeshop

Religion is always a touchy subject to approach, in any art form, but there's no denying it has a profound impact on all of them. Khurram Ahmed discusses religion and videogames.

The Virtual Coffeeshop

"It is the responsibility of society as a whole to make sure future generations, not just stuffy historians at the local college, remember the past. Yet, doing so requires they want to learn, and that is why I look to the entertainment industry to pass along this knowledge to the masses." Dana Massey discusses preserving history through games.

The Virtual Coffeeshop

"Most game designers would balk at the term 'interactive drama,' off handedly dismissing the possibility of virtual characters and social gameplay as being contrary to the nature of computers." Patrick Dugan looks at Fa

The Virtual Coffeeshop

Beneath the stealth action of Hideo Kojima's genre-defining series lurks a message that many gamers probably never notice. Pat Miller explains how gameplay can be used to convey messages in ways that other media can't.

The Virtual Coffeeshop

Some of the world's commentators say videogames are either incapable of having meaning, or are only now reaching that stage. John Szczepaniak disagrees, providing examples from gaming history.

For Great Justice!

Though common in tabletop role-playing, playing a supporting role was never a major focus for video games until online multiplayer became popular. John Walker tells us why he's no longer going to be one of those supporting roles, a healer in an MMOG.

For Great Justice!

Even when every game mechanic is designed against it, there are still occasions when gamers would rather be social. Mark Wallace narrates one of these occasions, a personal experience from World of Warcraft.

For Great Justice!

"Ever since the first RPG was made, computer and videogames have been sorely lacking in well developed characters." Spanner looks at characterization in gaming, with a heavy dose of Spider-Man for good measure.

For Great Justice!

There's an online community out there based around gaming bargains. Unlike many other bargain-based communities, this one isn't about turning a quick buck on eBay, but about experiencing games and gaming. Pat Miller talks with David "CheapyD" Abrams, founder of Cheap Ass Gamer.

For Great Justice!

"Gamers exist in communities. Whether we're grouped by the faction we're a part of, the server we play on, the game we play, the genre of game we play - or some combination thereof - we exist as part of a community." Shawn Williams tells us how gamers and their virtual communities have provided support that his local ones could not.

For Great Justice!

It sometimes comes as a surprise when people find out the same guys who run a comic featuring a drunken DivX player and a juicer with a lust for the flesh of virgin oranges also happen to be the founders of a children's charity. Shannon Drake talks with Penny Arcade about Child's Play.

I Can Stop Playing Whenever I Want

As a hobby, gaming isn't much more addictive than others, though gamers take more pleasure in the obsession. Sometimes this can be a bad thing. Brian Easton asks: Are you doing it for the pleasure of the game, or the distaste of something else?

I Can Stop Playing Whenever I Want

"Bang! You've been shot in the arm, but it doesn't hurt. Bang! You've been shot in the head, but you're not really dead." Bonnie Ruberg looks at how pain and gaming relate to each other.

I Can Stop Playing Whenever I Want

"Ladies and gentlemen, readers and fellow writers: I have an admission to make. I am a recovering A Tale in the Desert addict." Laura Genender looks at how ATITD inspires obsession, addiction, and burnout.