Featured Articles

The Home Invasion

The 360 is here, ushering in the next generation of games and gamers. For some, it will be their Commodore, their 2600, their Nintendo. Joe Blancato looks at what the expanding industry means to the current generation of gamers.

The Home Invasion

The classroom is changing. Chalkboards and overhead projectors have been replaced by PowerPoint presentations, film strips have been replaced by videos, DVDs and movies. Jon Wood discusses the value videogames can have in the classroom.

The Home Invasion

Sex, in one form or another, permeates all videogame genres. It's an important part of human relations, of life, of storytelling, and as such, it's an important part of games. Bonnie Ruberg takes a look at videogames, pornography, and the question of interactivity.

The Home Invasion

In 1899, economist Thorstein Veblen wrote that most of the economic activity in a modern society is little more than individuals attempting to distinguish themselves from one another. Mark Wallace discusses gaming as the new leisure class.

The Home Invasion

In the next two centuries, roleplaying ideas will transform society. Game designers can help. Allen Varney predicts the day when imminent ubiquitous net allows reputation to abstract relationships in the same way money abstracts labor.

Generation G

With some help from his 13-year-old niece Alex, Spanner gives us a run down of the best games to help old people get back in touch with the gaming scene and for whippersnappers to learn about games the way they used to be.

Generation G

Introducing a gaming system into a household with children can have a number of effects. Dana Massey did just this, and relates how a Gamecube gifted to his much-younger brothers brought them closer together.

Generation G

When visually impressive, expansive 3-D marvels consistently failed to capture his niece's interest, Spanner realized all was not well with the industry. Through his experiences introducing her to the past, he relates what he sees as critical to the next generation.

Generation G

Most 41-year-old men have respectable hobbies - ones that involve doing lots of sweaty yard work, building birdhouses or coaching little-league football. Glenn Jarrell relates his experiences as a videogame junkie where gaming isn't considered respectable.

Generation G

Mom, Dad, and three kids share the same WoW guild. Why don't we hear more about them? Allen Varney explores how gaming should be used as both a parenting tool and a bonding experience, and not as a scapegoat.

Griefer Nation

Allen Varney writes in "Real World Grief" about the world's original griefers, those who ruined peoples' days long before games became the medium of choice.

Griefer Nation

Shannon Drake is a "Jerk on the Internet," and he's happy to tell you all about it. From the mind of the enemy, to your copy of The Escapist, for your reading pleasure.

Griefer Nation

In "Griefing for the Greater Good," Laura Genender writes about A Tale in the Desert anti-hero Mafia, who used age-old strong arm tactics in an attempt to stamp out greater in-game corruption.

Griefer Nation

Jim Rossignol explores EVE Online, and relates two epic stories of intrigue and betrayal in "A Deadly Dollar."

Griefer Nation

Greg Tito ran into a bully in World of Warcraft, whose only excuse for harassing Greg was "Dood, its Part of the Game."