Career Day

The people, the jobs, the industry.

Career Day

"Like film and television, gaming has its wunderkinds, young stars that shatter expectations of accomplishment. I've assembled profiles of three of the best and brightest of these gamemakers, our industry's future game gods. One is an independent publisher, the second a revolutionary risk-taker, the third a graphical prodigy. Each is under 30 years old. Here, then, are three under-30 next generation gamemakers to watch." Max Steele presents "Three Under 30."

Career Day

"When we look at a job posting for a game designer, it reads like a checklist for a superhero. The specialized requirements (programming, direction, art, management, music, magic powers and yes, writing) are so disparate it's utterly irrational to expect professional competency in all these areas from one person. Even if he's only actually required to perform one or two of those duties, a jack of all trades, as they say, is still a master of none."

Spanner explores the multifaceted world of game scriptwriters.

Career Day

"Big developers, he says, don't have the luxury of walking away from a game, largely because of the money they pour into development. 'We have no green-lighting process. A lot of people ask us that, and it always brings out a giggle. We have games that people are passionate about, or we have games that are cancelled.'"

Shannon Drake talks to PopCap's John Vechey and Stephanie Jessel.

Career Day

"In conversation, as with public speaking, Zimmerman's voice - slightly high-pitched with a hint of flamboyance - always seems to be the loudest in the room. When asked a question, he answers it fully, even if it takes 10 minutes. He rarely leaves gaps for interruption, and it never feels like he's blowing hot air.

'"The reason he is successful ... is that he's extremely comfortable thinking about things systematically,' Karen Sideman, a friend and former work associate of Zimmerman's, said. 'That's what game design is.'"

Career Day

"A game designer doesn't get paid as much as someone with his equivalent skills in the business world. In reality, a game designer works long hours, relentlessly pursuing to improve himself and his designs, hoping for a little recognition from his superiors.

"But there's a bright side. After all, you really do get to make games."

Ryan Shwayder opens the vault of secrets and explains "How to Become a Game Designer."