Silver Screen, Gold Disc

Silver Screen, Gold Disc

"Licensed games attempt to capture the feeling of the property - some, like Lord of the Rings, are designed to have you retrace the adventures in board game form. See if you can avoid the Nazgul the way Frodo did! They have to bring across the humor or the desperation or the excitement of the book. Others attempt to give you an original story based in the world, like Arkham Horror. You don't go through the plots of the stories, but you are a character in Arkham dealing with Lovecraftian monsters. You could encounter Cthulhu, the color out of space and the Dunwich Horror all in one game (but I wouldn't recommend it)."

Silver Screen, Gold Disc

"Successfully progressing from one generation of console to the next is an admirable feat in itself, but making the leap from successful game franchise to ubiquitous marketing icon isn't always an easy one, especially in today's incestuous and highly self-referential cultural landscape. At least in the case of Mega Man and Mario, this process occurred naturally with personalities created relatively early in the console boom (1987 and 1985 respectively). In these situations, early popularity begat increased exposure, a greater variety of titles and, eventually, more popularity. From there, it was just a matter of some savvy marketing, and game characters suddenly became television stars."

Jon Schnaars explores the marketing genius behind the Mega Man franchise.

Silver Screen, Gold Disc

"That they had a movie playing wasn't a huge surprise; many booths at gaming conventions use them as a gimmick to attract passersby. What was surprising was that it wasn't the typical gamer bait of Street Fighter or Resident Evil or some hacked to ribbons anime, but rather a homebrew homage to Metal Gear Solid. More surprising still was that it was actually quite good; well acted and sharply written, it suffered from none of the self-indulgence and in-jokes that typically plague fan-made films. When I looked up from the DVD, the man who I would later learn was X-Strike's founder was grinning broadly at me. Though he looked exhausted, Tim Ekkebus' enthusiasm for X-Strike's movies radiated out of him in waves that, if properly harnessed, could end our country's dependence on foreign oil."

Susan Arendt speaks to the volunteer indie filmmakers of X-Strike.

Silver Screen, Gold Disc

"The following list is our best attempt to collate those who have been pillaged so often by games, it's almost reached the point where we've forgot where the component elements came from. In terms of series, we're taking the film which was taken from most.
If any of these films had never happened, the game industry would be so screwed they'd even have to - ladies, hold your man, gentlemen, pour a stiffening brandy - try being original for a change."
Kieron Gillen looks at six movies without which many modern games would simply not exist.

Silver Screen, Gold Disc

"Second, perhaps more important, Boll is unrepentant. He cannily exploits, not to say 'revels in,' reviewers' aggrieved reactions. In September 2006, in a highly publicized stunt christened 'Raging Boll,' the director challenged four film critics to boxing matches in Vancouver. Having chosen his opponents for their lack of training, Boll (an experienced fighter) handily defeated them all. He plans to include footage from the bouts on the Postal DVD.

"Like that of his companion devils, Boll's work provokes heated condemnation in gaming forums, as well as on film hobbyist sites such as BollBashers. Noting his dismal and declining box-office grosses - BloodRayne grossed less than $3.6 million worldwide - bewildered viewers often ask, 'Why do people keep funding his movies?'

"Thus - uniquely in the history of film - consideration of Boll leads quickly and naturally to a discussion of the German tax code."