Orphan Black
Orphan Black Review: A New Clone Means Another Loose End to Tie Up this Season

Heather Barefoot | 9 Jun 2014 18:00
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Via Beth Childs' phone, Tony meets up with Art and they head to the base camp of Felix's apartment. Through Felix's eyes, we get a much longer look at the new clone. Although still much like Sarah in appearance, we learn that Tony is actually a transgender clone who is very unaware of the clone situation. Art decides to run Tony's background and see if they can trust the new clone, leaving Felix alone to try and swindle Sammy's cryptic message out of Tony.

scott, cosima runewars

Delphine heads to Mrs. S' house to offer Sarah a new proposal from Rachel. Apparently, there is a new key to the clone cure that doesn't require Kira's stem cells. The catch? The Dyad needs Ethan Duncan instead, who has the synthetic sequences for the clones in his possession.

Back at the Dyad for some late night research, Cosima finds Scott and three friends playing Runewars, a tabletop strategy game, in her laboratory. Finally we get to see more of Cosima's characterization as she swoops in to kick some ass in this awesome game. Mid ass-kicking, Cosima has another coughing fit and it seems like her illness is escalating more quickly than anticipated.

Back at Felix's apartment, Art returns with intel on Tony. Formerly Antoinette Sawicki, Tony and his dead partner Sammy are convicted thieves. Sammy was shot by several unnamed assailants in suits (hello, Dyad Institute) and Art fears that they are already searching out Tony's whereabouts. After Art leaves to continue his detective work on Tony, Felix returns to his apartment and engages in a quick makeout session with the clone, which is all sorts of strange considering Tony's likeness to foster sister Sarah.

tony

It only lasts a few moments before Felix pulls back and Tony tries another approach at retrieving information: revealing Felix's obituary painting of Sarah from season one. Sarah shows up just in time to meet a fleeing Tony and convince him to stay. After getting briefed on the clones and his involvement, Tony delivers Sammy's message: "Tell Beth, 'keep the faith. Paul's like me, he's on it. He's a ghost.'" After delivering the message, Tony is whisked away on a bus out of town for his own safety. With Tony's jobs mostly coming from Sammy's old military contacts, it's not shocking that Paul's name is brought up, but how deeply is Paul involved in this? Has he been playing everyone from the very start? Is he even smart enough to out-wit the Dyad's bigwigs for that long? This is an interesting connection for Paul and another clone, but I don't think Paul has the resources or intelligence to keep the Dyad in the dark for so long, especially not on his own. Maybe he's just great at being a spy, but I don't have that much faith in Paul.

Alison and Donnie try to repair their relationship with a bought of purely honest conversation. It's nice to see the two of them sharing instead of fighting, even if what they're sharing is some pretty dark stuff. Alison confesses her involvement in the death of their neighbor Aynsley and Donnie raises her confession with one of his own about the death of Dr. Leekie. There's one more catch. Donnie used Alison's gun to shoot Leekie and, like the fool he is, put it back in Alison's gun locker at the range post-murder.

Ethan Duncan returns to the Dyad to face his daughter, Rachel. Just as expected, Rachel insists that their relationship hold no emotional attachments, but instead remain professional despite Ethan's plea for forgiveness. Rachel asks a major question regarding the clones - why was Sarah successful in reproducing when no other clone has been? - and we finally get a clear answer from Ethan. The clones were engineered to be barren by design, but Sarah was a failed experiment. Rachel then offers up some insight as to why the clones were made barren, understanding it would be irresponsible and problematic to create a reproducing prototype, but that doesn't lessen her inherent rage.

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