To The Editor: I was refreshed by the notion of a person who does not consider themselves a gamer, but happens to play a lot of games. This is me in a nut shell, and it resonated very clearly.

Thank you.

- Andrew

In Response to The Contrarian by John Tynes: Tynes writes in his article that Nintendo is slowly dying due to its innovation leading it too far from the accepted norm, and that no publisher would wish to invest in developing or modifying a game for one system out of the seven most popular.

How does this statement stand up against news that Sony, after losing a small legal battle over their Dual Shock rumble feature, has installed a motion tracking system to their controllers?

Would it be fair to speculate that publishers will choose to invest in motion tracking? The technology only has a good reputation, and would make an excellent selling point. One could also speculate that Microsoft, in response to this, could release a patch to accept motion sensation from a new batch of controllers.

Although that would be only speculation.

- Dallas

To The Editor: In response to Brian's Letter about "Don't Roleplay the Bugs," I too rolled my eyes when I read this article. However, it wasn't because it was a beginner, trying to be a pro, but rather that he was trying to use the wrong tools for the job.

Contrary to what people believe, it is not possible to emulate the tabletop role-playing experience while we continue to force the issue of real-time environments on players.

An AI is there to aid the GM, not replace him, and this is important for emulating a table-top game. A GM can tell when the party is ready to move on, to point out any clues they mist, or stir the party back on track when they get lost. An AI doesn't do this - and a real-time environment negates the opportunity for the GM to do this.

- Chris

In Response to Wii Will Not Cost More Than $250 from The Escapist Lounge: At that price, the Wii will soon be cheaper than hardwood, making it ideal for making quality furniture...

- cibbuano

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