Editor's Choice

Editor's Choice

"Innovation comes through art. Sure, there are scientists and technicians that aspire to discover new things on their own, of course. But there are also ideas and concepts that are so far-fetched, the only people who are capable of visualizing them are the dreamers, the painters, the writers or the videogame designers."

Greg Tito seeks out science fiction's role in making science reality - and great games.

Editor's Choice

"In the past few years, PC game journalism has been dominated by one thing: the sheer amount of time it takes to play massively multiplayer online games. Of course, you can go off and hide in a corner, pretend to be an expert in one of the many other genres that make up the great messy corpus of PC gaming, but you'd be kidding yourself that it was going to work out for you in the long term. Editors, sub-editors, writers, readers: They all want to know what is going on with MMOGs. Hell, they may not even care to play them, but they want reviews, anecdotes and flavors to be delivered by someone. They want to see inside and get reports from those virtual places. These internet explorations make interesting times for games, and even if you're not there to see it all, you certainly expect someone else to be. That someone has, for the last three years, been me."

Jim Rossignol goes on-location to the burgeoning, third-world melting pot of the game industry, the MMO.

Editor's Choice

"You could list a dozen ways Rooster Teeth's little operation in Austin, Texas won't undermine cable's dominance. That's not the point. This comparison illustrates how an indie (not to say 'amateur') sitcom, created in a videogame engine with practically no money or resources, is reliably building numbers that rival the lower echelons of cable TV."

Allen Varney talks to the makers of the breakout machinima hit, Red vs. Blue.

Editor's Choice

"Convergence can work in many directions and can be spurred by many different parties, but in the case of Madden, the NFL, ESPN and EA had constructed a holy grail, an irresistible package that would draw droves of football fans into the franchise. As [Henry] Jenkins states, 'convergence represents a cultural shift as consumers are encouraged to seek out new information and make connections among dispersed media content.' Madden provides the blueprint to that search."

Jon Schnaars examines the cultural impact of the venerable Madden game franchise.

Editor's Choice

"To state the obvious: The game industry is hit-driven. You've heard the statistics: Fewer than one in seven games actually turns a profit. But what, exactly, makes a hit? Investors regard the blockbuster game phenomenon with a sort of mystical awe, and part of its very definition seems to be invested in its unpredictability."

Erin Hoffman explores the mysterious role of the x-factor in the hit-or-miss world of game development.