Discuss and rate the last movie you watched

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Casual Shinji:

maninahat:
Arrival.

This is a movie where all the nation's armies are made entirely up of paranoid lunatics, desperately looking for an excuse to smash the aliens without a goddamn reason.

Most of the movie shows every nation having their own little team meant to talk to the aliens, which is set up by that nation's government. The only paranoid lunatics we see are two or three soldiers in the American army, and someone from the Russian government executing their language guy.

What about the Chinese fleet trying to start hostilities, and every government choosing to shut down communications the moment the aliens said something vaguely portentous. and the American in charge who spends the whole time trying to convince everyone the aliens are about to attack. What's odd is that if all these superpowers are convinced the aliens are dangerous, surely they would be communicating with each other even more so that they can concert their efforts against the ETs?

The chemistry between the two leads is none existent, which is a problem when that chemistry is a plot essential detail.

How was that plot essential? It's highly suggested that her main reason for hooking up with the guy is because of her daughter.

Her getting unstuck in time is what lets her save the day, but it is introduced to the audience by way of showing us a daughter she hasn't given birth to yet, from a man she is at some point going to fall in love with. The movie does a terrible job of convincing us they are actually falling in love.

McElroy:
John Wick: Chapter 2/10

Complete garbage. I give that one extra point for the brief entertaining moment it had with the other assassins. Otherwise it simply sucks. I'm amazed they still make shit like this. Terrible acting and boring action. Hardcore Henry imitated video games to the fullest which made it a familiar and fun experience to watch. This crap, however, is much more like a tool-assisted speedrun with aimhacks and AI exploits. Anyone who likes this is automatically on my shitlist for life.

Still make shit like this? As in what? As in, actually choreographed action scenes where you can see the actors, what's going on and the shots last longer than 0,5 seconds? Movies that are more creative in their action setpieces than the Expendables and aren't overedited and filled with shakycam to the point of nausea? Movies that rely on physical stunts and people actually doing things instead of CGI and explosion extravagance? Save for these, Hardcore Henry, Fury Road and The Raid movies those kind of movies are hardly ever made these days. I have no idea where you're getting this from.

bartholen:

McElroy:
John Wick: Chapter 2/10

Complete garbage. I give that one extra point for the brief entertaining moment it had with the other assassins. Otherwise it simply sucks. I'm amazed they still make shit like this. Terrible acting and boring action. Hardcore Henry imitated video games to the fullest which made it a familiar and fun experience to watch. This crap, however, is much more like a tool-assisted speedrun with aimhacks and AI exploits. Anyone who likes this is automatically on my shitlist for life.

Still make shit like this? As in what? As in, actually choreographed action scenes where you can see the actors, what's going on and the shots last longer than 0,5 seconds? Movies that are more creative in their action setpieces than the Expendables and aren't overedited and filled with shakycam to the point of nausea? Movies that rely on physical stunts and people actually doing things instead of CGI and explosion extravagance? Save for these, Hardcore Henry, Fury Road and The Raid movies those kind of movies are hardly ever made these days. I have no idea where you're getting this from.

The problem is that all those things you pointed out, is all they relied on for JW 2. I loved the first Wick, but the second one felt very bland and lifeless. It was nothing but action sequences. There really wasn't any emotional push to it like the first one.

That, and for me at least, the action sequences were just too long. Sure, well done shots that we can see what's going on are great, but there is a point where the action becomes monotonous, and they would really benefit from ending it and moving to another scene.

The only scene I truly enjoyed was the shot with the woman he was sent to kill. Her death scene was very well done, and I enjoyed it a lot. The rest was just sort of...eh.

The Silence Game. Okay, it's a series, but think of it being a long film. Disappointed to realise it's basically Sleepers: The Long Version.

Now, I liked Sleepers,great film. But all I can do in this one is see which character was who in Sleepers. And if Jason Patric didn't manage to come across as a bit of a nobber in everything he does (rightly or wrongly), I'd feel a bit worse for the Jason Patric character.

maninahat:
What about the Chinese fleet trying to start hostilities, and every government choosing to shut down communications the moment the aliens said something vaguely portentous. and the American in charge who spends the whole time trying to convince everyone the aliens are about to attack.

How is that every nation's army being paranoid lunatics desperately looking for any chance to attack the aliens? And the American in charge, if you're referring to the C.I.A. agent, has one line about history showing that advanced societies have a tendency to conquer less advanced ones. Even when the aliens mention 'weapon' he doesn't convince anyone they're about to attack, just that Louise needs to find out what they mean by it fast.

It's made clear early on that just them being there and not knowing what they want, on top of the worldwide shock at the very existence of aliens makes for a very tense situation, as it would.

What's odd is that if all these superpowers are convinced the aliens are dangerous, surely they would be communicating with each other even more so that they can concert their efforts against the ETs?

That's precisely what happens. Once China decides to set an ultimatum several other countries fall in line. That's why convincing China to ease off the button is so important.

Her getting unstuck in time is what lets her save the day, but it is introduced to the audience by way of showing us a daughter she hasn't given birth to yet, from a man she is at some point going to fall in love with. The movie does a terrible job of convincing us they are actually falling in love.

At no point is them falling in love ever made explicit. That's just you assuming they must be because they have a baby. With Louise being aware of future events, her knowing she'll have a daughter whom she'll love dearly is what prompts her to start a relationship with Renner's character. In these flash-forward scenes little to no time is spent on her and him together. We don't even see them split up, because for Louise it's all about Hannah.

Samtemdo8:

No its these 2 that got me pregnant with Awesome:

And this (sadly no proper video of it, but still you understand)

They are good scenes in their own right. What makes the recovery and kata scene so powerful for me is how only Poledouris soundtrack and Schwarzeneggers physical acting manages to convey the entire message of the film without every saying anything about it. Conan wields a powerful sword, what his father told him was the only thing you could trust, but the power of his sword (Manowar reference hayooo!) was not enough to defeat Tulsa Doom. Tulsa Doom instead asked what the sword was compared to the hand that wields it, suggesting it is the power of the wielder that matters. The Kata is a reference to his father's ideals, looking at his hand references Doom's idea and yet Conan realizes they are both wrong, because the sword could not give him vengeance and the wielder could be killed. But Valeria's love for him, her determination and conviction, brought him back to life. At that moment Conan realizes that power comes from within, from your own determination. Conan isn't a great man because he has a sword or can wield it well, he's a great man because of his determination and will.

The entire scene is a masterclass in direction and acting, wordlessly referencing every major theme to that point and rejecting them to drive home the message of the movie. Also, it is just beautifully shot with the open ocean and sky in the background, the slow pan and zoom and the ending frog perspective to show us that Conan grows as a person with his new understanding.

(As a gender studies aside, I think Valeria is one of the most under-appreciated female characters in movies of all time. It is she who saves Conan multiple times, it is she who brings him clarity of purpose simply through who she is and what Conan can learn from her and, even more then Subotai or the Seer, she enables him to get his revenge. It is her feminine traits of compassion and caring that make her strong and allows Conan to grow, not that she can swing swords with Conan and Subotai.)

bartholen:

McElroy:
John Wick: Chapter 2/10

Complete garbage. I give that one extra point for the brief entertaining moment it had with the other assassins. Otherwise it simply sucks. I'm amazed they still make shit like this. Terrible acting and boring action. Hardcore Henry imitated video games to the fullest which made it a familiar and fun experience to watch. This crap, however, is much more like a tool-assisted speedrun with aimhacks and AI exploits. Anyone who likes this is automatically on my shitlist for life.

Still make shit like this? As in what?

Hero Shoots Henchmen: The Movie. For freshening up the formula they made sure to nail their stunt choreography, but still kept inhuman aim, protagonist's (and that one bodyguard's) indestructibility, Stormtrooper aim for the henchmen who come at Wick one by one and wait off-screen before Wick has reloaded or no longer faces the opposite direction. I would expect this stuff in a flash animation on Newgrounds in 2003, but in a supposedly big-name action movie it's boring as hell.

Moana

I... liked it. It's safe and predictable, a story of a chosen one finding determination. Everything goes to hell just prior to the very end and the good guy comes back in the nick of time. Very familiar story beats. The humor was hit and miss. I also found it silly that the water that constantly carried the protagonist didn't just carry them all the way to Te Ka. But it was a good story and I kind of liked the characters. I'm taking off one point because it's CG. It's the worst looking Ron Clements/John Musker movie I've seen. I just don't like the technique as much as traditional animation. It also doesn't have a very attractive style. The environments and water are highly detailed and the hair looks real, but the faces are bubbly, round and generically exaggerated/cartoony. Their older movies looked more consistent.

6/10

Saw Victoria and Abdul today.

It's...fine, it's acceptable, it's enjoyable, it's dull, it's...fine. It probably doesn't help that I also saw Viceroy's House this year (#1 film for me this year), which deals with a similar subject matter, but better. Doesn't help that the main character is a bit of a cipher in as much as his motivations go. Obviously there's a lot of history behind it, but as a film itself it's...fine.

6/10.

interesting movies mentioned above... i'm excited to watch those.

Baby Driver - 6/10

It's got a good soundtrack, some nice cinematography at times and good driving scenes, which I've learned were almost entirely created in-camera on location with practical stuntwork, which I appreciate. It's somewhat unfortunate that despite the admirable craftsmanship of these car chases, they never really felt visceral or thrilling because of Baby's almost supernatural skills and some lucky coincidences that are frankly unbelievable (like finding two almost identical cars to his own driving a lane apart in a tunnel, allowing him to escape the cops). The story is ok. It feel sort of Tarantino-esque (Tarantino did have some minor involvement in the movie) at times, but the writing is nowhere near the same level. The dialogue and characters aren't as snappy, well-realized and memorable, with Jamie Foxx' character in particular coming off as a caricature that feels like he belongs in a different movie. Seriously, why would the other characters, notably Kevin Spacey's ever want to work with someone as dangerously violent and unpredictable, let alone more than once? I did like Baby and Debora's performances tho. They had good chemistry.

I find Baby Driver a serviceable movie that gets by on style and cool-factor, but would probably fall flat without it. Wright can and has done better.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but here's a list of every film I've seen this year, cinema or otherwise, along with ratings:

Passengers (3/5)

Sing (4/5)

Assassin's Creed (2/5)

The Edge of Seventeen (3/5)

A United Kingdom (4/5)

Perfect Strangers (3/5)

Lion (3/5)

Jackie (2/5)

No Man's Land (3/5)

Patriots Day (4/5)

Hidden Figures (4/5)

Silence (4/5)

Jasper Jones (3/5)

Dune (3/5)

Logan (4/5)

Pacific Rim (4/5)

Kong: Skull Island (3/5)

Denial (4/5)

Their Finest (3/5)

The Lego Movie (3/5)

Guardians of the Galaxy: Volume 2 (3/5)

Alien: Covenant (4/5)

Prometheus (2/5)

Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (3/5)

X-Men: Apocalypse (3/5)

Trolls (3/5)

Allied (4/5)

Our Kind of Traitor (3/5)

Loving (3/5)

Beauty and the Beast (2017) (3/5)

Jurassic World (3/5)

Churchill (3/5)

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (2017) (3/5)

A Quiet Passion (2/5)

Dunkirk (3/5)

Wonder Woman (3/5)

Baby Driver (4/5)

The Big Sick (3/5)

Power Rangers (2/5)

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (2/5)

Viceroy's House (5/5)

American Made (3/5)

Ali's Wedding (4/5)

Victoria and Abdul (3/5)

So, um, yeah.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pele5vptVgc

So, I saw The King's Choice. By this scale, I'll give it a 6/10.

I suspect I'd get more out of it if I was Norwiegen (or at least Nordic), since while I was familiar with the general history of Germany's invasion of Norway in WWII, I did get the sense that I was expected to know more of the history of the conflict than what the movie provides (e.g. I had to look up who Vidkun Quinsling was). I'm glad that films like this exist that show theatres of WWII that are rarely discussed in the Anglosphere, but, well, yeah.

As for the film itself, it's...decent, I guess. Very dry, and I feel that it was operating on a shoestring budget, because often it has to rely on narration and summarization to convey what's happening. There's one action scene and, well, Band of Brothers this ain't. Not that the film is trying to be an action movie, but while the characters are fine in of themselves, it does feel 'stiff' at times. Also, the editing. A lot of times in film, the camera will cut between shots as characters speak. Here, it's often one continuous scene, while the camera itself shifts from character to character. It's an interesting choice, but I don't feel it works well.

So, yeah. Decent, but I've seen better war films/dramas.

The first Kingsmen: eh, fun enough and flash, but not much else. Ends on a rather tasteless note, and I wouldn't ever buy it, but I'd certainly recommend it to anyone for a casual watch.

Baby Driver.

It was alright. What am I supposed to say? I like Edgar Wright quite a bit, especially Scott Pilgrim vs. The World is a movie very, very dear to my heart and Baby Driver was... you know, pretty good. The characters were good, the action was good, the music was good... I had a good time. I can't say it was really all that memorable aside, of course, from choreographing its action well to its music. It's no Scott Pilgrim or Hot Fuzz or even Shaun of the Dead but a lot of what made these movies good is still there. It's well edited, did a good job of making its setting looks interesting (Despite Atlanta, Georgia probably not being my first choice if I had to find a visually interesting place to set a movie), the humor still landed most es time, even though there wasn't quite as much of it as in most of Wright's other movies... there's quite a bit to enjoy in there. It didn't exactly blow me away but it did entertain me just fine.

Rewatched Her. Still quite good, but not as novel as the first time when you know what you're getting into. It's a pleasant relationship allegory, but I found myself scoffing at their ideas of the future. (Their video games look like shit and use motion controls.)

Before that, rewatched Mr. Destiny, a favorite from childhood. Still a somewhat charming, warm, and relaxing movie. The sexism jumped out a lot more this time, as the women are mostly just objects to be obtained via status and money. Strangely, the two female leads were Rene Russo and Linda Hamilton, who usually play characters with a lot of autonomy and personality. Might have skewed my perspective on women for a few years.

And before that, Johnny Handsome (currently streaming on HBO). Love an 80s Mickey Rourke movie, but this one was a tad flat. Definitely doesn't go where you think, but doesn't get that interesting either. Good performances all around. Feels like a strong Baby Driver influence in terms of tone and themes, so it was worth watching from that perspective. Kind of burned my movie pick in the house on that one, but hey, it's Walter Hill.

IT

a good summer movie but the least scary horror movie I've ever seen to the point I was laughing out loud.

wasted it's R rating otherwise shakey if good film and had a good time

3/5

Logan Lucky, Steven Soderbergh's "comeback" after threatening to quit in 2013. It's not a Great Movie but I had a lot of fun with it. Definitely a better heist movie than any of the Ocean's Eleven flicks. The characters are endearing and they have Coen-levels of understated genius to them. And I enjoyed the comedy a lot, which sometimes bordered on Airplane! levels of self-parody. I dunno, everything in it felt genuine and effortless. Solid 4/5.

Wind River before it. Written and directed by the bloke who wrote the scripts for Sicario and Hell or High Water. It's a similar movie - crime an punishment in the American frontier, with some pressing social issue for icing - but I think doesn't have a very strong direction like either of the other two. Not that Sheridan isn't a good director, but some of the scenes were missing the genius of Denis Villeneuve. I compare the frontier stand-off in Sicario to the one at the end of Wind River - Villeneuve uses every trick in the book to build suspense, Sheridan sort of just goes into tension mode. It's a 3.5/5.

Atomic Blonde was a lot of fun, absurd and stylized in the vein of the John Wick movies. Charlize Theron rocks. McAvoy is fun. Goodman underused and sort of just there, like everything he's done in the past years - Skull Island, Hangover III, there's a few. I guess I was missing more of an emotional investment in the movie, and the stakes never felt very high. Saw it in 4D (you know those seats that rock about more or less in sync with the action on screen) and hated it 100%. A regular 2D screening would get a 3/5. And I'm gonna shoot myself the next time a movie opens a scene in London to the tune of "London Calling".

I liked Baby Driver, Kong: Skull Island and Logan before those. Dunkirk remains the best movie of the year so far.

Criminal: A surprisingly fun and creative movie about a sociopathic criminal who gets the memories and personality of a heroic policeman. Watching him struggle with the two polarized personalities is very entertaining, the character is great, the action is exciting and I really enjoyed it.

Bahubali 2: The Conclusion

Avocado out of four.

It's a Telagu movie. You don't rate Telagu movies -or any South Indian movie- by conventional standards because they all occupy this mysterious status of being both So Bad It's Good, and also Actually Somewhat Good at the same time. Bahubali is a two part historical action movie about a super strong dude called Bahubali (pronounced "Boobily" or "BARHOOBArLEEEEEEE", depending on if you are the movie's villain). I said historical, but its the most gonzo approach to historical accuracy I have ever seen. There is an evil king who has a spinning deathblade chariot that shoots machine guns arrows. It also has this scene:

There's so much bombast I can't not like it. Also, Telagu movies get points for having female characters who actually know how to fight. It then loses those points for damselling them all the time anyway.

PsychedelicDiamond:
Baby Driver.

It was alright. What am I supposed to say? I like Edgar Wright quite a bit, especially Scott Pilgrim vs. The World is a movie very, very dear to my heart and Baby Driver was... you know, pretty good. The characters were good, the action was good, the music was good... I had a good time. I can't say it was really all that memorable aside, of course, from choreographing its action well to its music. It's no Scott Pilgrim or Hot Fuzz or even Shaun of the Dead but a lot of what made these movies good is still there. It's well edited, did a good job of making its setting looks interesting (Despite Atlanta, Georgia probably not being my first choice if I had to find a visually interesting place to set a movie), the humor still landed most es time, even though there wasn't quite as much of it as in most of Wright's other movies... there's quite a bit to enjoy in there. It didn't exactly blow me away but it did entertain me just fine.

Yes! This 100%. Everything was just...good. Interesting use of music and interesting characters and very well done driving stunts and decent acting but to me the overall story was just kinda, whatever. Generic heist type stuff. On the whole, it just didn't gel with me and I agree that Wright has made much better films. It was fun but I wasn't as impressed as some people.

Before that, in theaters I think I saw...Spider-Man: Homecoming maybe? I enjoyed it quite a bit. I'm a pretty big Spider-Man fan and truth be told I liked most of the Spider-man films (aside from the ludicrous, overpacked Spider-Man 3) and this was no exception. It was lighthearted and a nice break from the excessively dreary superhero films we've been getting lately. A lot of people complain about Tom Holland being annoying but he has a kind of dopey charm to him and seeing Spider-Man as a bumbling teenager before he became a true hero is sort of a take different from the other films I feel like. Plus it's almost worth watching just to see Martin Starr as his upbeat, straight-faced teacher.

I just rewatched "Casino Royale." I still like it quite a bit. I know several people who said it was boring or they couldn't follow it, but I think it's plenty interesting, just maybe not as action-oriented as people expected. It's as much about Bond maneuvering, both with the villains and his love interest, as it is about spies shooting each other.

And as much as I like many of the previous Bond films for their various degrees of cheesiness and loony set pieces, I also like a more straightforward and dour take on 007's adventures. That's another thing this film, and Daniel Craig's Bond in general, has been criticized for, but I like it. 7/10.

Rewatched Under the Skin with my friend. 7/10. It's an incredibly slow movie, but in a way it helps the creeping tension. The musical score, especially the main theme, is just terrifying. What I would call the "Abyss" scene was even more harrowing when I knew what was going to happen. It's also one of those movies where the dialogue is kept to an absolute minimum, which I'm liking more and more these days.

Before that I watched Zootopia on Netflix, 7/10. It was actually better than I expected. I'd heard so much backlash after the initial hype about how heavy handed it is that I was pleasantly surprised to find the story itself very engaging. I actually knew the twist ahead of time, but it in no way detracted from the movie. The characters were fun, the animation of course gorgeous, the world building was great, and the completely unexpected reference of a property I'd never expected to see referenced in a Disney film had me in stitches. It doesn't really rock the boat or do anything new, but after having a bit of a burnout with Disney movies after Big Hero 6 (the most insipid Disney theatrical release of the decade), this was a pleasant surprise. Maybe I'll see Moana after all.

The Lady from Shanghai (1947, Orson Welles)

Looks and sounds great. Good dialogue. Entertaining. There are some improbable moments and the story is convoluted, the ending a bit confusing. Maybe it just wasn't communicated well enough or scenes were missing. I read that the studio interfered with the director. Still a strong movie.

8/10

Gangs of New York on Netflix, 4/10.

I already knew I didn't like this movie, I just wanted to see it all the way to the end. I'd never seen it all the way through, partly because one could raise a family and die of old age before this fucking thing is halfway over, and partly because it's Scorsese's most obnoxiously indulgent film ever. It's bloated to the point of insanity: what starts out as a simple revenge narrative completely switches gears halfway through and becomes some kind of lecture about the history of New York in the mid 1800s. As a person who 1. isn't american, 2. has never been to New York and 3. doesn't feel a particular interest in said city, I found it hard to get invested in nearly anything beyond the first half. Even the tagline: "America was born in the streets". That element only comes to play in the second half. The first one could easily have been a mob narrative with new york ca 1862 as a setting. It has too many characters, plot elements, too much of everything! Did I mention that this film feels longer than the first and second world wars combined?

But hey, at least there's Daniel Day-Lewis' powerhouse performance as Bill the Butcheeeeeehhhhhh. Blah. No there isn't. What is here is almost a cartoon character. His performance consists mostly of angry shouting, racist ranting and threats. This is a barely two-dimensional, uber macho evil dark lord from a fantasy movie barely held together by Day-Lewis's intense acting. It just gets silly when everything has to do with violence, power, fear, violence, brutality, killing, terror, violence and more violence. Since this movie lasts for half a century there'd have been plenty of opportunity to try to develop him. Admittedly there is one scene that does just that, but even that gets undercut by most of it being him rambling about enemies, killing, and you guessed it, violence.

Speaking of which, this movie seems weirdly romantic about what's essentially Crips and Bloods in the 1800s. The opening scene in particular feels like some pastiche of Braveheart.

For non-americans like me this film plays very hollow. It's long enough to grow an entire beard while watching it, bloated, the characters are shallow, the story weirdly disjointed, split into two almost entirely different halves and moves in nonsensical ways and it's really, really melodramatic. The most I got out of it now was observing the occasional dated early 2000s filmmaking technique: the weird editing choices, the unfitting music, the distracting CGI elephant. On a technical level it's as masterful as you'd expect from a Scorsese flick, but that's let down in turn by the setting being mostly similar-looking shitty slums and interiors.

Not recommended.

Manchester by the Sea. Expertly written and acted even though I kinda hate the teen character for being more fantasy than real. Just juggling 2 girlfriends in this day and age is impossible, and this guy is also a 16-year-old hockey wonder. Anyway 9/10.

The Void;
Let's see, where to begin...a foreboding lovecraftian-esque descent into nightmarish madness set in an 80's era hospital as a group of people trapped inside try to figure out what the hell is going on and survive. I've heard it's reminiscent of Carpenter's work, so that's about as close a comparison I got for yous. It's not perfect by any means, with some shaky dialogue at times, but as long as you appreciate great practical effects instead of CGI and something a bit different than your typical jump-scares in horror, this one is definitely worth a try. It has atmosphere, claustrophobia, paranoia, confusion...all the fun nuggets of despair!!
Don't watch the trailer or even see the poster if you can help it, it's best knowing as little as possible before going in. Compared to other recent attempts in the genre, this one stands out prominently. I'd rate it a solid HP woodsmoked BBQ sauce out of Lovecraft.

Pocahontas - 7/10 (I guess)

-Sugarcoated. A good message, but sugarcoated. Having said that, I don't have as much of an issue with the historical inaccuracy as probably most critics. These cartoons are fantasy.
-Bypassed the language barrier between the two mains too easily. Because of magic. That part of their relationship could have been interesting.
-As with Cinderella, I didn't like the animal bits.
-I liked the angular art style. It's a good looking movie.
-As usual, the villain was one-dimensional.
-I didn't know raccoons were native to America.

Terminator 2 - 9/10

Never gets old.

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance - 10/10

John Ford's masterpiece, with John Wayne and the always likable James Stewart as main character. Story of a community on the frontier becoming governed. Likable cast, good humor, drama, great acting. Pretty entertaining.

Zorro (1919 Version) 7/10 or 8/10 depending on how important tension is for you.

It was a very fun and feel-good movie. "Feel-good" might sound like a strange term to use in a movie about an oppressive government and a revolution, but if you're looking for tension, or a battered hero fighting tooth-and-nail for his happy ending, then you should look elsewhere.

The movie starts with our hero, Diego returning from a military university in Spain to his home in California, a poor, dusty wasteland of a state that's far from the trendy place it is now. He returns to find that his father has been usurped as governor by a greedy, corrupt man who has the state army backing him, and who is taxing the people way beyond their means to pay them, so he can live a life of luxury.

As Diego returns, he's encouraged to aid his father in rallying the men of California and leading a revolt, but Diago replies with something along the lines of "But why should I trouble myself with something that's not my problem?" This had me nodding, thinking "Ah, the refusal of the call. Let's see what changes his mind." The very next scene has him riding out as Zorro. This sent a pretty clear message. He was not some flawed hero struggling to accept his destiny. He already had a plan to carry out his father's wishes.

The rest of the movie was fun. The whole thing was pretty much watching as his plans unfolded, carrying out raids as Zorro, visiting the governor as himself to convince him to resign and reinstate his father, and wooing the governor's daughter as a bonus. With the exception of one moment near the end where he's imprisoned, everything goes according to plan, and even as he's sitting in a prison cell awaiting his execution, the mood still seems to suggest that he's firmly in control of the situation, as he plots his escape.

As I said before, there aren't any real roadblocks in our hero's quest, just a smooth ride forward as he effortlessly thwarts the guards, manipulates the governor, and woos the daughter. It's fun and has a positive mood from start to finish. If that's what you're looking for, give it a watch.

The Infidel
A small British comedy starring Omid Djalili as a laid-back east-end Muslim cab driver who finds out after his mother dies that he was actually adopted and his original parents were Jewish. Just at a time when his son is preparing engagements with the daughter of a certain Pakistani 'hate-cleric' that may have a recognizable feature to some, and is asked by his son to maintain an image of a devout believer to ease formalities with imminent family introductions. All while he is secretly learning what being Jewish is supposed to be like by an alcoholic, depressed, misanthropic neighbor. Identity crisis, drama, british humour, likeable humans, sincere exploration of topics not seen much with modern media, it's as serious and as light-hearted as it needs to be. Recommended unless you're allergic to Brit comedy/drama.

Xsjadoblayde:
The Void;
Let's see, where to begin...a foreboding lovecraftian-esque descent into nightmarish madness set in an 80's era hospital as a group of people trapped inside try to figure out what the hell is going on and survive. I've heard it's reminiscent of Carpenter's work, so that's about as close a comparison I got for yous. It's not perfect by any means, with some shaky dialogue at times, but as long as you appreciate great practical effects instead of CGI and something a bit different than your typical jump-scares in horror, this one is definitely worth a try. It has atmosphere, claustrophobia, paranoia, confusion...all the fun nuggets of despair!!
Don't watch the trailer or even see the poster if you can help it, it's best knowing as little as possible before going in. Compared to other recent attempts in the genre, this one stands out prominently. I'd rate it a solid HP woodsmoked BBQ sauce out of Lovecraft.

Not to be confused with Enter the Void which is a trippy, experimental romp in New French Extremism and Buddhist philosophy, set in Tokyo and brought to us by Gaspar Noe, the absolutely ridiculous mind behind the nauseating (but I think interesting) Irreversible. In a similar-ish vein as stuff like 2001 in that it has striking visuals to spare, asks some hefty questions about life and existence and is more then two-and-half hours long meaning it is best watched while getting progressively more intoxicated. I don't know if I liked it or not, but it sure is technically brilliant, striking and very different. The fact that it is somehow completely shot from the first-person perspective is also impressive. Plus, being that I am addicted to the insanity of living in Asia, the utter chaos of the Tokyo setting didn't hurt much. Enter the Void gets a solid three and half buzzing neon signs out of five.

EDIT! Fun fact: the hyperkinetic opening credits in Enter the Void very obviously served as some of the inspiration in the music video for Kanye's All of the Lights.

After boring myself half to death with Gangs of new York, I watched a much better DiCaprio movie, Catch Me if You Can, 8/10. It's incredibly entertaining with great performances, editing and pacing. Despite its near 2,5 hour runtime, it never feels like it's dragging or stretched. DiCaprio is a perfect fit for this role, and his charisma just oozes through the screen. Tom Hanks makes an excellent foil and counterpart to his antics. Watching the cat and mouse game between the two and how DiCaprio fools and eludes Hanks time and time again is just so captivating. It's also interesting to see a pre-fame Amy Adams as a sweet and naive young nurse, which not only displays the range as an actress she had even back then, but allows us to see the potential that's since then been fully realized.

The film is a bit fluffy and insubstantial, but the family drama and Abagnale's ultimately hollow existence give it just enough thematic weight for it to avoid going completely in one ear and out the other. It's a great, light-hearted romp.

Shit, now that I thought about it, it'd have been very interesting if Bill was actually gay, perhaps even asexual, and Vallon was the only one he'd ever secretly loved. It would add another layer and an actual reason for why he continues Vallon's remembrance for so long, and give whole new meaning to the line "I never had a son". Given how little we see Bill interact with women at all and how aggressive and hypermasculine he acts, one could easily see it as overcompensation or covering up in a more brutal, way less tolerant time. It'd be really easy too: it'd only require removing a few shots and switching a few lines around. Damn! The more I think about it, the more I like this alternative version.

Chewster:

Xsjadoblayde:
The Void;
Let's see, where to begin...a foreboding lovecraftian-esque descent into nightmarish madness set in an 80's era hospital as a group of people trapped inside try to figure out what the hell is going on and survive. I've heard it's reminiscent of Carpenter's work, so that's about as close a comparison I got for yous. It's not perfect by any means, with some shaky dialogue at times, but as long as you appreciate great practical effects instead of CGI and something a bit different than your typical jump-scares in horror, this one is definitely worth a try. It has atmosphere, claustrophobia, paranoia, confusion...all the fun nuggets of despair!!
Don't watch the trailer or even see the poster if you can help it, it's best knowing as little as possible before going in. Compared to other recent attempts in the genre, this one stands out prominently. I'd rate it a solid HP woodsmoked BBQ sauce out of Lovecraft.

Not to be confused with Enter the Void which is a trippy, experimental romp in New French Extremism and Buddhist philosophy, set in Tokyo and brought to us by Gaspar Noe, the absolutely ridiculous mind behind the nauseating (but I think interesting) Irreversible. In a similar-ish vein as stuff like 2001 in that it has striking visuals to spare, asks some hefty questions about life and existence and is more then two-and-half hours long meaning it is best watched while getting progressively more intoxicated. I don't know if I liked it or not, but it sure is technically brilliant, striking and very different. The fact that it is somehow completely shot from the first-person perspective is also impressive. Plus, being that I am addicted to the insanity of living in Asia, the utter chaos of the Tokyo setting didn't hurt much. Enter the Void gets a solid three and half buzzing neon signs out of five.

EDIT! Fun fact: the hyperkinetic opening credits in Enter the Void very obviously served as some of the inspiration in the music video for Kanye's All of the Lights.

That legitimately looks like an interesting film, sort of like a late gen-x version of The Lovely Bones. *Scribbles indecipherable markings in tattered book* It has been marked for future reference, cooperative human!

So, I'm in New Zealand now, and watched one film and one documentary on the way over. Now, fully aware that airline touchscreens don't make the best cinematic experience in the world, but anyway:

-Ghost in the Shell (5/10)

If I was to describe this film in two words, it would be "aggressively average." I say that as someone who's never seen the anime or whatnot, and can only judge the film on its own merits. And those merits are...meh. Johansen is okay, but just...okay. The action is okay, but done better. The cityscape is fairly interesting, but overshadowed by the more interesting locales of Blade Runner and has a feeling of sterility to it that makes it feel less like a city, and more like an elaborate set. The villain is...meh. The story is okay, but while it touches on ideas of cybernetics, identity, the soul, etc., it doesn't really explore them. Just because a piece of fiction touches on compelling ideas doesn't make the fiction in of itself compelling.

In essence, GitS is a jack of all trades, master of none. I can't comment on how much the original anime influenced the cyberpunk genre, but taking the film entirely on its own merits, it feels like a distillation of the genre rather than a fully fleshed out world. And that's also part of the issue, as I've got so little sense of what the world is like, other than that Japan apparently opened itself up to immigration, an African Union exists, and...that's it.

So, basically average. Hopefully I'll be able to see Blade Runner 2049 in the near future, because all indications are that it's hit itself out of the ballpark.

undeadsuitor:
IT

the least scary horror movie I've ever seen to the point I was laughing out loud.

Pretty much. Saw it last night and at no point did I think it was scary. Well, maybe some of the scenes with the kids parents. Those were honestly more unsettling than Pennywise. And like you said, some scenes with Pennywise got a burst of laughter from the audience.

I wasn't as entertained by it though. I think the movie is too long and really outstays its welcome. About halfway through I started yawning and sighing, waiting for it to be over. My friends felt the same way. They didn't outright say they were bored but it was heavily implied.

Anyway, IT gets a 3/10.

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