The Orville - Star Trek Fanfiction...with penis jokes.

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Major_Tom:

TheVampwizimp:
Yes, all this. A good Starfleet officer doesn't see him or herself as a soldier, not primarily, but serving in Starfleet does sometimes require dispensing the duties of a soldier.

O'Brien certainly saw himself as a soldier. He has been in 235 combat situations and has been decorated 15 times. That's pretty impressive for a soldier, let alone someone who isn't a part of a military organisation.

Well first of all, O'Brien was a non-comm, so technically he isn't an officer in the same vein as Picard or Sisko or most of the other main characters.

Secondly, I said that a good officer doesn't feel like a soldier first , and an explorer second. O'Brien certainly wasn't thrilled about the battles he'd fought and the people he'd killed. He just wanted to be an engineer and fix things, help out his comrades in their exploratory and diplomatic missions.

And third, I think we're on the same side of this argument anyway. Starfleet may not think of itself as a military organization, but the reality of galactic politics forces them to be exactly that, just as it forced O'Brien to be a soldier and Sisko to be a general.

Major_Tom:

Laughing Man:
In that context it you're right, but let me restate this, Gene Roddenbury the guy who came up with Star Trek said that Starfleet is not a military organisation. It's not a case of YOUR interpretation of what is shown on the shows / movies or how the characters and individuals in the show put themselves across, this is the guy who came up with the series flat out telling us that they are not a military organisation. It's quite simple their isn't any grounds to argue about it.

Roddenberry claimed that Starfleet was not a military organization but something akin to the Coast Guard. USCG is a branch of the military.[quote="TheVampwizimp" post="18.1020037.24122377"]

So the creator of the show flat out says a statement that which ever way you twist and turn it cannot be mistaken for anything other than NOT MILITARY but because he compares it to an organisation that any number of people could mistakenly, and no doubt in this instance Roddenbury himself it would seem, mistake for not being military, bam we have proof that Starfleet is military... well I am convinced. Besides the coast guard is not classed as part of the military in all countries anyway so it seems he may well have been mistaken.

I am sorry I am really failing to understand why people are still trying to say that it is military, the f*cking creator of the show said it wasn't END OF DEBATE.

Queen Michael:

Blood Brain Barrier:

Queen Michael:

I'mma say no, it's not sensible to see that continue. That far in the future, we can't know which trends will continue and which ones won't.

Of course we can't know. No one claimed that. The whole point of sci-fi is to speculate.

Yeah, but almost 500 years into the future it's not sensible to guess that our trends will continue.

Yeah it is. It's more sensible than to guess that they will reverse or stop trending. You have to guess something.

Laughing Man:
So the creator of the show flat out says a statement that which ever way you twist and turn it cannot be mistaken for anything other than NOT MILITARY but because he compares it to an organisation that any number of people could mistakenly, and no doubt in this instance Roddenbury himself it would seem, mistake for not being military, bam we have proof that Starfleet is military... well I am convinced. Besides the coast guard is not classed as part of the military in all countries anyway so it seems he may well have been mistaken.

I am sorry I am really failing to understand why people are still trying to say that it is military, the f*cking creator of the show said it wasn't END OF DEBATE.

If he was mistaken about the USCG, he could've been mistaken about the Starfleet too. Maybe being a combat pilot during WWII colored his perception of the military and he didn't realize there was more to it than dropping bombs on other countries (he flew the B-17). I don't know, I didn't know him, but either way he was demonstrably wrong. Starfleet is military. Except in Enterprise.

Also, if you're going to cite the man as authority, at least get his name right.

TheVampwizimp:
Secondly, I said that a good officer doesn't feel like a soldier first , and an explorer second. O'Brien certainly wasn't thrilled about the battles he'd fought and the people he'd killed. He just wanted to be an engineer and fix things, help out his comrades in their exploratory and diplomatic missions.

And third, I think we're on the same side of this argument anyway. Starfleet may not think of itself as a military organization, but the reality of galactic politics forces them to be exactly that, just as it forced O'Brien to be a soldier and Sisko to be a general.

Yeah, your're right. But that's true even in modern militaries, isn't it? Most people aren't thrilled about the battles they've fought and the people they've killed. Many servicemen and women are engineers, doctors, technicians, scientists, etc. first and soldiers second. People don't join the military because they're bloodthirsty murderers, that's insulting.

I think people who claim that "Starfleet isn't military" and that "it must be something more" have a very medieval view of military, like Saelune said. Sure, there is more emphasis on exploration and diplomacy in Starfleet but that's just the product of circumstances and in essence it's still a military organisation which is proven every time there's a war. And there have been plenty of wars even in TOS which makes the "but Roddenberry said" excuse void. Let's call a duck a duck.

Major_Tom:
snippity

Blood Brain Barrier:
snappity

Laughing Man:
snop

Saelune:
snipped some more

Note: I don't know if this is everyone derailing or heck, I may have accidentally quoted people not derailing but I'm pretty sure everyone is talking Star Trek's Federation thingy or whatever rather than the show this thread is supposed to be about in these quotes but this goes for everyone in this thread.

The OP asked nicely at the end of page 1 to drop the discussion over Starfleet and what kind of Military it is or whatever you guys are talking about and get back on track to talking about The Orville. I'm also going to ask everyone nicely to do it so please don't make me have to do it again. Create a new thread about Star Trek's military and overarching sybolism if you guys want to talk Star Trek's military and overarching symbolism.

So episode 2 was better than the first, if only 'cause it had 2 jokes in it. They weren't funny, not really, but they at least tried.

I'm still not sure what the Orville is. Its not a comedy show, at least not in the 'tell jokes' sense. It takes itself too serious to be funny, yet its too awkward and weird to be a serious show. Like they have comedic set-ups, but because its a light-hearted take on Star Trek, everyone just shrugs the comedy off as common place. It's a vaudeville era troop with no straight-man. Just Costello selling peanuts with no Abott to tell him to stop so they can start Who's On First.

The running gag for the episode is the Worf stand-in character laid an egg. And...that's awkward. See he's a big burly black man with a deep voice, and big burly black men with deep voices don't normally lay eggs. And I don't mean its awkward for us the watchers, its awkward in that the characters are a little awkward about him laying an egg...and that's it.

The second joke is that pot can be made in the replicators. Teehee? 4:20? L33t?

Oh and there's a bum.

Silentpony:
So episode 2 was better than the first, if only 'cause it had 2 jokes in it. They weren't funny, not really, but they at least tried.

I'm still not sure what the Orville is.

Yeah I am kinda stuck on what it is meant to be as well. It's like Star Trek but with out any of the real serious purpose or command structure. The humour isn't silly enough to belly laugh but here's the thing it isn't clever enough to be witty either it's mostly just referential humour, oh look pot cakes can be made in our replicators, we gave them a huge amount of crappy 21st TV for their zoo.

The weird thing is the plots of the last two episodes hav actually been quite interesting, but the mix between daft commentary humour and humour that seems to be stuck in referencing 21st century happenings (to put that in context that's like us making jokes about the events of the 1500s) doesn't jell well with the attempts at making a serious point, in this case the whole learning what it means to be in charge.

I am done with the show yet, it's certainly worth a few more episodes just to see if it's finding its feet and to see if there is a greater over arcing universe going on in the background, they did mention the Kriel in this episode, which I believe are the bad guys from the last episode.

Well, the interviews have said that they're aiming for something akin to MASH - a "dramedy" in the science fiction genre. It's also a reaction against all of the dark SF that has come out in the last few years in the wake of BSG, with a not small amount of homage to the optimism of ST:TNG and TOS.

And so far I'm liking it, a lot. It's nice to see a show with some actual optimism about the future, and a comedy that does not revolve around the characters being idiots (the crew of the Orville may have their quirks and flaws, but everybody on that bridge is qualified to be there). It's nice to see a ship that is meant to be a place somebody would actually want to serve, and which is out there to EXPLORE. And, frankly, I have the funny feeling that The Orville may end up doing Gene Roddenberry's optimistic vision of the future better than Star Trek: Discovery will.

Looks and sounds exactly like a typical MacFarlane comedy. I'm out. Sci-fi comedy shouldn't be handed to the lowest common brownominator. What a waste of potential.

Blood Brain Barrier:

KissingSunlight:
I liked The Orville. The pilot wasn't perfect. I think it does have the elements to be a really good substitute for Star Trek.

I appreciated that they didn't go for a Star Trek parody. It seems more like a human version of Star Trek. While the various Star Trek series were mostly good in their own way. The characters didn't seem all that relatable. The Orville have characters mentioning mundane things like needing to go to the bathroom. I love the scene where the characters were initially unimpressed with the important technology.

So, I am not ready to declare The Orville to be a great show. I think it is going to be a lot better than most people think.

I don't think expressing the need to go to the bathroom while talking to your superior officer makes a character more relatable, necessarily. If anything, it's the opposite. This show actually seems a more accurate version of the future with more relaxed protocols. In Star Trek there was a strict authoritarian/military structure to the Federation, which even now seems antiquated.

OK, I am a little hesitant to reply. Since this post started the whole "Is The Federation a military organization?" BTW, my vote is "yes".

I think you forgotten that these characters knew each other personally. Even though, they had different rank. There was some latitude to be casual to each other. So, I had no problem with that scene.

Robert B. Marks:
Well, the interviews have said that they're aiming for something akin to MASH - a "dramedy" in the science fiction genre. It's also a reaction against all of the dark SF that has come out in the last few years in the wake of BSG, with a not small amount of homage to the optimism of ST:TNG and TOS.

And so far I'm liking it, a lot. It's nice to see a show with some actual optimism about the future, and a comedy that does not revolve around the characters being idiots (the crew of the Orville may have their quirks and flaws, but everybody on that bridge is qualified to be there). It's nice to see a ship that is meant to be a place somebody would actually want to serve, and which is out there to EXPLORE. And, frankly, I have the funny feeling that The Orville may end up doing Gene Roddenberry's optimistic vision of the future better than Star Trek: Discovery will.

What's the comedy though? What's funny? Where are the jokes? Or the optimism? I'm not getting a feeling they're any more hopeful than any of the TNG cast.
It seems like its being too goofy to be optimistic and too straight to be funny.

I'm liking it so far with my fiancee. I was expecting it to be more comedic, but so far I don't the more "serious" approach. STD is going to have an uphill battle.

I had my reservations about the show when I first watched the trailer, I totally was not feeling the ex-wife as second in command thing and I'm usually not that happy about McFarlane's comedy shows, but after having watched the first 4 episodes I'm glad that I sat down to watch it, it is a lot more "serious" than its trailers lead me to believe and the ex-wife thing isn't played as ridiculously or as often as I had thought it would.

Dare I say it, I'm currently more looking forward to the new The Orville episode than I am to the new ST:D episode, not saying that ST:D is bad or anything, but I'm loving how quick The Orville got off its feet with introducing the bridge crew and diving into entertaining stories from episode 2 onward. I have always been more of a fan of single-episode-contained stories rather than dragged out overarching ones, so The Orville is playing right up my alley at the moment.

It's an okay show, with most of the time feeling like McFarlane is just doing this to live out his own star trek fantasy.

But, as redlettermedia described it in a recent talk about Discovery, with startreks turn to be more cinematic and tough, Orville is currently the only show that satisfies the TNG startrek era itch.

undeadsuitor:
It's an okay show, with most of the time feeling like McFarlane is just doing this to live out his own star trek fantasy.

But, as redlettermedia described it in a recent talk about Discovery, with startreks turn to be more cinematic and tough, Orville is currently the only show that satisfies the TNG startrek era itch.

You know, if I had the financial and media clout to essentially strongarm Fox into helping me post a Star Trek alike series so I could be in it as the captain? I'd do it as well.

I just wish it had less base humour in it than it does... but I suppose that's one of the things he proposed to get them to say yes. "I'll use the family guy, american dad level humour... you know how well that does with people."

(shrugs)

KaraFang:

undeadsuitor:
It's an okay show, with most of the time feeling like McFarlane is just doing this to live out his own star trek fantasy.

But, as redlettermedia described it in a recent talk about Discovery, with startreks turn to be more cinematic and tough, Orville is currently the only show that satisfies the TNG startrek era itch.

You know, if I had the financial and media clout to essentially strongarm Fox into helping me post a Star Trek alike series so I could be in it as the captain? I'd do it as well.

I just wish it had less base humour in it than it does... but I suppose that's one of the things he proposed to get them to say yes. "I'll use the family guy, american dad level humour... you know how well that does with people."

(shrugs)

Oh yeah totally. If I had the money and clout of McFarlane (as well as the knowledge that like everything, my time in the spotlight is waning) I would, for sure, fund some big dream project like this...and it would probably be a startrek show with me as the captain....

And he's not doing this for the wrong reasons either. He's a fan of startrek and made this as an anti-thesis to all the dramatic serious scifi shows that have taken over (Discovery included)

But yeah...it really doesn't elevate itself above Family Guy level in the humor department, and it every time it gets too...idk too much like an actual startrek show it panics and makes a dick joke to remind itself that it's a mcfarlane comedy show. which is a shame cause there's constant moments where the show feels...real...and not a parody.

I mean the senior officer group is really good and I would love a show that took all their characters seriously

ObsidianJones:

Given that definition, having Warship... I'm sorry, "Tactical Cruisers that were only really designed for combat" such as the Prometheus Class and the Defiant Class makes Starfleet the federation's de facto military. They are the ones issued the ships that can fight battles, they are the ones issued the phasers. They are what the Federation has and who the Federation uses when war breaks out.

They can call them whatever they want, but by definition, they are a military branch. But as I've said many times before, and in the last time you quoted me, their actual position in the Starfleet is a hybrid of military peacekeeping exploring diplomats.

That and things like the Kobayashi Maru exercise sums it up quite succinctly that it has a martial aspect and even goes as far to instill the idea of 'accepting death' is just a part of the job, which is pretty indicative of a martial society and mindset. When I wasan enlistee, we trained for 'contingencies' ... no one tells you to effectively 'die with honour'.

They almost make the Kobayashi Maru incident a staple of an officer's education, the benchmark to examining whether every cadet has that mindset going into every advanced position in Starfleet. So this wasn't as if just a minor moral theory in 'morality and ethics 101' at Starfleet Academy, this was the final moral metrics that they wished to impart to every cadet that went through their halls.

Pretty fucked up, if you ask me. A society of explorers should be more inclined to spread the message that through teamwork, math and foresight, that any obstacle can be survived and beaten. The Kobayashi Maru incident is pretty fucking awful, and the fact that it's considered 'suitable' for explorers to 'learn' is a fairly big indictment towards basic concepts of humanism and enlightened leadership.

So, anyway, saw the first two episodes. And...it's okay. Not great or anything, but okay. The humor isn't exactly comedic gold, but it's way, WAY better than the kind of stuff McFarlane has done in stuff like Ted and Family Guy. It's basically a light-hearted romp. I would stress that two episodes in, it isn't a parody of Star Trek. Oh sure, it's a lot more focused on humor and a lot more crass, but it still plays its tropes straight. We have the not!Federation operating the not!Enterprise, which engages its not!warp drive, and comes into conflict with not!klingons, who's manned by the same types of characters that TNG has, at least in the roles they hold in the chain of command.

That said, if the 'spirit of Star Trek' to you is thought provoking questions and analogy to real-world situations, you're not going to find it here. I understand ep. 3 sort of deals with that, but with what I've seen so far, this isn't the place to find it. Ultimately, the Orville is fun, undemanding sci-fi. Which is fine. But I can't call it better or worse than Discovery, as they're both going for different angles. If you want simple light-hearted fun, go for the Orville. If you want more layered characters with a more serious storyline, go for Discovery. Or heck, just watch both.

Hawki:
So, anyway, saw the first two episodes. And...it's okay. Not great or anything, but okay. The humor isn't exactly comedic gold, but it's way, WAY better than the kind of stuff McFarlane has done in stuff like Ted and Family Guy. It's basically a light-hearted romp. I would stress that two episodes in, it isn't a parody of Star Trek. Oh sure, it's a lot more focused on humor and a lot more crass, but it still plays its tropes straight. We have the not!Federation operating the not!Enterprise, which engages its not!warp drive, and comes into conflict with not!klingons, who's manned by the same types of characters that TNG has, at least in the roles they hold in the chain of command.

That said, if the 'spirit of Star Trek' to you is thought provoking questions and analogy to real-world situations, you're not going to find it here. I understand ep. 3 sort of deals with that, but with what I've seen so far, this isn't the place to find it. Ultimately, the Orville is fun, undemanding sci-fi. Which is fine. But I can't call it better or worse than Discovery, as they're both going for different angles. If you want simple light-hearted fun, go for the Orville. If you want more layered characters with a more serious storyline, go for Discovery. Or heck, just watch both.

The series does get deeper and have less crass jokes. The Orville is definitely in the spirit of ST:TNG. In fact, the last episode was directed by Jonathan Frakes (Commander Riker).

The series keeps getting better and better.

I really hope it's being watched enough to justify a second season or three.

Tanis:
The series keeps getting better and better.

I really hope it's being watched enough to justify a second season or three.

Six seasons and a movie.

Though in all seriousness, seems the ratings have stabilised at a little over 3 million live viewers. Not sure how much the show costs but whatever cutoff point probably isn't too high given the fact the show clearly isn't on a high end budget (I'd be surprised if it was much over 3 million at most).

Something that helps is the fact that this is a passion project for Seth, who Fox wants to keep happy due to the fact Family Guy is still one of their biggest cash cows, and he can pull the plug on that without their involvement any time, so they probably want to keep him happy. Add to that the fact that the show offsets its production costs with Ghosted, and that drives the barrier needed for it to succeed down even more (the two shows share props, bringing down the cost of both. I've seen some claim Ghosted exists to make props for Orville, but I think it's more that since one was approved the other, being able to be made on the cheap as a result, also got approved).

If it isn't renewed they'll likely wait until the season is over to not kill viewership (who wants to watch a cancelled show in its first season?), but if it if gets a back nine (still holding out hope) that'll be a good sign it'll get a second season. Not assured, could get a second season without extending the first one, but I'd like a back nine anyway.

I was surprised at the lack of bad family guy tier jokes in Pria (outside of everything that comes out of slime norm McDonald's mouth but he's easy to write off) . Hopefully this is a good for the future.

So, I've caught up with Pria, and...I'm sorry, how does the ending make any sense? They destroy the wormhole so that Pria can't come...except presumably she could still come because the wormhole is destroyed at only one point in time, so any point prior to that time should still allow a valid point of entry into the 25th century. And if that does stop her coming, then shouldn't that mean they died in the dark matter storm (note: dark matter doesn't work like that). But if they died, then they could never live to stop her coming to save them, but if she saved them so they could stop her from saving them, then...

Gah!

Anyway, series has got better over time. It's fun, undemanding fluff. Not great, but still fun.

Hawki:
So, I've caught up with Pria, and...I'm sorry, how does the ending make any sense? They destroy the wormhole so that Pria can't come...except presumably she could still come because the wormhole is destroyed at only one point in time, so any point prior to that time should still allow a valid point of entry into the 25th century.

The wormhole was destroyed in Pria's past, meaning that it ceased to exist centuries before she was born.

And if that does stop her coming, then shouldn't that mean they died in the dark matter storm (note: dark matter doesn't work like that).

Not if the wormhole was destroyed after the timeline was changed so that the Orville was saved.
Look at it this way: The Orville was destroyed on Monday. Pria traveled from next Saturday to Sunday to set up rescuing and collecting the Orville. On Tuesday Pria takes the Orville through the wormhole to next Saturday. Issac regains control of the Orville and takes it back through the wormhole to Tuesday (effectively 'locking in' Pria's first visit). Captain Mercer orders the wormhole destroyed on Wednesday.

So at NYCC Seth stated that he's confident that Fox will order a second season. While not an outright confirmation by any stretch of the imagination, given his relation with Fox that's about as close as we'll get until it actually happens.

I'm still holding out for a Back 9.

twistedmic:

Not if the wormhole was destroyed after the timeline was changed so that the Orville was saved.
Look at it this way: The Orville was destroyed on Monday. Pria traveled from next Saturday to Sunday to set up rescuing and collecting the Orville. On Tuesday Pria takes the Orville through the wormhole to next Saturday. Issac regains control of the Orville and takes it back through the wormhole to Tuesday (effectively 'locking in' Pria's first visit). Captain Mercer orders the wormhole destroyed on Wednesday.

I'm not quite following.

If destroying the wormhole in the past prevents it from existing in the future, then Pria should never be able to travel back at all. Ergo, she never comes back, and the Orville should be destroyed in the dark matter storm. Otherwise it's just picking and choosing the effects of causality. Unless you're suggesting that an alternate timeline is created the moment the Orville is saved, so Pria not coming back doesn't mean anything because she came back to the original timeline or something, but even so, it feels like picking and choosing.

Normally I wouldn't mind so much (I watch Doctor Who for crying out loud), but the episode is predicated on time travel mechanics that feel wonky at best. And again, DARK MATTER DOESN'T WORK LIKE THAT!

Zontar:
So at NYCC Seth stated that he's confident that Fox will order a second season.

Of course he says that. And of course Fox greenlights season 2 of the Orville while leaving Firefly to rot. :(

Zontar:

I'm still holding out for a Back 9.

A what?

Hawki:

A what?

A Back 9 is when 9 episodes are ordered for a 13 episode season while it's airing, bringing it up to 22.

Hawki:
So, I've caught up with Pria, and...I'm sorry, how does the ending make any sense? They destroy the wormhole so that Pria can't come...except presumably she could still come because the wormhole is destroyed at only one point in time, so any point prior to that time should still allow a valid point of entry into the 25th century. And if that does stop her coming, then shouldn't that mean they died in the dark matter storm (note: dark matter doesn't work like that). But if they died, then they could never live to stop her coming to save them, but if she saved them so they could stop her from saving them, then...

Gah!

Anyway, series has got better over time. It's fun, undemanding fluff. Not great, but still fun.

Grandfather paradox, they stopped the only way the person that saved them from getting to them and being able to save them, however it looks like the show isn't using the singular linear timeline where cause = effect it looks like (at least according to the Captains little interaction with Pria at the end) that they are using the idea that decision causes the formation of multiple parallel universes in which all alternatives are played out. Even then it still ended with the typical head scratcher how does a = b if c changed a usually associated with the Grandfather Paradox.

Theirs also the interesting moral implication of if the Orville was destroyed and she had come up with an alternative that would save the ship but allow it to no longer have an effect on the time line is it right to stop her, especially if as she said their was no intention of hurting the crew, saying that it did get waved away with him placing the blame on her for saving them in the first place.

the latest episode Krill was pretty good. the plot was good, the alien makeup was fantastic considering the amount of extras (and children) they had at once, and the funny bits were funny. even if the opening gag lasted a little bit too long

It's not like we haven't had dick jokes in Star Trek

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1n9fS7fcog

So the Union are the Federation and the Krill are the Klingons, I wonder what we'll get for the Romulans, and which species they'll be the cousins of (I'm betting the Mocklans).

Zontar:
So the Union are the Federation and the Krill are the Klingons, I wonder what we'll get for the Romulans, and which species they'll be the cousins of (I'm betting the Mocklans).

The Union's undoubtedly the Federation, but I feel the mochlans have more in common with the klingons. Well, TNG klingons at least. Haven't been able to watch The Orville beyond episode 6, but if I had to draw a comparison to a Star Trek race with the krill at this point in time, while an argument could be made for TOS klingons, but they might have more in common with the nausicans (space pirates and all that).

Zontar:
So the Union are the Federation and the Krill are the Klingons, I wonder what we'll get for the Romulans, and which species they'll be the cousins of (I'm betting the Mocklans).

I watched episode 1 this morning, and if anything, the Krill more reminded me of the Cardassians.

ObsidianJones:

Given that definition, having Warship... I'm sorry, "Tactical Cruisers that were only really designed for combat" such as the Prometheus Class and the Defiant Class makes Starfleet the federation's de facto military. They are the ones issued the ships that can fight battles, they are the ones issued the phasers. They are what the Federation has and who the Federation uses when war breaks out.

They can call them whatever they want, but by definition, they are a military branch. But as I've said many times before, and in the last time you quoted me, their actual position in the Starfleet is a hybrid of military peacekeeping exploring diplomats.

The thing is, none of the Trek series (except maybe DS9, which I know next to nothing about) were centred on the military side of Starfleet. The Enterprise was always an explorer that occasionally skirmished with limited hostile forces. The closest I can think of to seeing the Federation at war was Wolf 359, and that was more Pearl Harbor than Midway. You can't really compare Starfleet to any real-world institution, because nothing in the real world would require what the Federation does. Coast Guard isn't a bad comparison, if you combine them with like, NOAA research expeditions.

gsilver:

Zontar:
So the Union are the Federation and the Krill are the Klingons, I wonder what we'll get for the Romulans, and which species they'll be the cousins of (I'm betting the Mocklans).

I watched episode 1 this morning, and if anything, the Krill more reminded me of the Cardassians.

I'd say they look like the Jem'Hadar from DS9.

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