Your most Unpopular Media Opinion

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 NEXT
 

Xsjadoblayde:

Guy Pearce is a dedicated actor and a little underutilised in this case. But that's a legitimately more interesting reason than I considered for his curious presence in the film. Must have missed the pre-release promotional material completely there.

The promotional shorts were all pretty good, but the Weyland TED Talk is really the only one that I think is essential to the movie. It's not only outstanding work by Pearce, but it sets up the theme and ties the film's title in really well.

Canadamus Prime:

I'm not going to fault anyone for enjoying Prometheus, but you do realize that you have a film about a trillion dollar space mission manned by a crew of morons essentially based on cave drawings and blind faith, and helmed by the worst scientists in the history of man. Also it's backed by Mr. Weyland because of the vague promise of extending his life.

I do realize it, and I didn't bother me (well, except for the aforementioned Millburn business with the snake thing). I think the characters acting recklessly and foolishly in Prometheus is a feature, not a bug, as the saying goes. The movie is about people reaching for and misusing power, and then paying the consequences for that behavior (whether it's the human scientists or the engineers who fucked around with the black goo and got wacked by their own creations). Weyland is desperate to extend his life, so he doesn't care how much money he wastes or who is put in danger -- he'll risk it all on a longshot. Shaw and Holloway are desperate to prove their theory and their life's work is correct, and they'll risk life and limb (jumping into an oncoming storm to save a severed engineer head, taking your biosuit helmet off becaue you're SO convinced the engineers are real and breathed oxygen that you'll take that risk) in order to validate that. I'm not saying they're NOT acting stupid -- they are -- I'm saying I understand *why* they're acting stupid, and I think it's in keeping with the theme of the movie.

Canadamus Prime:

Xsjadoblayde:

Exley97:

What is happening right now? Am I in the Upside Down? The Dark Mirror universe? Did I jump under my desk for *nothing*? WHERE ARE ALL THE PROMETHEUS HATERS???

Yup. Despite my love of the film, I totally agree with this. That scene should have worked better, as it was inconsistent with what the movie had already established about Millburn (he wanted to get the F out of there with Fifield). However, I've posted this in another thread here a few months back, but it bears repeating -- there's a scene that was cut from the threatrical version that shows the team when they first arrive inside the structure, and Millburn discovers the bugs/worms/whatever that eventually get mixed with the black goo and become the snakes, and he's super excited because, as the movie explains, it's the first recorded discovery of life outside of earth, and the bugs/worms are totally harmless. So that kind of explains why he would go from scared tosuddenly excited when the snakes show up. In fact, I think during the audio commentary, either Spaights or Lindelof even acknowledges that the snake scene doesn't work because they cut that 30-second or so segement earlier in the movie. Oh well....when Ridley does a Director's Cut of the film in a few years, he can add that back in (and hopefully more of Janek).

I, too, appreciated Prometheus, despite the faults. One thing that annoyed me personally was the young man in old man make-up. It's like the easiest problem to avoid...just cast an old actor! There's no shortage of them! It looks incredibly distracting. But yeah, still good though.

Oh, these guys covered it quite well, explaining more in depth against the online hate it received, while remaining critical;

I'm not going to fault anyone for enjoying Prometheus, but you do realize that you have a film about a trillion dollar space mission manned by a crew of morons essentially based on cave drawings and blind faith, and helmed by the worst scientists in the history of man. Also it's backed by Mr. Weyland because of the vague promise of extending his life.

Well... you kinda are faulting us, aren't you?

I understand, but it doesn't matter, really. I don't want to watch super competent and faultless scientists/heroes making the next great discovery by the book and nerding out spending hours of footage basically doing administration and filling out forms. I want to watch them get killed. Was it silly? Some of it was, sure, absolutely. I can't defend some of the stupid actions that the characters take- Why did the ladies both run in the directional path of the giant rolling alien space-donut? On what world is it cool to try and touch an alien cobra clearly displaying some sort of reactive behavior (even in light of the facts that Exley97 has brought to light regarding a missing sequence)? Even if there is air, what would possess you to take your helmet off? What guarantee did the synthetic have that the alien goo would poison someone- was he childishly jealous of the two doctor's relationship to each other? Who throws a trillion dollars at this sort of enterprise without waaay better protocol?

But I didn't find it boring. I had fun.

EDIT: Arg, Exley97 already typed out a better response.

the December King:

Well... you kinda are faulting us, aren't you?

I understand, but it doesn't matter, really. I don't want to watch super competent and faultless scientists/heroes making the next great discovery by the book and nerding out spending hours of footage basically doing administration and filling out forms. I want to watch them get killed. Was it silly? Some of it was, sure, absolutely. I can't defend some of the stupid actions that the characters take- Why did the ladies both run in the directional path of the giant rolling alien space-donut? On what world is it cool to try and touch an alien cobra clearly displaying some sort of reactive behavior (even in light of the facts that Exley97 has brought to light regarding a missing sequence)? Even if there is air, what would possess you to take your helmet off? What guarantee did the synthetic have that the alien goo would poison someone- was he childishly jealous of the two doctor's relationship to each other? Who throws a trillion dollars at this sort of enterprise without waaay better protocol?

But I didn't find it boring. I had fun.

1. I personally didn't feel like he was faulting fans of the film, and as I stated in the previous post, the characters DID at stupidly -- I just think that was part of the point of the movie.

2. I addressed some of the stupidity in the previous post alread. But about the juggernaut crash and Shaw/Vickers....I thought that 1) the ship was so goddamn huge that they couldn't properly gauge what it was doing/where it was moving at first, and 2) they ran in that direction because if they decided to turn left, for example, and the ship stopped rolling and fell to the left, they were fucked, and vice versa. I mean....the sonofabitch was HUGE [Parker voice] and on the ground, it would have been tough to figure out how wide/tall it was, how fast it was rolling, etc., whereas the audience had the overhead view and could see that, yeah, Vickers was gonna get crushed.

3. Lastly....I've written this before, but what the hell, we're on a roll here -- the questions about Prometheus are absolutely worth asking, but I also think similar questions are worth asking about Alien/Aliens (and the latter is my favorite movie of all time, for the record). For example, why does the flipping science officer of the Nostromo, presumably the best person to investigate an alien spacecraft, stay behind while the captain, first officer and navigator go off to investigate? Why does Ripley go back for her stupid cat? Why does Weyland Yutani tell the Hadley's Hope colony to go check out the Alien ship after Ripley has told them what's inside the ship, and why do they send a mom & pop scouting team WITH THEIR KIDS to check it out (Director's Cut)? Why do they even build a colony on Acheron in the first place if the juggernaut beacon is still active (yes, I know Alien: Isolation addresses this retroactively, but still)? And why oh why do the Colonial F---ing Marines go down to the planet without leaving ANYONE back on the Sulaco in case they need a rescue? Now THAT is fucking stupid....

the December King:

Canadamus Prime:
SNIP

Well... you kinda are faulting us, aren't you?

I understand, but it doesn't matter, really. I don't want to watch super competent and faultless scientists/heroes making the next great discovery by the book and nerding out spending hours of footage basically doing administration and filling out forms. I want to watch them get killed. Was it silly? Some of it was, sure, absolutely. I can't defend some of the stupid actions that the characters take- Why did the ladies both run in the directional path of the giant rolling alien space-donut? On what world is it cool to try and touch an alien cobra clearly displaying some sort of reactive behavior (even in light of the facts that Exley97 has brought to light regarding a missing sequence)? Even if there is air, what would possess you to take your helmet off? What guarantee did the synthetic have that the alien goo would poison someone- was he childishly jealous of the two doctor's relationship to each other? Who throws a trillion dollars at this sort of enterprise without waaay better protocol?

But I didn't find it boring. I had fun.

EDIT: Arg, Exley97 already typed out a better response.

Well no. If you can enjoy a movie despite it's flaws, then by all means enjoy the movie. I'm not going to tell you you shouldn't. I was just saying that the movie has flaws. Like it's entire setup for example. I will give props to Michael Fassbender for his portrayal of David though. That was the best part of the movie.

Exley97:

Canadamus Prime:

I'm not going to fault anyone for enjoying Prometheus, but you do realize that you have a film about a trillion dollar space mission manned by a crew of morons essentially based on cave drawings and blind faith, and helmed by the worst scientists in the history of man. Also it's backed by Mr. Weyland because of the vague promise of extending his life.

I do realize it, and I didn't bother me (well, except for the aforementioned Millburn business with the snake thing). I think the characters acting recklessly and foolishly in Prometheus is a feature, not a bug, as the saying goes. The movie is about people reaching for and misusing power, and then paying the consequences for that behavior (whether it's the human scientists or the engineers who fucked around with the black goo and got wacked by their own creations). Weyland is desperate to extend his life, so he doesn't care how much money he wastes or who is put in danger -- he'll risk it all on a longshot. Shaw and Holloway are desperate to prove their theory and their life's work is correct, and they'll risk life and limb (jumping into an oncoming storm to save a severed engineer head, taking your biosuit helmet off becaue you're SO convinced the engineers are real and breathed oxygen that you'll take that risk) in order to validate that. I'm not saying they're NOT acting stupid -- they are -- I'm saying I understand *why* they're acting stupid, and I think it's in keeping with the theme of the movie.

As I stated Shaw and Holloways theories were based on cave drawings. These dots on a wall just so happen to match up with a star chart, but still could've meant anything. A lot of ancient tribes would navigate by the stars so for all they knew those markings were the guides to an ancient McDonald's. But no, they chose to believe it was space aliens. They even flat out admitted it was merely what they believed. Not a theory, not a hypothesis, a belief. No sane person would fund an expensive space mission based on a belief which is probably why it was funded by a dieing old corporate CEO instead of a government grant or something. Also I don't care how desperate you are, you don't throw proper scientific protocol out the window. "Derr let's run an electrical current through this dead alien head and see what happens." None of the supposed scientists actually behave like scientists. Like Film Brain aka Mathew Buck pointed out it seemed like Ridley Scott was trying to recreate the dynamic of the original Alien, but it doesn't work because these are supposed to be trained scientists not space truckers like in the original Alien.
Also why the hell did they wait to brief everyone until they got there? I would think they'd do that before they left.

EDIT: Pardon the double post. I meant to put both this and my reply to december_king in one post, but I screwed it up.

Canadamus Prime:
snippy

Oh absolutely. The movie is rife with narrative logical flaws.

Exley97:

1. I personally didn't feel like he was faulting fans of the film, and as I stated in the previous post, the characters DID at stupidly -- I just think that was part of the point of the movie.

2. I addressed some of the stupidity in the previous post alread. But about the juggernaut crash and Shaw/Vickers....I thought that 1) the ship was so goddamn huge that they couldn't properly gauge what it was doing/where it was moving at first, and 2) they ran in that direction because if they decided to turn left, for example, and the ship stopped rolling and fell to the left, they were fucked, and vice versa. I mean....the sonofabitch was HUGE [Parker voice] and on the ground, it would have been tough to figure out how wide/tall it was, how fast it was rolling, etc., whereas the audience had the overhead view and could see that, yeah, Vickers was gonna get crushed.

3. Lastly....I've written this before, but what the hell, we're on a roll here -- the questions about Prometheus are absolutely worth asking, but I also think similar questions are worth asking about Alien/Aliens (and the latter is my favorite movie of all time, for the record). For example, why does the flipping science officer of the Nostromo, presumably the best person to investigate an alien spacecraft, stay behind while the captain, first officer and navigator go off to investigate? Why does Ripley go back for her stupid cat? Why does Weyland Yutani tell the Hadley's Hope colony to go check out the Alien ship after Ripley has told them what's inside the ship, and why do they send a mom & pop scouting team WITH THEIR KIDS to check it out (Director's Cut)? Why do they even build a colony on Acheron in the first place if the juggernaut beacon is still active (yes, I know Alien: Isolation addresses this retroactively, but still)? And why oh why do the Colonial F---ing Marines go down to the planet without leaving ANYONE back on the Sulaco in case they need a rescue? Now THAT is fucking stupid....

1. I wasn't taking direct offense. I also realize that the characters were acting dumb. And though I didn't arrive at exactly the same conclusion as yourself, as I focused more on the visuals and just enjoyed the ride, your take-away still resonates with me..

2. The crash- yes, you raise a good point. We were privy to angles at several times during that sequence that provided the illusion that it was a simple matter to avoid the falling vessel. Which, would actually be ridiculous and panicked, as it kinda was.

3. I'll not get into these points you've made, as nostalgia has enhanced my appreciation of these flaws (though, I did think the colony on LV-426 was allowed to proceed because the company wanted the alien to receive viable hosts- and I haven't played Alien:Isolation to any great degree, as I've been too poor to play much AAA fare for a while now).

Exley97:
Why does Weyland Yutani tell the Hadley's Hope colony to go check out the Alien ship after Ripley has told them what's inside the ship, and why do they send a mom & pop scouting team WITH THEIR KIDS to check it out (Director's Cut)?

WY didn't send them. That was Burke acting on his own. He wanted the fame and fortune. Which is why he was so nervous when Ripley threatened to expose him. He was just sent because it was an expensive colony. The WY execs didn't believe Ripley. They went with their kids because they weren't told what they were searching for.

Ezekiel:
WY didn't send them. That was Burke acting on his own. He wanted the fame and fortune. Which is why he was so nervous when Ripley threatened to expose him. He was just sent because it was an expensive colony. The WY execs didn't believe Ripley. They went with their kids because they weren't told what they were searching for.

THIS!!!

Oh my god thank you!!!

I'm not blaming the person you're replying to but in Aliens it isn't Wayland Yutani that's sending colonists into the ship to try and get infected, it's Carter Burke. Wayland Yutani don't know or believe that the alien ship and the eggs are real, the idea of getting colonists infected and recovering a sample is from Burke because it'd be 'worth billions to the bioweapon industry', much as WY are portrayed as the typical evil corporation in pop culture as far as I can tell they're not actually involved at a corporate level at all. I also don't think Burke had any intention of turning the sample over to the company, from what you can infer from the film Wayland Yutani is a terraforming and energy supply company, they almost certainly don't have a bioweapons division so his buyer is probably another company.

Zhukov:
*cracks knuckles*

Warhammer, both fantasy and 40K but especially the latter, is a miserable waste of its few good ideas.

All that potential and all they can do with it is frantically jerk off the various super-soldiers with Super Special Weapons.

Also, the fluff is garbage written largely (if not entirely) by people who couldn't make it as authors in their own right.

Clearly you have never read Skarsnik :P

But yeah that's what happens when you have a revolving door of writers, Comic Books are guilty of this tenfold.

But as for my unpopular opinion, I think Blade Runner is not only Overrated, but just plain bad and other Sci-Fi even of its own genre of Cyberpunk already exceeded Blade Runner.

OK.... let's get really unpopular.

Rick and Morty is aimlessly overrated and shrivels in comnparison to many other 201X Cartoons.
Legend of Korra was a pretty good continuation of the first series.
Fallout 4 is better then what most people shout about.
Frank Herberts Dune is a more dull read then any other book I own; where I desperadly want the bad guy to win.
Social Media is the plague of our time, that we know no one can get rid of.
Game of Thrones is just The Bold and the Beautiful in a fantasy setting with more death.

Mulholland Drive sucks

Flashpoint is overrated

Spider-Man: Homecoming was underwhelming and okay at best.

Batman Forever is probably my favorite of the 1989-1997 live action Batman films. (Note: its not my favorite Batman film or live action Batman film, but mainly from that period.)

I don't like the first Mad Max

Hawki:
Most unpopular eh? Hmm...Okay. Here's one...

The Empire Strikes Back is the weakest Star Wars OT film.

That's cool. I find the Force Awakens my 2nd favorite Star Wars film and love it

Natemans:

Hawki:
Most unpopular eh? Hmm...Okay. Here's one...

The Empire Strikes Back is the weakest Star Wars OT film.

That's cool. I find the Force Awakens my 2nd favorite Star Wars film and love it

None of the Star Wars movies were good, the Expanded Universe stories of Star Wars that have nothing to do with the Skywalker movies are vastly superior.

Best one of all is the Old Republic Era and SWTOR perfectly captures what Star Wars should be:

image

Samtemdo8:

Natemans:

Hawki:
Most unpopular eh? Hmm...Okay. Here's one...

The Empire Strikes Back is the weakest Star Wars OT film.

That's cool. I find the Force Awakens my 2nd favorite Star Wars film and love it

None of the Star Wars movies were good, the Expanded Universe stories of Star Wars that have nothing to do with the Skywalker movies are vastly superior.

Best one of all is the Old Republic Era and SWTOR perfectly captures what Star Wars should be:

image

The MMORPG was fine I guess and I was kinda disappointed with the Old Republic books. Revan sucked, Deceived was alright I guess, Annihilation I kinda liked and Fatal Alliance was kinda mediocre imo.

Personally my favorite part of the EU was Star Wars: Legacy. That was an amazing comic run by John Ostrander.

Natemans:

Samtemdo8:

Natemans:

That's cool. I find the Force Awakens my 2nd favorite Star Wars film and love it

None of the Star Wars movies were good, the Expanded Universe stories of Star Wars that have nothing to do with the Skywalker movies are vastly superior.

Best one of all is the Old Republic Era and SWTOR perfectly captures what Star Wars should be:

image

The MMORPG was fine I guess and I was kinda disappointed with the Old Republic books. Revan sucked, Deceived was alright I guess, Annihilation I kinda liked and Fatal Alliance was kinda mediocre imo.

Personally my favorite part of the EU was Star Wars: Legacy. That was an amazing comic run by John Ostrander.

I just mean the overall "War" feel of the game especially the potrayal of the Republic/Jedi vs the Empire/Sith.

It just feels more intreaguing and more "War" than how say the Original Trilogy portrays its war between the Empire and the Rebellion.

Never really cared for Citizen Kane or 2001.

Liked the new Ghost Busters, hated Rogue 1. It's not that uncommon an opinion, unless you have my circle of friends.

I don't care for Shadow of the Colossus.

For a while my opinion of it was "foaming at the mouth hatred" but only because I'd been pushed there by people who wouldn't hear an unkind word about the game and told me to go back to Halo if SotC's depth scared me so bad (except I don't like Halo either). But after some time away from people like that, plus playing a game so godawful I don't even want to name it making me look back on several other game's I'd slagged off, including SotC, and think "I was being way too hard on that game" I look at it as an ambitious idea that just didn't work.

For starters, I think it looks like shit. Granted, I can see how the game could have been pretty if they'd spent more time and system resources getting the grids off everything instead of seeing how high they could crank the bloom. Also, I felt like most of my conflict in the game was not with the colossi, but the camera that prioritizes epic angles that look great in screenshots over letting you tell what the fuck you're doing.

As for the game itself, I spent the entire time playing it feeling like it was trying to manipulate me. First it dumps this "our hero is sad and trying to revive his dead girlfriend who was non-specifically sacrificed, FEEL FOR HIM AND HIS LOVE!" Why? The kid has all the personality of a dial tone and the colossi are nonthreatening, so why should I give a crap about him or his plight?

Wait, did I just call the colossi "nonthreatening"? Why yes! First, the game has regenerating health. Why should I feel at all threatened by these things when if I ever take damage from one, I can park the wanderer in an area where it can't get to him so he can suck his thumb while I leaf through the manual of another game? Except for that second lion boss that'll pin you in a corner, tackle you to the ground, then tackle you again just as soon as you stand up. He can kiss my ass.

Second, only two displayed any intelligence beyond a robot programmed to either piddle around and maybe take a swipe at the punk trying to climb it, or "DESTROY! DESTROY!", and they were both killed by something out of a Tom and Jerry sketch.

And third, huge bosses are a staple of video games, so meh. And even on the scale of some of these things, the biggest boss I've seen in a video game is the first boss of MDK2, and as a bonus it doesn't choke the PS2's framerate in the Armageddon version.

"Well, maybe they weren't intended to be intimidating so you'd feel like you were stabbing animals that were minding their own business". Again, far as I was concerned I was stabbing robots. Real animals wouldn't try to shake the wanderer off in such rhythmic intervals, and would take more drastic measures to get rid of him such as staying underwater or scraping him off on a cliff. But on top of being a bitch to program, if they had any preservation instinct they'd be unkillable, screwing over the whole "video game" aspect.

So, okay, let's look at the colossi strictly as video game boss battles; they're irritating. Granted, most of my aggro fighting these things was coming from the camera constantly ripping control from me. But most of the fights felt like they were testing not my intelligence or skill, but my patience. The sea serpent that circles around a lake occasionally skimming the surface, but the depth perception is so screwy I could never quite tell where it was surfacing and you have to avoid its lightning spikes, so it takes forever to finally get on the damn thing (and once you finally get on, stab out its lightning spikes, and reach the head it'll submerge, forcing you to do this all over again. Then, funnily enough, it lets you kill it the second time). The salamander in the colosseum, where you have to shoot it off the wall and run down some stairs five times to finally deplete its health (though I guess if you just jump down you can take it out in three, since the regenerating health negates the fall damage). Or the sky dragon that tunnels underground every time you stab out one of its three weak points, so you have to bring it down three times for no reason. Another game would make it harder to bring it down the second and third time, but no, just shoot it down the same way three times, because wasting the player's time is the same as challenging them.

tldr: The game's intentions were getting in each other's way.

And the best thing about being told "You just don't get it" is people then coming out to say "It's deliberately vague because you're supposed to take the elements and come up with your own story." Okay, how the hell can anyone "not get it" if you're supposed to interpret it however you want.

Canadamus Prime:

Exley97:

Canadamus Prime:

I'm not going to fault anyone for enjoying Prometheus, but you do realize that you have a film about a trillion dollar space mission manned by a crew of morons essentially based on cave drawings and blind faith, and helmed by the worst scientists in the history of man. Also it's backed by Mr. Weyland because of the vague promise of extending his life.

I do realize it, and I didn't bother me (well, except for the aforementioned Millburn business with the snake thing). I think the characters acting recklessly and foolishly in Prometheus is a feature, not a bug, as the saying goes. The movie is about people reaching for and misusing power, and then paying the consequences for that behavior (whether it's the human scientists or the engineers who fucked around with the black goo and got wacked by their own creations). Weyland is desperate to extend his life, so he doesn't care how much money he wastes or who is put in danger -- he'll risk it all on a longshot. Shaw and Holloway are desperate to prove their theory and their life's work is correct, and they'll risk life and limb (jumping into an oncoming storm to save a severed engineer head, taking your biosuit helmet off becaue you're SO convinced the engineers are real and breathed oxygen that you'll take that risk) in order to validate that. I'm not saying they're NOT acting stupid -- they are -- I'm saying I understand *why* they're acting stupid, and I think it's in keeping with the theme of the movie.

As I stated Shaw and Holloways theories were based on cave drawings. These dots on a wall just so happen to match up with a star chart, but still could've meant anything. A lot of ancient tribes would navigate by the stars so for all they knew those markings were the guides to an ancient McDonald's. But no, they chose to believe it was space aliens. They even flat out admitted it was merely what they believed. Not a theory, not a hypothesis, a belief. No sane person would fund an expensive space mission based on a belief which is probably why it was funded by a dieing old corporate CEO instead of a government grant or something. Also I don't care how desperate you are, you don't throw proper scientific protocol out the window. "Derr let's run an electrical current through this dead alien head and see what happens." None of the supposed scientists actually behave like scientists. Like Film Brain aka Mathew Buck pointed out it seemed like Ridley Scott was trying to recreate the dynamic of the original Alien, but it doesn't work because these are supposed to be trained scientists not space truckers like in the original Alien.
Also why the hell did they wait to brief everyone until they got there? I would think they'd do that before they left.

EDIT: Pardon the double post. I meant to put both this and my reply to december_king in one post, but I screwed it up.

Sorry, getting to this a bit late...and please apologize the snark.
1. I know they're basing their *belief* on *cave drawings* because the movie SAYS that, and the characters are in fact called out on it (by the late duo of Fifield and Millburn). Again, I'm not saying they're NOT reaching, or they're NOT acting foolishly. I just think that's part of the point of the movie. They're obsessed, and obsessed people do foolish things.
2. Pretty sure it's NOT a map to McDonalds. I think you're underselling this a bit, especially since they explain the acient civilizations that had the pictogram were separated "by centuries" and had no recorded contact with one another.
3. On your "no sane person" point -- that's exactly what I'm saying. Weyland is obsessed with extending his life and he doesn't care how far he has to go.
4. You're saying that no scientist would ever break scientific protocol *in movies*, which feels a tad unreasonable and austere (I hae to imagine that scientists do in fact make mistakes, act recklessly and occasionally break protocol even in this day and age). And yes, I've heard all of the "Space truckers can act stupid, but scientists can't" arguments/videos/memes, and I have no issue with you or anyone else applying the Neil deGrasse Tyson approach to this movie. Fine. But I think that's a little over the top, and I'm not sure why we don't have videos and memes questioning why other professions act stupidly and break their respective protocols in movies so often.
5. To your point on the briefing, it's never explained in the movie but I assume that Weyland wanted to keep the mission a secret so he could monopolize whatever he found, and the team members besides Shaw and Holloway who had no idea what the mission was about probably went along with it because they were paid a hell of a lot (Fifield alludes to this in his comment about being there "for money") and...maybe they probably weren't the world's best scientists either. That's a guess on my part, of course. I'm not sure how many field or subject matter experts would agree to such a mission, shrouded in secrecy, millions of miles away to an unknown destination, so maybe these guys were the B team. Again, it's just a guess.

EscapistAccount:

Ezekiel:
WY didn't send them. That was Burke acting on his own. He wanted the fame and fortune. Which is why he was so nervous when Ripley threatened to expose him. He was just sent because it was an expensive colony. The WY execs didn't believe Ripley. They went with their kids because they weren't told what they were searching for.

THIS!!!

Oh my god thank you!!!

I'm not blaming the person you're replying to but in Aliens it isn't Wayland Yutani that's sending colonists into the ship to try and get infected, it's Carter Burke. Wayland Yutani don't know or believe that the alien ship and the eggs are real, the idea of getting colonists infected and recovering a sample is from Burke because it'd be 'worth billions to the bioweapon industry', much as WY are portrayed as the typical evil corporation in pop culture as far as I can tell they're not actually involved at a corporate level at all. I also don't think Burke had any intention of turning the sample over to the company, from what you can infer from the film Wayland Yutani is a terraforming and energy supply company, they almost certainly don't have a bioweapons division so his buyer is probably another company.

True, it was Burke who made the request to Hadley's Hope ("signed Burke, Carter J.!!!!"). I just have a hard time thinking Burke was acting totally alone at that point. Yes, the WY committee investigating the Nostromo incident showed no signs that they believed Ripley, and Van Leuwen even tells her they don't have to check out the planet because of the colony there. But if WY as a company is THAT ambitious and is willing to reroute a commercial towing vehicle in ALIEN to investigate a *possibe* life form on LV-426, then it seems like an *actual* human sighting of an alien lifeform would indeed move them to investigate. I mean, if you're going to program every ship in the fleet to stop on a dime and investigate possible signs of alien life, then why wouldn't you at least tell your folks on Acheron to check out a reported and potentially dangerous alien life form? I may be reaching but I always felt that committee was a put on, and that as soon as it was over, they were huddling to figure out how to check out the planet and potentially capitalize on what was there, if anything.

Also, I'm not sure what evidence there was suggest Burke was willing to turn on the company when he says flat out that the facehuggers are worth millions to WY's bioweapons division. But maybe you're right. Burke was shifty.

Here's more!

I didn't like the new Mad Max movie all that much. The action was great I guess, but I can't enjoy that if the story doesn't pull me in, which it did not. The beginning was alright, but that fades once they decide to go back to the base (whatever it's called), because from that moment on, I knew exactly how the rest of that movie was going to play out to the point where continuing to watch it was almost pointless. The movie just basically ended there, and for all the fights and the big chase and a guy with a guitar flame thrower... it was boring.

The Shining. Everyone loves that movie, and Stanley Kubrick is supposed to be a genius, but I couldn't take it seriously. Nicholsons character doesn't turn crazy, he's just crazy from the beginning, and it seemed goofy to me. What's probably worse though, this is one of these movies where you could tell that it's an adaptation even if you've never heard of the book, because all the elements get set up so clumsily. It just screams in your face that "yeah all this probably came together organically in some book somewhere but we don't have time so here's a boy who sees things and he has a weird finger and a crazy dad and now they're off to some hotel or some shit". The way this movies gives away the fact that it's an adaptation is like an episode of South Park, where you don't always know exactly what's being parodied right now, but it's so spot on that you laugh anyway.

Breaking Bad is about as exciting as watching tapioca slowly congeal.

tippy2k2:
I cannot speak for others who liked it but for myself, the illusion of choice that is done well works just as well for me. Maybe what I felt should happen and what the game had happen just so happened to work out to something that made sense but as long as the game did a good enough job into tricking me into thinking my choices mattered, I'm perfectly fine with it.

Hell, Telltale games are some of my favorite games and their entire schtick is to trick the players into thinking that their choices mattered toward the story.

The cinematics shattered any illusion of choice I had about the game. I just couldn't look at them and see the choice I had just made reflected in them. If I could only see in black and white I wouldn't be able to tell them apart.

I guess the one thing the shipped endings got right was keeping people talking about them. There is something to be said for that I suppose.

There's a running joke at the place I work about how many times I've played through the first two seasons of the Walking Dead. No matter how many times I've played I still hammer the button, or the screen, to try and get Lee to stand up at the end.

Exley97:

Canadamus Prime:
SNIP

Sorry, getting to this a bit late...and please apologize the snark.
1. I know they're basing their *belief* on *cave drawings* because the movie SAYS that, and the characters are in fact called out on it (by the late duo of Fifield and Millburn). Again, I'm not saying they're NOT reaching, or they're NOT acting foolishly. I just think that's part of the point of the movie. They're obsessed, and obsessed people do foolish things.
2. Pretty sure it's NOT a map to McDonalds. I think you're underselling this a bit, especially since they explain the acient civilizations that had the pictogram were separated "by centuries" and had no recorded contact with one another.
3. On your "no sane person" point -- that's exactly what I'm saying. Weyland is obsessed with extending his life and he doesn't care how far he has to go.
4. You're saying that no scientist would ever break scientific protocol *in movies*, which feels a tad unreasonable and austere (I hae to imagine that scientists do in fact make mistakes, act recklessly and occasionally break protocol even in this day and age). And yes, I've heard all of the "Space truckers can act stupid, but scientists can't" arguments/videos/memes, and I have no issue with you or anyone else applying the Neil deGrasse Tyson approach to this movie. Fine. But I think that's a little over the top, and I'm not sure why we don't have videos and memes questioning why other professions act stupidly and break their respective protocols in movies so often.
5. To your point on the briefing, it's never explained in the movie but I assume that Weyland wanted to keep the mission a secret so he could monopolize whatever he found, and the team members besides Shaw and Holloway who had no idea what the mission was about probably went along with it because they were paid a hell of a lot (Fifield alludes to this in his comment about being there "for money") and...maybe they probably weren't the world's best scientists either. That's a guess on my part, of course. I'm not sure how many field or subject matter experts would agree to such a mission, shrouded in secrecy, millions of miles away to an unknown destination, so maybe these guys were the B team. Again, it's just a guess.

Oh no worries.
1) Maybe that was one of the themes of the movie, but Shaw and Holloway were still not believable scientists. Actually I believe your're right and faith and belief were among the main themes of the movie because it made a big deal about how Shaw was a Christian and held on to that despite discovering evidence that contradicted her Christian beliefs. However it doesn't handle it's themes very well when near the end of the movie Shaw asks for her cross necklace back and David asks why she still clings to her faith after all she's been through and she flat out ignores the question. Uh no movie (and by extension Ridley Scott), if you're not going to address the issue don't bring it up.
2) Obviously it wasn't a map to a McDonald's, my point was they were making a lot of assumptions.
3) He must have been really really really really desperate because he's banking on a)Shaw and Halloway's theory being right b)The Engineers still being there after thousands of years and c)The Engineers actually being able and willing to help him. The odds of that being roughly 0.000000001%. I wouldn't bet on those odds.
4) Ok maybe movie scientists are more inclined to break protocol than real life scientists. Also I never said that scientists can't act stupid or make mistakes. What I did say was that I think Ridley Scott was trying to recreate the same character dynamic as the original Alien, but it doesn't work because these are supposed to be trained scientists not jaded space truckers.
5) Ok maybe it was supposed to all super ultra top secret or whatever, but it would've been nice if they explained that. That one though is only a very minor criticism. Although I will say that Fifield must have been one hell of a jaded scientist if he was only doing it "for the money."

Exley97:

EscapistAccount:

Ezekiel:
WY didn't send them. That was Burke acting on his own. He wanted the fame and fortune. Which is why he was so nervous when Ripley threatened to expose him. He was just sent because it was an expensive colony. The WY execs didn't believe Ripley. They went with their kids because they weren't told what they were searching for.

THIS!!!

Oh my god thank you!!!

I'm not blaming the person you're replying to but in Aliens it isn't Wayland Yutani that's sending colonists into the ship to try and get infected, it's Carter Burke. Wayland Yutani don't know or believe that the alien ship and the eggs are real, the idea of getting colonists infected and recovering a sample is from Burke because it'd be 'worth billions to the bioweapon industry', much as WY are portrayed as the typical evil corporation in pop culture as far as I can tell they're not actually involved at a corporate level at all. I also don't think Burke had any intention of turning the sample over to the company, from what you can infer from the film Wayland Yutani is a terraforming and energy supply company, they almost certainly don't have a bioweapons division so his buyer is probably another company.

True, it was Burke who made the request to Hadley's Hope ("signed Burke, Carter J.!!!!"). I just have a hard time thinking Burke was acting totally alone at that point. Yes, the WY committee investigating the Nostromo incident showed no signs that they believed Ripley, and Van Leuwen even tells her they don't have to check out the planet because of the colony there. But if WY as a company is THAT ambitious and is willing to reroute a commercial towing vehicle in ALIEN to investigate a *possibe* life form on LV-426, then it seems like an *actual* human sighting of an alien lifeform would indeed move them to investigate. I mean, if you're going to program every ship in the fleet to stop on a dime and investigate possible signs of alien life, then why wouldn't you at least tell your folks on Acheron to check out a reported and potentially dangerous alien life form? I may be reaching but I always felt that committee was a put on, and that as soon as it was over, they were huddling to figure out how to check out the planet and potentially capitalize on what was there, if anything.

Also, I'm not sure what evidence there was suggest Burke was willing to turn on the company when he says flat out that the facehuggers are worth millions to WY's bioweapons division. But maybe you're right. Burke was shifty.

I'm annoyed that you're even disputing what I'm saying. More than usual.

I found Heath Ledgers version of the joker to be utter garbage, constantly focusing on how he doesn't have a plan when he is going through a sprawling plan, taking a downright systematic approach to try and break batman.

The only thing Joss Whedon has done that I liked was the first avengers, I find everything else in his body of work to be just awful.

I don't find Steve Carell funny in any comedy he's been in. Same goes for Zach Galifianakis.

I find the majority of young adult fiction nowadays to be utter drivel that stunts the imaginations of modern youth.

I don't like playing multiplayer PvP, but immensely enjoy multiplayer PvE

Star Wars Galaxies was the best mmorpg on the market, while SWTOR is one of the worst. SWTOR managed to kill both initial (well written universe) KotOR franchise and SWG, just to stumble over its childish story, plastic characters, another-wow-killer style gameplay and bland, cookie cutter systems year after. Crapped itself with f2p and wiggles mummbling 'gives me your moneysssss' ever since, pretending it's 'Star Wars'.

Given above atrocity
plus crappy, cattle fodder, 'this-summer-on-big-screen' level of all non-Lucas SW movies pandering to lowest common social media induced denominator, pop-culture obeying, facebook brainwashed, pc indoctrinated and principles and concious thought -less consumers recent actions of EA were just logical 'next step'. They just pulled the trigger too early or unlike Blizzard, harvested too savagely.

Exley97:

Also, I'm not sure what evidence there was suggest Burke was willing to turn on the company when he says flat out that the facehuggers are worth millions to WY's bioweapons division. But maybe you're right. Burke was shifty.

My main reason for thinking this is that Burke starts throwing around talk of becoming very wealthy to Ripley, when if he were working on company instructions you'd think there would be, if anything at all, a disproportionately tiny bonus in it for him. The way he talks about the facehuggers implies he's selling them rather than procuring them for the company, plus to be honest if the bioweapons division was aware of them and wanted them you'd think they'd send out a capture team under their control rather than a slapped together response team like they did. It just feels more like a one-man operation than a full on corporate thing.

Canadamus Prime:

Exley97:

SNIP

Oh no worries.
1) Maybe that was one of the themes of the movie, but Shaw and Holloway were still not believable scientists. Actually I believe your're right and faith and belief were among the main themes of the movie because it made a big deal about how Shaw was a Christian and held on to that despite discovering evidence that contradicted her Christian beliefs. However it doesn't handle it's themes very well when near the end of the movie Shaw asks for her cross necklace back and David asks why she still clings to her faith after all she's been through and she flat out ignores the question. Uh no movie (and by extension Ridley Scott), if you're not going to address the issue don't bring it up.
2) Obviously it wasn't a map to a McDonald's, my point was they were making a lot of assumptions.
3) He must have been really really really really desperate because he's banking on a)Shaw and Halloway's theory being right b)The Engineers still being there after thousands of years and c)The Engineers actually being able and willing to help him. The odds of that being roughly 0.000000001%. I wouldn't bet on those odds.
4) Ok maybe movie scientists are more inclined to break protocol than real life scientists. Also I never said that scientists can't act stupid or make mistakes. What I did say was that I think Ridley Scott was trying to recreate the same character dynamic as the original Alien, but it doesn't work because these are supposed to be trained scientists not jaded space truckers.
5) Ok maybe it was supposed to all super ultra top secret or whatever, but it would've been nice if they explained that. That one though is only a very minor criticism. Although I will say that Fifield must have been one hell of a jaded scientist if he was only doing it "for the money."

1. I see your point here, and others have expressed a similar view. They could have done more on this angle, but I actually thought the end of the movie handled it well. At that point, there really is no answer to the question other than the necklace, and her faith, are pretty much all that Shaw has left.
2. Absolutely, lots of assumptions
3. I mean, Weyland WAS dying, so what difference does it make at that point to risk his fortune and reputation and whatever life he has left? If there's even that slim of a chance, and you have the means to explore that chance, then why not?
4. Totally understandable, though having listened to the director/screenwriters commentary on the film (yes, I'm one of those people) I don't think that's what Scott was going for (at least consciously).
5. Well, Fifield does smoke inside his space suit, so I'm not sure how sharp he was.

EscapistAccount:

Exley97:

SNIP

My main reason for thinking this is that Burke starts throwing around talk of becoming very wealthy to Ripley, when if he were working on company instructions you'd think there would be, if anything at all, a disproportionately tiny bonus in it for him. The way he talks about the facehuggers implies he's selling them rather than procuring them for the company, plus to be honest if the bioweapons division was aware of them and wanted them you'd think they'd send out a capture team under their control rather than a slapped together response team like they did. It just feels more like a one-man operation than a full on corporate thing.

Fair point, especially about sending a capture team. This is total speculation, but maybe WY didn't have the authority to do that at first and had to allow the actual military to investigate it before sending a response team of their own. Looking at it from Burke's perspective, it does seem like something he could, and even would, do. But I look at it from the overal WY perspective, and it's just tough to see how they would pass up such a big chance like that just because they're pissed Ripley blew up one of their towing ships.

EDIT: On a somewhat related note, here's something that's been bugging for YEARS about Aliens -- we're told by Burke that Earth has lost contact with the colony. Okay. But....when? It's clear when the Marines arrive, the colony had at least some time to assess the situation after Newt's father was first attacked. They even were able to capture and secure two live facehuggers. In other words, the aliens didn't take over the colony in a blink of an eye. So why didn't Hadley's Hope contact WY on earth and tell them what they had found? Or did they, and we just never knew it? (Note: I'm going off the movies only here, not the spin-off novels)

Mass Effect Andromeda was a fun game.

Spiderman 3 isn't terrible.

Military FPSes are the least interesting gaming genre.

Disney's corporate overlords make some excellent decisions.

Exley97:

Canadamus Prime:

Exley97:

SNIP

Oh no worries.
1) Maybe that was one of the themes of the movie, but Shaw and Holloway were still not believable scientists. Actually I believe your're right and faith and belief were among the main themes of the movie because it made a big deal about how Shaw was a Christian and held on to that despite discovering evidence that contradicted her Christian beliefs. However it doesn't handle it's themes very well when near the end of the movie Shaw asks for her cross necklace back and David asks why she still clings to her faith after all she's been through and she flat out ignores the question. Uh no movie (and by extension Ridley Scott), if you're not going to address the issue don't bring it up.
2) Obviously it wasn't a map to a McDonald's, my point was they were making a lot of assumptions.
3) He must have been really really really really desperate because he's banking on a)Shaw and Halloway's theory being right b)The Engineers still being there after thousands of years and c)The Engineers actually being able and willing to help him. The odds of that being roughly 0.000000001%. I wouldn't bet on those odds.
4) Ok maybe movie scientists are more inclined to break protocol than real life scientists. Also I never said that scientists can't act stupid or make mistakes. What I did say was that I think Ridley Scott was trying to recreate the same character dynamic as the original Alien, but it doesn't work because these are supposed to be trained scientists not jaded space truckers.
5) Ok maybe it was supposed to all super ultra top secret or whatever, but it would've been nice if they explained that. That one though is only a very minor criticism. Although I will say that Fifield must have been one hell of a jaded scientist if he was only doing it "for the money."

1. I see your point here, and others have expressed a similar view. They could have done more on this angle, but I actually thought the end of the movie handled it well. At that point, there really is no answer to the question other than the necklace, and her faith, are pretty much all that Shaw has left.
2. Absolutely, lots of assumptions
3. I mean, Weyland WAS dying, so what difference does it make at that point to risk his fortune and reputation and whatever life he has left? If there's even that slim of a chance, and you have the means to explore that chance, then why not?
4. Totally understandable, though having listened to the director/screenwriters commentary on the film (yes, I'm one of those people) I don't think that's what Scott was going for (at least consciously).
5. Well, Fifield does smoke inside his space suit, so I'm not sure how sharp he was.

1) In which case it would have been nice to have Shaw actually address the issue by actually answering David's question by saying "It's all I have left." or something like that instead of ignoring the question.
2) So we agree?
3) Sure, but I don't think even the world's most dedicated gambler would bet on those odds.
4) Perhaps not, but some of the characterization seems better suited to the original Alien which had an entirely different setup.
5) They definitely went for the bottom of the barrel in terms of scientists for the voyage that's for sure. Probably because no actually credible scientists would agree to go on their wild goose chase.

EscapistAccount:

Ezekiel:
WY didn't send them. That was Burke acting on his own. He wanted the fame and fortune. Which is why he was so nervous when Ripley threatened to expose him. He was just sent because it was an expensive colony. The WY execs didn't believe Ripley. They went with their kids because they weren't told what they were searching for.

THIS!!!

Oh my god thank you!!!

I'm not blaming the person you're replying to but in Aliens it isn't Wayland Yutani that's sending colonists into the ship to try and get infected, it's Carter Burke. Wayland Yutani don't know or believe that the alien ship and the eggs are real, the idea of getting colonists infected and recovering a sample is from Burke because it'd be 'worth billions to the bioweapon industry', much as WY are portrayed as the typical evil corporation in pop culture as far as I can tell they're not actually involved at a corporate level at all. I also don't think Burke had any intention of turning the sample over to the company, from what you can infer from the film Wayland Yutani is a terraforming and energy supply company, they almost certainly don't have a bioweapons division so his buyer is probably another company.

That and given the infinitely unlikely odds of meeting a complex, predatory alien creature, can you blame them? WY is heartless, as all corporations are... they're not stupid, however. Basically why would execs risk their stock options? Burke might profit, not WY. I'd imagine anybody who stopped Burke, and put him down, and kept the whole sordid affair underwraps would get a nice, fat, Weyland bonus.

After all... the colony was a terraforming firm. It was meant to be s colony project. WY was in that business. Burke had ordered upon Ripley's story to search out specimens in order to profit from the company's projects, not the other way around. When the plan backfired he was still insistent that they couldn't just nuke the site, as Burke knew that it was bad enough losing the colonists due to his unsanctioned pet project... but then losing the terraforming operation altogether in the attempt to use corporate assets for personal gain? He was probably going to end up in a bodybag once he was back...

The whole reason he couldn't trust anyone but himself on the mission in the first place. Going himself meant he was safe from the Corporation in the meantime, while also bagging a xenomorph specimen say; "I know you're angry, but check this out!" That was the only way he could cover up his transmission to the colonista, and potentially score a samplr himself as s bargaining chip if his actions were detected.

There's no other way to properly explain why someone as important as him would be going in the first place. Any two bit Weyland engineer would suffice. But then again they would have discovered his subterfuge AND be the ones to score a xenomorph off the back of his failed machinations.

Addendum_Forthcoming:

There's no other way to properly explain why someone as important as him would be going in the first place. Any two bit Weyland engineer would suffice. But then again they would have discovered his subterfuge AND be the ones to score a xenomorph off the back of his failed machinations.

The corporate response to the situation would probably also be a lot more comprehensive than what was sent. If they really do have a bioweapons division they're not going to respond to reports of a potentially extremely valuable alien life form or reports of thousands of rape-scorpions that create organic buzzsaws with 'ehhh...fuck it, those twenty guys I guess'. You'd expect a kitted out capture team with transport for the aliens, holding pens, restraints and so on,it'd look more like the team from the second Jurassic Park film. What gets sent is a single platoon under the command of a green lieutenant, which feels less like a corporate play and more like the limited resources Burke's personal clout could get.

There's no way Burke would be there either and he certainly wouldn't be in the landing party if it were legitimate, that'd be made up of professionals and he'd either be in orbit or more likely in his office at Gateway. As it is the team has no scientists, no proper briefing, no one seems to know what they're doing, it just doesn't play like a legit outing from a company whose bioweapon division wants those critters. Hell if the bioweapons division were involved they'd probably have listened to what happened to Kane and sent down a party made up mostly of synthetics.

As you say, the only reason for Burke to be there is because he can't tell anyone else what's going on. Burke is a junior exec and director of special projects, directors don't go into hostile situations like that themselves, they have people for that, that's why they're directors. If it were a legitimate operation he'd have access to far better resources than he had.

EDIT: It's also highly unlikely that, if Weyland Yutani's board as a whole knew about the aliens, they'd let Ripley go get a low paying job elsewhere. She'd either be roped into the project or killed to keep her quiet. The fact that she talks to the board, tells them all about the aliens and is allowed to go implies very strongly that they both don't believe her and therefore have no knowledge that the aliens exist.

A few more from me; I think the second Spider-man movie, while not bad, is still a bit over-rated.

Also, I never had an issue with Four Kids' anime dubs. Looking back now, I can understand why people don't like them, but otherwise I don't mind them that much... plus the 2003 Ninja Turtles is probably my favorite of the adaptations (up until a certain season, anyway...)

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here