Your most Unpopular Media Opinion

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The prequels are good movies. Not great, but i think they are worthwhile and interesting in their own right, and honestly the original trilogy is placed on way too high a pedestal, even if they are pretty good movies too

Also, George R R Martin is kind of overrated as a writer. A lot of the things he gives other fantasy authors shit for are acutally not only present, but in some cases also prevalent in his own work, and whenever he tries to depict a non-white, non-european culture it ends up being a mess of orientalistic tropes, something that is not at all helped by how close paralells he tries to draw to real history

Metal Gear Solid 2 is a solid game whose pacing is awful and plot is a fucking mess at the end. Raiden is not nearly as bad as he's often said to be and he's a lot more interesting in MGS2 then the walking DEUS EX MACHINA BREAKDANCING CYBORG MURDER MACHINE he became in MGS4.

OTOH, Rose is really, really obnoxious though and the fact she's apparently Raiden's Perfect GF is kind of disturbing.

Ok I am gonna trigger some Westworld fans here, this show is not good. I am dissapointed, I was expecting something interesting but no, I get Blade Runner meets Terminator meets Cowbows and Aliens.

Seriously?! We are doing the whole, "Humans are flawed, Robotic Humans are the futurez." Skynet plot again?!

Honestly this just enforces my belief we should never make Synthetic Humans with self aware A.I.s at all, and I don't care of what value they possess.

I still occasionally find The Simpsons funny.

Mists of Pandaria was the best time period in World of WarCraft's lifespan, in spite of the stupid pandas.

Alien 3 is a pretty good horror movie. It's not on-par with its predecessors, but it's definitely not deserving of all the crap it gets.

Star Wars would be better if it didn't have the Force or lightsabers. Also, the Y-Wing is cooler than the X-Wing. Big whoop, wanna fight about it?

I honestly believe Star Wars is only beloved because of Episode V (which I can't deny is a good film). If it weren't for Star Wars Episode V, the whole series would be nothing in the modern day; sure, Episode IV would always have it's place in history (it helped revive the Film Industry, which collapsed in the late 60's), but it's nothing special, and people today would apply 'Seinfeld isn't Funny' to the film.

Batman Returns is shit

Rangaman:

  • The Saturn is a good system
  • Liking the Saturn is an unpopular opinion?

    OK, it's not as popular as the PS1/N64 or predecessor Genesis/Mega Drive, nor does it have the cult status of the Dreamcast, but it has its fair share of fans. AFAIK, most of the Saturn-related anger is directed at Sega for badly messing up its chances in myriad ways, not so much the console itself.

    Don did nothing wrong.

    I say this while not thinking I would leave my wife behind (here's hoping my wife would be smarter than this), but it's a wildly held belief that men should literally always be ready to throw his life away at a moment's notice.

    I admit, yes, the programming has got to me and I can't shake it. I did dumb things during drive bys that a 10 year old shouldn't think was his responsibility. But I realize how fucking dumb and sexist it is. We train men to be disposable, and the punch of this scene is "Look at this coward, he didn't throw his life away. What a non-male."

    And I know there's going to be a ton of people who think "It's not about him throwing his life away, it's about him being with his wife." or "They had a responsibility to the kid"

    Well, the wife that didn't value his life or safety at that moment as much as she did for the kid's life and safety. The kid didn't value their lives, either. He knew that he didn't know if he could trust them so he hid. As Husband and Wife, they have a responsibility to each other. This isn't the normal world any more. There isn't peace or civility. There are literal fucking monsters. There's waking up the next day and there's not.

    Like they said before they let the child in, they had a responsibility to protect those in that house, and they didn't. I don't think Don is a hero, and I still even admit, my programming makes me still label him a coward. But he's a coward with his head on straight about the new rules of the world. I don't begrudge him that.

    And before you think I don't value kids, I do. I also believe that if you can't help yourselves, you can't help anyone. They already had two elderly people to care for and a woman who was unhinged who wouldn't accept the fact that her boyfriend was dead. They were already struggling. All they did was kill the house.

    Batman & Robin > The Dark Knight Rises.

    Mad Max: Fury Road is not a good movie, and it baffles me this movie was even nominated for an Oscar.

    Samtemdo8:
    Mad Max: Fury Road is not a good movie, and it baffles me this movie was even nominated for an Oscar.

    I have to second this one.

    I also find myself endlessly puzzled by the popularity of the Nolan Batman films. The first was watchable enough, though nowhere near as good as Burton's, from there they went downhill fairly rapidly.

    Likewise, Wonder Woman wasn't all that good. It was watchable enough, but nowhere near as good as the praises it got at release and seems to get ever since. It certainly wasn't a disaster, it was no BvS, but it didn't seem to have much useful to say (at least nothing that wasn't grossly contradictory like "War, Bad!" Says the woman who comes from a warrior culture that apparently does nothing all day save prepare for war and she herself was created solely to kill the god of war, as well as anyone else that happened to get in her way, making her the apparent embodiment of her people's own personal war...) nor did it seem to add much to the mythos.

    Ditto for Rogue One. Again, I certainly wouldn't say it was bad, it was competent enough if, by its very nature, predictable, but it didn't strike me as being particularly good, interesting, or adding much of anything to the mythos. Honestly if it wasn't for the Darth Vader scene at the end there -- and even that wasn't as impactful as I expected given all the hoorah about it -- I can't imagine anyone even remembering much about it twenty minutes after leaving the theater.

    Then again, I also think that Nickleback, despite the internet's hate boner, is actually pretty good. Not great by any means, but a lot better than the ravening hordes -- most of whom only bah when the rest of the herd does anyway -- give them credit for.

    Myria:

    Samtemdo8:
    Mad Max: Fury Road is not a good movie, and it baffles me this movie was even nominated for an Oscar.

    I have to second this one.

    I also find myself endlessly puzzled by the popularity of the Nolan Batman films. The first was watchable enough, though nowhere near as good as Burton's, from there they went downhill fairly rapidly.

    Likewise, Wonder Woman wasn't all that good. It was watchable enough, but nowhere near as good as the praises it got at release and seems to get ever since. It certainly wasn't a disaster, it was no BvS, but it didn't seem to have much useful to say (at least nothing that wasn't grossly contradictory like "War, Bad!" Says the woman who comes from a warrior culture that apparently does nothing all day save prepare for war and she herself was created solely to kill the god of war, as well as anyone else that happened to get in her way, making her the apparent embodiment of her people's own personal war...) nor did it seem to add much to the mythos.

    Ditto for Rogue One. Again, I certainly wouldn't say it was bad, it was competent enough if, by its very nature, predictable, but it didn't strike me as being particularly good, interesting, or adding much of anything to the mythos. Honestly if it wasn't for the Darth Vader scene at the end there -- and even that wasn't as impactful as I expected given all the hoorah about it -- I can't imagine anyone even remembering much about it twenty minutes after leaving the theater.

    Then again, I also think that Nickleback, despite the internet's hate boner, is actually pretty good. Not great by any means, but a lot better than the ravening hordes -- most of whom only bah when the rest of the herd does anyway -- give them credit for.

    Its mostly because Max is the most purest example of a wooden actor and worse a wooden actor that barely has screentime of his own. Same with the rest of the "good guy" cast. I am most certain that Mel Gibson was a way better Max than whoever this guy was. And the plot felt like a Story where Mad Max was shoehorned in, not a story about Mad Max. You can remove Max and the movie would have been almost the same.

    I thought Wonder Woman was average, and you guys all know that don't think BvS was not the worse thing ever (I have read worse comics).

    Haven't seen Rogue One, but the protagonist was boring by the looks of her, aswell as the rest of the cast.

    Nickleback is just noise for me, something I here as background music in the radios.

    Samtemdo8:
    Mad Max: Fury Road is not a good movie, and it baffles me this movie was even nominated for an Oscar.

    ...You know, I could write an entire novel's worth if I was to go into all the ways I think this is true.

    (In fact, going by all the ranting on the subject I've done, here and elsewhere, I probably have already.)

    But to keep a very, very (very) long story short, my basic problem with it - aside from its apparent belief that explosions are an adequate substitute for telling a cohesive, compelling story - is that it seems to have been made under the impression that what made Mad Max 2/The Road Warrior good was Norma Moriceau's (admittedly amazing) costume designs and the abstract concept of people chasing a truck... as opposed to, you know, the personal journey of the titular character, from lawman to lawless, from someone standing for something bigger than himself to a simple misanthropic wanderer, feeding off others to get through the day, only to eventually discover that no man can in fact be, at the end of the day, an island.

    Oh, and to add another to my list of movie puzzlements, the last Spidey movie. Everyone seemed to love it, I just found it... Serviceable.

    The whole "Aunt May is sexy" thing passed into the creepzone long before they were done, Tony's on-again/off-again/on-again support was more than a tad inexplicable, and the whole "Spidey means well, but is a klutz" thing got real old real fast (depressingly similar to how Barry "On The Spectrum" Alan was (mis)handled in Justice League), but overall it was decent enough.

    It's just that for me personally if it wasn't for the car scene -- an admittedly amazing scene that was mostly carried by Keaton -- I would have pretty much forgotten the movie entirely twenty minutes after it was done.

    As with WW and Rogue One, not a bad movie by any stretch, but I'm at a loss as to why it was so near universally praised.

    Game of Thrones is an atrociously written TV-series and it is becoming more and more apparent that its' writers were saved by being able to draw on Martin's writing in earlier seasons. Once they had to do their own thing, they showed just how mediocre they are and have been consistently taking a shit on the strong foundation the first half of their show created.

    Gethsemani:
    Game of Thrones is an atrociously written TV-series and it is becoming more and more apparent that its' writers were saved by being able to draw on Martin's writing in earlier seasons. Once they had to do their own thing, they showed just how mediocre they are and have been consistently taking a shit on the strong foundation the first half of their show created.

    Is this proof that D&D were always mediocre writers and directors?

    David Beinoff's filmography:

    25th Hour
    Troy
    Stay
    When Nine Lives Rolls Over (as director)
    The Kite Runner
    X-Men Origins: Wolverine.
    Brothers.

    And D.B. Weiss never had any films at all so Game of Thrones was his debut as a Film/Television writer, although we has in Author of a Book called Lucky Wander Boy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucky_Wander_Boy

    Myria:

    Ditto for Rogue One. Again, I certainly wouldn't say it was bad, it was competent enough if, by its very nature, predictable, but it didn't strike me as being particularly good, interesting, or adding much of anything to the mythos. Honestly if it wasn't for the Darth Vader scene at the end there -- and even that wasn't as impactful as I expected given all the hoorah about it -- I can't imagine anyone even remembering much about it twenty minutes after leaving the theater.

    Honestly, for all it's flaws, The reason I like Rogue One is that 1.) It actually focuses on someone other then the Jedi and 2.) It's one of the few times we actually get to see the greyer side of the rebellion and not just the "Rebellion Good, Empire Bad" dynamic that almost every entry has that's getting really fucking boring.

    It's called Star Wars, but the actual war stuff seems to be lacking most of the time. At least Rogue One remembered "Hey, remember when this series was WW2 in space?".

    I also personally got a kick out of Tarkin being the main Villian in Rogue One, mostly because of Pragmatic Villiany(which already puts him ahead of most of the Empire, which seems committed to Stupid Villiany)and the fact I feel like at times that I'm the only one who remembers that he was the Big Bad in the first film and was one of the few people who could talk shit to Vader without getting murdered for it. Almost anyone else would get force choked for so much as looking at Vader the wrong way(or if Vader was having a bad day) but Tarkin was ordering him around and making disparaging comments about being a Force user.

    Dalisclock:

    Honestly, for all it's flaws, The reason I like Rogue One is that 1.) It actually focuses on someone other then the Jedi and 2.) It's one of the few times we actually get to see the greyer side of the rebellion and not just the "Rebellion Good, Empire Bad" dynamic that almost every entry has that's getting really fucking boring.

    I thought I was the only one that felt this way ... Rogue One is pretty much the only Star Wars thing I can think of that actually tackles mature topics with a mature degree of realism and intellectual curiosity. I mean the whole moral philosophy of Star Wars in general is so fucking babyish that naturally it fucks with everything else in the universe.

    Rogue One actually tackles mature relationships to morality in a chaotic and utterly massive galaxy. One that routinely requires cold bloodshed, routine sacrifice to get anything done, and perhaps the Rebellion isn't merely 'good' but merely a natural conflict of the galaxy. One that never really had one place of beginning, nor will ever really end for as long as you have people, good or bad, undermining all capacity to bring concepts of routine order to such a massive thing as a populated galaxy.

    That maybe the Rebellion is not a concept of moral propositions but simnply the natural friction such things as an galactic empire will just automatically have.

    And you know what? Maybe in a populated galaxy with shitloads of different cultures ... maybe, just maybe, we might see Rebels that are just arseholes to people, and the only reason why they're a Rebel is because they pay better, or they just simply hate the Empire for what it did rather than what it represents? Maybe have more criminal Rebels who fight for money in the conflict solely because the Empire broke up their criminal syndicate and there's money to be made in war regardless of where you are in it... who knows?

    The way the Rebellion is painted it's almost as if a religion or personality cult rather than any realistic idea of a whole bunch of people who simply don't like the Empire ort profit from tearing it apart, and maybe that's all the real reasons people will sign up to fight? Maybe Rebels just sign up for the three hots and a cot? Maybe because the Empire classed your gun smuggling operations, of which the Rebels were in receivership, as outlawed and you as fugitives ... so that naturally predicates your operations in protecting your trade against Imperials and the Rebels who now are your primary benefactors for your products and enterprise?

    I can't imagine Han getting all those goods in ANH was simply because the Rebels were gracious enough ... it's almost as if they might be used to enticing the service of more self-interested parties through actively rewarding working with them?

    Gee, IDK ... maybe an entire galaxy with alien species might not have uniform ideas of morality or uniform ideas for fighting or why one fights?

    Is it truly bad a rebel might expect a pay cheque for putting their lives on the line? Sure you can make arguments as to honour and liberation, but that doesn't feed you or your family or help you maintain the tools of your aggression or defence against the Empire. It's almost as if well paid soldiers attract decent talent to sign up ...

    Samtemdo8:

    Is this proof that D&D were always mediocre writers and directors?

    David Beinoff's filmography:

    25th Hour
    Troy
    Stay
    When Nine Lives Rolls Over (as director)
    The Kite Runner
    X-Men Origins: Wolverine.
    Brothers.

    Of all those, When Nines Rolls Over is the only thing that has a thoroughly positive reception, at 9,3 on IMDB. The rest of his work aggregates to slightly over 7. Now, IMDB averages is not the best measure of success, but this is also the man who wrote the train wreck of a plot that was X-Men Origins: Wolverine (which has an inexplicable 6,6 on IMDB) so it sounds about right. When your entire career in movies can be summed up as average, which is what the 7 actually translates too, much as with video games, I think the word Mediocre ("of only average quality, not very good") sums him up nicely.

    Samtemdo8:
    And D.B. Weiss never had any films at all so Game of Thrones was his debut as a Film/Television writer, although we has in Author of a Book called Lucky Wander Boy:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucky_Wander_Boy

    Which should be enough warning signals for anyone to not let the guy become a lead writer for a highly prestigious series with an incredibly developed universe, written by one of the most prolific speculative fiction authors of the last four decades. After one book this guy decided that he was up to the task of adapting the magnum opus of the guy with this bibliography.

    To their credit I think D&D did a great job at adapting Martin's work into a TV-series. The first four seasons are still incredibly television and while they made some mistakes in those early seasons in terms of what they cut and merged, they managed to take this incredibly complex universe with enough characters for about a half dozen ensemble dramas and fit it into a functional adaptation of the the source material that was not only faithful but easy to approach for new comers. They deserve a lot of credit for that.

    That being said, the writing after Season 4 also revealed that neither of the two D's or their other writers have the writing chops to do ASoIaF justice. They bungle pacing, they fuck up characterization, they forget the very rules of the world that they established in previous seasons or they only inconsistently enforce them, they either forget about or fail to refer and reinforce the themes that earlier seasons established and show an increased reliance on brute forcing the narrative so that they can hit the plot points they want to hit to set up the final season (as best exemplified by S7E6 and its' unending barrage of contrivances, disregard for internal consistency and pure idiot balls going around). These are all signs of mediocre writers who are in way over their head.

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