Poll: For those under 35, which era(s) made up most of your childhood?

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Herking:

Samtemdo8:

Early Gen Z Culture well there were great games to come out in that era, but fuck me did cartoons ended up being shitty. Phineas and Ferb and Batman Brave and the Bold can suck a dick.

Wait what. Those shows were quite good. There's worst shows from that era to list.

Sorry none of them come close the quality cartoons of yore:

Well I turn 35 next week, so your thread got posted in the nick of time didn't it?

Anyway I'm obviously the 90's kid right in there, Early Millenial or whatever, 16-bit gaming for the most part (SNES, Megadrive, and a lot of Sierra adventure games on PC). I am still stuck in this era as many of my friends, I still listen to grunge and like 90's Japanese, Italian and German sports cars.

By the time we started getting into Playstation, I was in college already.

I'm core. My upbringing was defined by WCW/WWF wrestling, re-runs of Thunderbirds, Golden Eye, dial-up tones, the lingerie sections of Avon catalogues (you kids have it so easy now!), Jim Carey movies, girl vs boy bands, Harry Potter as it came out, Pokemon cards, yoyos, tazos, bouncing boneheads, the death of Sebbuteo, and foosball tables.

I was born in the 87's therefore I am Early Millennial from that chart.

I remember the olde days of SNES, Transformers and the wacky trends like POGs, slap wrist band and etc!

Avnger:
Pretty sure I never left the late 90s on an emotional/maturity level...

The 90s had that effect on people.

Most of my memory is pretty screwed up and out of order, or flat-out doesn't make sense due to a motorcycle accident I had ... but I can't think of anything truly standing out in the 90s. I think I still have memories of the Wall coming down when I was really young and people going on about it andfor the life on me I didn't understand why it was important.

Both my parents seemed pretty excited.

90s seemed pretty hopeful. 90s was that decade when Australia wasn't actually at war with another country, and we were slowly escaping from the effects of the Black Tuesday crash. So I think it was a case of Australian fortunes turning around.

The 90s to me are kind of a blank slate right up until its end, and a second conflict with Indonesia in the works that threatened to become very bitter.

Born in '97 so it's a mixture of Late Millenial and Early Gen Z. Got plenty of childhood memories associated with both periods.

Addendum_Forthcoming:

Avnger:
Pretty sure I never left the late 90s on an emotional/maturity level...

The 90s had that effect on people.

Most of my memory is pretty screwed up and out of order, or flat-out doesn't make sense due to a motorcycle accident I had ... but I can't think of anything truly standing out in the 90s. I think I still have memories of the Wall coming down when I was really young and people going on about it andfor the life on me I didn't understand why it was important.

Both my parents seemed pretty excited.

90s seemed pretty hopeful. 90s was that decade when Australia wasn't actually at war with another country, and we were slowly escaping from the effects of the Black Tuesday crash. So I think it was a case of Australian fortunes turning around.

The 90s to me are kind of a blank slate right up until its end, and a second conflict with Indonesia in the works that threatened to become very bitter.

They called it the end of history for a reason.

Herking:

They called it the end of history for a reason.

End of history is a bit different though. Depending on how it's used. The 'End of History' is the theoretical point where ideological conventions of examining the interplay of the individual and the greater social fabric, and the capacity for the speed of new ideas and the movement of data into information, outpaces historiographical critique.

Which I think is kind of a fallacy of thought. The various formal schools of historiography still are quite useful despite the age of the Internet, and having simply a faster connection won't changethat.

What will change it is possible posthuman inventions such as the establishment of BCI and neuroprosthetic direct sharing of stimuli on a massive scale. But that will have implications on everything.

In some cases it seems to imply that Western liberal democracy is seemingly the final form of Earth's governments, with no real competition, and thus the end of collective engagement or dissent against it. Which kind of negates things like the end of necessary consumption stress ('post-scarcity'). Or potentially some form of hivemind collective.

And when I say 'hivemind', I don't mean necessarily ruled by one gigantic super-entity, but moreso that the ways we receive and transmit information is no longer from an individual perspective.

Like imagine one person viewing a sunset. No longer needing to have a camera or painting a lanscape to communicate that beauty, but rather digitise and transmit freely as if one were viewing it themselves and noticing, feeling, the effects upon one's psychology ... essentially the erasure of traditional barriers to information transfer and of individuality which leads to a posthuman condition.

Which is not that far away I'm happy to add. Probably by the late point of this century will we start seeing such things become a reality, at least judging from the advances we've made in my field. And if that ever becomes the standard of human existence, Western liberal democracies are completely fucked as we know it.

We might even see the return of monarchs.

Moreover it negates ideas of ideological changes based on changes to geostrategic thought. To begin with it was land, then it was sea, next it will be airspace, and in terms of history geostrategic necessity tends to trump cultural attachments.

I'd say about 1/3 core millennial, 2/3 late millennial. Hercules was the first movie I ever saw in theaters, Tekken 3 and the Pokemon anime remain some the defining things about my childhood, I watched most of my movies still on VHS, the PS1 was the first videogame console I had a firm grasp on (despite never owning one). In short 1998-2004.

Too old to even take part. How sad.

Evonisia:
Born in '97 so it's a mixture of Late Millenial and Early Gen Z. Got plenty of childhood memories associated with both periods.

Early gen Z sucked

Born in 1987. Early and mid millennial eras were my main ones, as I started out with stuff like the NES and flippos. Though I still consider the late millennial era as part of my childhood, as I fondly remember stuff like my Gamecube, gameboy advance, and some of the cartoons. Maybe because I didn't get my first own PC until I was 13 or so, and didn't get my own internet connection until I was 15. (Before that my dad only had a dial up modem I could very rarely use for school stuff.)

Bilious Green:
Too old to even take part. How sad.

Well to be fair, everyone knows our stuff was better. You know, "back in the day."

Just kidding. But seriously, it is funny when Millennials turn up their nose at nostalgia. They are rapidly getting to that point where they realize that it isn't just "something that old people seem to like" and are starting to find out for themselves that it really is just a 'flavor enhancer.' That's a lesson we already learned and it is a little funny watching the kids grow up making the same mistakes we did.

Kyrian007:

Just kidding. But seriously, it is funny when Millennials turn up their nose at nostalgia. They are rapidly getting to that point where they realize that it isn't just "something that old people seem to like" and are starting to find out for themselves that it really is just a 'flavor enhancer.' That's a lesson we already learned and it is a little funny watching the kids grow up making the same mistakes we did.

Yeah, I guess it's part of aging. Eventually we all go through the same process of reminiscing about the past. And millennials are soon reaching that point where really they aren't that young anymore. Though, late 90's gaming is a good era to be nostalgic about. :p

bartholen:
In short 1998-2004.

But your avatar is from Avatar the last airbender, which came out in 2005.

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