Your Top Movies of the Last Decade

Taking a leaf from the top games of the last decade thread, applying it to movies here. Not that by decade I mean the 2010s, so we're talking the 2010-2018 time period.

So, on that note:

10) Viceroy's House
9) The Reluctant Fundamentalist
8) The Wolf of Wall Street
7) Eye in the Sky
6) Zootopia
5) Bridge of Spies
4) The Fencer
3) Blade Runner 2049
2) Gravity
1) The Descendants

So, post, discuss, or...something.

In random order...

Mad Max: Fury Road
Krampus
Arrival
Fantastic Mr. Fox
The Tale of Princess Kaguya
No Country for Old Men
Her
Drive
The Nice Guys
The Hateful Eight

Yeah, I cheated a bit -- I had a hard enough time coming up with 10 as it is.

Honourable mentions go to Zootopia, and Guardians of the Galaxy.

Let Me In
The Crazies
The Conjuring 2
The Taking of Deborah Logan
I Spit on your grave
The Autopsy of Jane Doe
Sicario
Train to Busan
It Follows
Hounds of Love

I guess in order by release...

1.) The Crazies (2010)
2.) Predators (2010)
3.) Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol (2011)
4.) Dredd (2012)
5.) The World's End (2013)
6.) Edge of Tomorrow (2014)
7.) Guardians of the Galaxy (2014)
8.) John Wick (2014)
9.) The Martian (2015)
10.) 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016)

This list was kinda hard to come up with. I actually had to find a list of all movies released from 2010 to now just to remember what movies I actually saw during that period. There really weren't a whole lot I'd put on a general favorites list, not constrained by time period. John Wick, Dredd, and Guardians of the Galaxy probably... the rest...? Ehhh... probably not.

Granted, my all-time favorite movies tend to be from between '75 and '95. John Wick, Dredd, and Guardians of the Galaxy all being love letters to that time period probably isn't a coincidence.

In alphabetical order:

The A-Team
Ant-man
The Avengers
Captain Underpants
Coco
Guardians of the Galaxy volume 1 and 2
Deadpool
Moana
Scott Pilgrim vs the World
Zootopia

...What can I say? I tend to prefer animation, science fiction and action films.

stroopwafel:
Let Me In
The Crazies
The Conjuring 2
The Taking of Deborah Logan
I Spit on your grave
The Autopsy of Jane Doe
Sicario
Train to Busan
It Follows
Hounds of Love

Good choice on It Follows; it's totally in my list as well. Train to Busan was pretty well done, too. I thought I spit on Your Grave was pre-2Ks? If it's a remake, I'd likely pass- revenge pron isn't really my bag (though I thought the first Hostel was a fine example of the genre, as far as I could tell). The Crazies was also quite entertaining to me.

If you haven't seen it yet, I'd like to recommend The Wailing. Someone with a list like yours, I'd like to hear your take on it.

I'll upload my list later when I get a mo.

Only CrazyGirl17 put Zootopia on the list. The rest of you are disqualified.

There hasn't been many outstanding movie of the decade. Winter Solider and Gaurdians of the Galaxy 1 get a little nod, but mainly because they were way better than the average Marvel movie.

But then I don't have a top 10 movies ever. Movies aren't worth it

Lets see.

Mad Max Fury Road
Zootopia
My Little Pony: The movie
Guardians of the Galaxy 2
Captain America Winter Solder
Dredd
Moon
The Nice Guys
Deadpool
Get Out

Worgen:
Lets see.

Mad Max Fury Road
Zootopia
My Little Pony: The movie
Guardians of the Galaxy 2
Captain America Winter Solder
Dredd
Moon
The Nice Guys
Deadpool
Get Out

I didn't like the MLP movie. I couldn't get passed the art style. It was so cheap looking, and the voice over never synced with the mouths. Felt more like a Thunderbird's version of Avengers than an improved concept.

Although I did hear the animation was all done in German, and was dubbed English, so that might be it...

Certified Copy
It's Such a Beautiful Day
The Wolf of Wall Street
Hill of Freedom
The Life of Riley
Phoenix
The Forbidden Room
Chevalier
Sieranevada
Staying Vertical

Something like that? A top 20 would be more comfortable for me probably.

Silentpony:
Only CrazyGirl17 put Zootopia on the list. The rest of you are disqualified.

Ahem:

Hawki:
\
6) Zootopia

3. Mad Max: Fury Road
3. Manchester by the Sea
3. Rush
3. Wind Rises
2. Son of Saul
2. Her
2. Inside Out
2. Blade Runner 2049
1. Killer Joe

Killer Joe is the only genuinely tense movie of this decade that I've seen.

Honorable mentions: Gone Girl, Inception, Noah, Spring Breakers, Hardcore [Henry], The Town, Filth, and Rango.

trunkage:
There hasn't been many outstanding movie of the decade. Winter Solider and Gaurdians of the Galaxy 1 get a little nod, but mainly because they were way better than the average Marvel movie.

But then I don't have a top 10 movies ever. Movies aren't worth it

I mean, wtf are you doing in this thread then?

McElroy:
3. Mad Max: Fury Road
3. Manchester by the Sea
3. Rush
3. Wind Rises
2. Son of Saul
2. Her
2. Inside Out
2. Blade Runner 2049
1. Killer Joe

Killer Joe is the only genuinely tense movie of this decade that I've seen.

Honorable mentions: Gone Girl, Inception, Noah, Spring Breakers, Hardcore [Henry], The Town, Filth, and Rango.

trunkage:
There hasn't been many outstanding movie of the decade. Winter Solider and Gaurdians of the Galaxy 1 get a little nod, but mainly because they were way better than the average Marvel movie.

But then I don't have a top 10 movies ever. Movies aren't worth it

I mean, wtf are you doing in this thread then?

Just getting annoyed. Usually I skip these but forum content has become pretty low lately. I needed my Escapist fix

2010 - Ghost Writer
2011 - La piel que habito (The Skin I Live In)
2012 - Jagten (The Hunt)
2014 - Gone Girl
2015 - Mad Max: Fury Road
2016 - 10 Cloverfield Lane
2016 - Nocturnal Animals
2016 - Paterson
2017 - Dunkirk
2017 - Twin Peaks: The Return

Silentpony:

Worgen:
Lets see.

Mad Max Fury Road
Zootopia
My Little Pony: The movie
Guardians of the Galaxy 2
Captain America Winter Solder
Dredd
Moon
The Nice Guys
Deadpool
Get Out

I didn't like the MLP movie. I couldn't get passed the art style. It was so cheap looking, and the voice over never synced with the mouths. Felt more like a Thunderbird's version of Avengers than an improved concept.

Although I did hear the animation was all done in German, and was dubbed English, so that might be it...

The basic redesigns kinda annoyed me. I mean they are supposed to be like 4 feet tall or so but everything in the movie just is so much bigger then they are. Other then that I loved it, I didn't notice anything with the voice sync like that aside from the oddness of any animation where they have a bit to detailed lip syncing without going a bit further and doing disney lip sync. Granted I've only seen it twice but I've really liked it both times. Sure its got its flaws, like Sia pony is totally unnecessary, Fluttershy did like nothing, the other Princesses again get Worfed, and the last half hour wasn't just the Storm King and Discord insulting each other. But it was still really good.
Plus how can you not love some of the songs?



EDIT: I just remembered that the start of it annoyed me and made me really worried it would suck when I originally saw it. Really not a fan of that stupid 'we got the beat remix.'

Here's what I've loved so far in this decade in really no order...

-Best Marvel movies: Avengers, Guardians, Civil War (cheating with a 3-for-1 but I love those 3)
-John Wick (quite possibly the perfectly paced action movie ever made)
-Logan (what a sendoff to an iconic character and role even though the past movies aren't really good besides like X2)
-Lego Batman (so damn entertaining and funny)
-Ex Machina (some amazing sci-fi)
-The Martian (Matt Damon sciencing the shit out of it)
-Cabin in the Woods (super entertaining horror deconstruction)
-10 Cloverfield Lane (John "fucking" Goodman)
-Django Unchained (Christoph Waltz is so good)
-The Handmaiden (to get a bit artsy and foreign I guess although it is damn great)

the December King:

If you haven't seen it yet, I'd like to recommend The Wailing. Someone with a list like yours, I'd like to hear your take on it.

To be honest I didn't really enjoy that movie that much. I found it kind of slow and it didn't really grab me for whatever reason. Not the biggest fan of genre mixes either. Though, maybe I would have found the police incompetence funnier if I found the horror at the heart of the movie more compelling. I don't know, but Asian horror movies in general don't really do it for me. Like for example Ju-on, The Ring or The Grudge I found them all really boring. I do think their thrillers or more serious dramas are often terrific though. The Korean movie The Chaser is probably my favorite followed closely by Pandora. The latter I found particularly harrowing.

Honorable mention:

Twin Peaks: The Return

Thinking back on the last decade I can't help but note that a lot of my favourite works were television series' rather than films, Twin Peaks: The Return standing as the most significant on them, marking the logical culmination of David Lynch's entire work, continuing a beloved story in a subversive and idiosyncratic way and creating images and visuals that are so unique to the mind of David Lynch that them being shown on television can only be seen as a minor revolution. After it was announced in 2014, if I recall correctly, I sometimes joked that the only reason I'm still alive is because I didn't want to die before I've seen the continuation of Twin Peaks. It was everything I hoped it would be and more. Thank god for David Lynch.

10: Inherent Vice

As it is, Inherent Vice is a reductive adaptation of Thomas Pynchon's weakest novel but it does speak for the genius of Pynchon as well, of course, for the talent of Paul Thomas Anderson that it's still one of the best movies of the past decade. While it never quite reaches the vast, byzantine complexity of the novel it's based on it manages to translate it's major themes, the end of an era, the point, where the rebellious spirit of the flower power generation was destroyed, only for its iconography to be appropriated by the ancient and all powerful forces controlling our society. It's not a perfect movie and it's not a perfect adaptation, I'm very sad that it didn't include the plotline set in Vegas but I'm still very happy it exists. Plus, now that the ice has been broken we might see more Pynchon adaptations somewhere down the line.

9: Speed Racer

There's something to be said for a simple action movie that hits all the right notes, John Wick is one of those, Mad Max: Fury Road another one and I would have almost included it in this list, in the end I decided on Lana and Lily Wachowski's Speed Racer though. An anime adaptation from 2008 (which is why it barely counts for this thread) about drivers competing in absurdly elaborate races on absurdly elaborate courses, bringing images to the screen that seem to be born directly out of a child imagination. As I mentioned before, I almost would have put Fury Road here, for having a lot of the same raw, kinetic energy, so why did I decide on Speed Racer? Maybe because it's childish idealism appeals to me, maybe because it's story about true love for the sport triumphing over capitalist exploitation reasonates with me more, maybe because there's a monkey in it... either way, Speed Racer is one of the most enjoyable action movies I've ever seen, for me on par with the first Star Wars and that we never got a sequel is a tragedy!

8: Scott Pilgrim vs. The World

I have a rather dismissive attitude towards the idea of "pop mythology", I think mythologizing pop culture, or at the very least the relentlessly commercialised, corporate owned type of pop-culture that dominates our society, leads us down towards a path of cynical exploitation, nervertheless Scott Pilgrim is a film that means quite a lot to me. Maybe it's because it doesn't so much mythologize pop culture than applies it to a real life situation, relating the tropes of video games and comic books to what, at it's a heart, is a young adult love story between two young people trying to find what's right for them. It's No More Heroes as imagined by John Green. Nick and Nora's Infinite playlist built around the structure of a Yakuza game. and it's also a really damn good comedy. Edgar Wright is a visionary when it comes to editing and almost every frame of Scott Pilgrim is full of subtle little sight gags and cute references.

7: Moonrise Kingdom

I like Wes Anderson in general, maybe more than he deserves, but his dry humor, warm colours and embrace of sentimentality (rather than treating it as something to be avoided at all costs, like many of his contemporaries do) speak to me in a way that makes me approach his movies maybe a bit less critically than I'd otherwise be. Now, what seperates a good Wes Anderson movie like Royal Tenenbaums, Rushmore, Grand Budapest or indeed this one from a lesser one, like Fantastic Mr. Fox, Darjeeling Limited or Bottle Rocket, it what they have going on beyond their compulsively likeable visual style. With Rushmore it was a well executed coming of age story, with Tenenbaums it was the story of a family reconciling through adversity, in Moonrise Kingdom it's a poetically simple and beautiful tale of young love in a simpler, more idealistic society, starring incredibly talented child actors that make the melancholy as well as the joy of the film come to life.

6: Blade Runner 2049

The original Blade Runner is a movie very dear to my heart, one of my favourite Science Fiction movies in fact, so I approached its late sequel pretty skeptically. I never felt Blade Runner needed to be continued, sure, more stories would have happened in that world but would they be worth seeing? Villeneuve managed to tell one that was and, in fact, managed to make a movie of it that, in many ways, is superior to its predecessors. Both movies ask the question what humanity is, what sentience is and what freedom is and who deserves it. Both do so in an artistically impeccable way. Maybe there's something manipulative to 2049s maximalism, its elaborate setpieces and larger than life vistas, but what is at its core is a story about the slave becoming a man, about self determination in a society that crushes the individual, about a man finding his purpose. It's a beautiful movie and a more than worty followup.

5: Pain and Gain

A movie about american excess by the man whos name is all but synonymous with american excess, Michael Bay, an often underappreciated auteur of Hollywood cinema, stepping away from restrictive franchise film making to create something of actual thematic weight and cultural relevance. Mark Kermode, critic for the BBC described it as "(like)looking into a void-like abyss of blackness, the depth and enormity of which is impossible to comprehend" and he's absolutely right about it. Pain and Gain is offensive. It's ugly. It's one of the few dark comedies that manage to create something genuinely transgressive. Bay looks unflinchingly into the darkness at the heart of american culture, looks at the fast cars, the big mansions, the yachts, the long legged, full lipped strippers with their big breast implants and asks "Isn't this grotesque? Isn't this ugly? Is this was we really want?". Mark Wahlberg turns in a fantastically straight faced performance as the all american psychopath and stars in a movie that is as funny as it's frightening.

4: La Danza de la Realidad

Alejandro Jodorowsky, the old druid, Hollywood's very own mystic, returns to film, turning his own life into myth, adapting his childhood and family life in Chile as the son of jewish immigrants into a tale that is as whimsical as it is mystical, as watchable as it is thoughtful. While La Danza is really more of a movie about Alejandro's father Jaime (in an incredibly inspired twist played by Brontis, his son), a dogmatic member of the communist party with a Stalin mustache and a uniform, what is at its core is still an incredibly human story told through Jodorowskian abstractions. Aside from the (mostly rightfully) overlooked Rainbow Thief it might actually be his most accesible work but that doesn't make it any less valuable as a movie. I have yet to see the sequel, Poesie sin fine, but La Danza de la Realidad marks the return of one of the old master of surrealist cinema to his craft and as it is, it's a thing of pure beauty.

3: Cloud Atlas

Here we go with another Wachowski joint. Cloud Atlas is a master class of juggling common themes and thematic motives between different characters, storylines, time periods and even genres. All these different facettes manage to coalesce into a single narrative that can only be called epic, in the classical sense. Between these stories of overcoming intolerance, of bravely facing discrimination, of securing the existence of yourself and those who care about no matter how much opposition you face, is the story of humanity itself an unending struggle for something greater that the Wachowski sisters and Tom Tykwer manage to bring to the screen in a way that stands shoulder to shoulder with Hollywood's greatest accomplishments. It's a movie of unending ambition, impressive in its scale as well as its executions, the sisters' masterpiece.

2: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice

As superhero movies grow more and more tiresome, the endless bloat of studio driven franchises grows more and more opressive, Zack Snyder and Chris Terrio managed, against all odds, to create a true auteur piece that stands out from its peers like a gemstone among rubble. It's the logical culmination of the entire genre, deconstructivist in it's nature but inspiring in its intent, an artfully shot, artfully written and artfully scored film that elevates the genre to a level it hasn't reached since Richard Donner first brought Superman to the big screen in the late 70s. It manages to bring moral ambiguity, philosophical depth and socio-political relevance to a genre that has too long been dominated by the painfully banal, childish Power Rangers sensiblitities the like of Joss Whedon and Kevin Feige brought to it. It does to the superhero movie what The Good, The Bad and The Ugly did to the western and stands as the genres only true epic.

1: Synecdoche, New York

I wouldn't call it the best movie of all time, not by a long shot, but it managed to do something no other movie ever did: It had me staring at a wall and thinking about my life for about 30 minutes afterit ended. I don't think any other film in history ever managed to encapsulate the deep tragedy of human existence as well as Synecdoche, New York did. How everything we hold dear eventually dissapears in front of our eyes. How we can never fulfill our purpose in life. How we can never be what other people would like us to be and how we grow farther and farther apart from them, trying as we might to live up to their expectations, to be good enough, only so they wont dissapear from our lifes, yet we stand powerless as they do and we wonder just what happened, what we could have done differently, just where we went wrong and we spend our whole life wondering about these things but the answer just doesn't seem to come to us and one day we die, with no other questions on our mind than "Was that really it? Charlie Kaufmann is a genius. Adaptation was great. Anomalisa was great. Synecdoche is transcendent and for me it's by far the best movie of the decade.

 

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