BOULDERDASH, POPPYCOCK, AND PIDDLEPADDLE!!!!

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So what is your favorite old timey word and can you use it in a sentence. Example, "I dare say, the idea of a moving picture is complete boulderdash!"

Edit: I do apologize for my beastly grammar ladies and gents. I believe I meant Balderdash.

I happen to be a fan of the phrase "Oh, pish posh."

No idea where I heard it, but I do say it in real life.

the idea of a man not investing in a proper business venture is complete and udder tomfoolery.

I think you mean "Balderdash" Sir.

This huge error doesn't make you look silly at all.

Poppycock is a favourite, but while it may not count "Bloody hell" has become a regular.

Spiffing!
I also say "jolly good" a lot if that counts.

Poppycock and piffle!
Also "ye olde" is a nice one from time to time.

Wishy-Washy if that counts..

Pretty much any old-timey word.

Verily, dear sir, for thou art an idiot!
Or,
On the contrary, thou art hypocritical!
(see what I did there?)

I'm a fan of 'verily' I don't know why :P

Not sure if its considered an "old timey" word but I love saying Malarkey.

The only time I hear the word is from old timey people.

I tend to say "Oh my" quite a bit. Not sure if that counts but nobody else says it, does it count as old-timey?

Well pip-pip tally ho! Rather, old bean! I'd say this splendid display of vocabulary is absolutely smashing!

Shockolate:
I happen to be a fan of the phrase "Oh, pish posh."

No idea where I heard it, but I do say it in real life.

Didn't Aunt May say "pish posh" in one of the Spider-Man movies?

"Frabjous" is one of my favorite words, as in "frabjous day, kaloo-kalay."

I also concur with others that verily is good.

Oooo A thread about old words! How quaint

LordCuthberton:
I think you mean "Balderdash" Sir.

This huge error doesn't make you look silly at all.

Beat me to it good sir, well done.

OT: I daresay most of these words might be considered normal words to many people, especially Brits getting on in years. 'Verily' though, is definitely old-timey.
So!

I'faith, nuncle, verily thou art truly an atheling, and I kith you, thou art simply the finest man sith erst Man donned cloth.

Crumbs and fiddlesticks, or "Crumbs and fiddlesticks".

I have gotten into a habit of saying "Fare thee well" instead of goodbye "Indeed" instead of yes and if this counts "Curses!" instead of any modern exclamatory swear.

Golly-be-jee-willikers!
At least I think that's how its spelled.

Oh and you can't forget bully. As in using it as an adjective.
"Bully!" "We're having such a bully day!"

Jedamethis:
Snip

He hasn't even edited it yet! Poor boy.

And I do agree, the words in this thread don't seem out of date to me. But then again that's just me.

LordCuthberton:

Jedamethis:
Snip

He hasn't even edited it yet! Poor boy.

And I do agree, the words in this thread don't seem out of date to me. But then again that's just me.

Not just you, I don't doubt many other people would say that too.

Son of a Montague.

Jedamethis:

LordCuthberton:
I think you mean "Balderdash" Sir.

This huge error doesn't make you look silly at all.

Beat me to it good sir, well done.

OT: I daresay most of these words might be considered normal words to many people, especially Brits getting on in years. 'Verily' though, is definitely old-timey.
So!

I'faith, nuncle, verily thou art truly an atheling, and I kith you, thou art simply the finest man sith erst Man donned cloth.

Are you trying to type in French?

I'd have to say Dirigible (Probably spelled that wrong), I mean it's just so fun to say.

I caught myself saying "uncouth" a few times.

Verily, and Scumthorpe.

Mmhmm.

Jedamethis:

LordCuthberton:
I think you mean "Balderdash" Sir.

This huge error doesn't make you look silly at all.

Beat me to it good sir, well done.

OT: I daresay most of these words might be considered normal words to many people, especially Brits getting on in years. 'Verily' though, is definitely old-timey.
So!

I'faith, nuncle, verily thou art truly an atheling, and I kith you, thou art simply the finest man sith erst Man donned cloth.

How did I know you would be here?...

OT; Verily, ergo and fiddlesticks.

I love yelling at those damn Wipper-snappers, Tell 'em what they are I say.

How about Tally-Ho! and Ta-Ta!

I find 50's era slang to be the most entertaining.

I like to use the word "keen" a lot...

I say none of those, unfortunately I'm not British. Just a boring old American :p

kickyourass:

Jedamethis:

LordCuthberton:
I think you mean "Balderdash" Sir.

This huge error doesn't make you look silly at all.

Beat me to it good sir, well done.

OT: I daresay most of these words might be considered normal words to many people, especially Brits getting on in years. 'Verily' though, is definitely old-timey.
So!

I'faith, nuncle, verily thou art truly an atheling, and I kith you, thou art simply the finest man sith erst Man donned cloth.

Are you trying to type in French?

French?!
Sir, your knowledge of Old English is woefully inadequate, if indeed it exists at all!

Mackheath:

Jedamethis:

LordCuthberton:
I think you mean "Balderdash" Sir.

This huge error doesn't make you look silly at all.

Beat me to it good sir, well done.

OT: I daresay most of these words might be considered normal words to many people, especially Brits getting on in years. 'Verily' though, is definitely old-timey.
So!

I'faith, nuncle, verily thou art truly an atheling, and I kith you, thou art simply the finest man sith erst Man donned cloth.

How did I know you would be here?...

Because I love talking fancy :D
I wear my fancypants on my vocal chords!

I believe "yonder" to be the most practical old-timey word. As in, "Go get that cake from over yonder!" and, "The bandits came from over yonder, sheriff!".

VicunaBlue:
I love yelling at those damn Yipper-snappers, Tell 'em what they are I say.

I believe the term is "whipper-snapper", could be wrong though.

Count Igor:
Verily, and Scumthorpe.

Mmhmm.

Scumthorpe? I'm afraid I'm unfamiliar with the word, when do you use it? Ihe closest I know of anything like that is Scunthorpe which is a town over here in England.

What a kenspeckle, ol' pilgarlic twaddlestick.

Okay, I admit, I've no idea what 'twaddlestick' means, but pilgarlic and kenspeckle are two words I know that I really am aware are 'archaic phrases'.

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