Accents and The Escapist!

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So, I've noticed that the forums tend to be pretty diverse, nationality speaking. So, Escapist, what sort of accents do you have? (I thought about a poll, but honestly, there are so many kinds, I'm not even capable of listing half of them)

To kick it off,

I'm from south eastern New Mexico,USA (Before you ask, yes, its a state)

My town is about...10-15 minutes from the Texan border, so everyone here tends to have a bit of a Texan drawl. Nothing like you see on TV/Film, but we do say

"Y'all" (as in, you guys)
"Fixing to" (as in, about to)
and using in' instead of ing
Wantin' oppose to wanting

Now, we put it all together

"What are y'all doin', I'm fixin' to go to the store"

I personally have a typical Southern English RP accent, the amount of formality increasing if I'm talking with strangers and taking on a slight tone of West Country if I'm with friends or family. A lot of people seem to think my accent is "posh" but to me it just sounds normal. Then again people often don't seem to be able to hear their own accent, I've had both a Welsh and American friend be surprised when I tell them they have an accent :-P

What I officially have is called Ottawa Valley Twang. What that actually means is the bastardized child of the Irish, Scottish and Polish settlers accents blended in with generic North American.

However, it also means I have a very good ear for accents, and I can tell apart dialects by intonation, even if I can't identify the dialect by name.

Im from south-east london in England, UK. Im part posh and part cockney.
Posh, everyone knows that, think of any really bad baddie from a james bond film, thats it ;)
Then theres the cockney, for those of you who dont know its the sort of people who say "apples and pears" instead of stairs (eventhough we dont all do that, bloody stereotypes).
But basically, I sound posh until i say any word with a H in it or with a T in it (not at the beginning for T's.)

I say "appy" instead of happy. "Enry" instead of henry. "Twenny" instead of twenty. And my personal favourite (because it sounds so aggressive when you ask for it) Walt ah instead of water. (ive spelt it walt ah becuase there is no letter for the sound there, its basically like saying the name walt with an almost silent T) So i guess its just like saying Wall uh as 2 seperate words.
My accent is so confusing XD

JoJo:
I personally have a typical Southern English RP accent, the amount of formality increasing if I'm talking with strangers and taking on a slight tone of West Country if I'm with friends or family. A lot of people seem to think my accent is "posh" but to me it just sounds normal. Then again people often don't seem to be able to hear their own accent, I've had both a Welsh and American friend be surprised when I tell them they have an accent :-P

Yah, me too... (the RP bit and formalities, that is...)

Other than that, I usually change my accent depending on who I'm talking to. Where I live is quite close to the East End of London, so I put on a slight chavvish accent when talking to some of the guys at work. Then, there's the 'lah' when with Hong Kong and Singaporean people (along with the common affectations, whether in Chinese or English). And I'm at my most RP with foreigners who speak fluent English... o_O' And, with people I'm good friends with (this includes my family) I end up sounding like an English Michael Wincott... *shrug*

To be fair, I have a habit of copying other accents and famous voices. I can play it seriously and I can ham it up. I can do as much John Cleese and Peter Falk as Bruce Willis and Samuel L Jackson.

However, when I am NOT being everybody else, I default to a Pittsburgh accent because that is where I live.

Well I live in Stockholm, Sweden. So I guess my accent would be Stockholmska? which most people in Sweden consider bratty (at least that is what I've been told)

My English accent is a mess. It's a bizzare, warped monstrosity of a Lancashire-accent (I've been told) and BBC english. It's like I'm schizophrenic or something. "Aahlreit!" is a gem of mine.

My Swedish accent have the same pattern, a weird, generic TV-presenter kind of accent with a bit of west coast thrown in. At least it's consistent. And I did manage to breed out most of the horrific default accent most Swedes got when speaking English. "Haellau! Hao aaar yoo dooyng?" Even if it does make me sound like a BBC-drone haunted by the ghost of Demoman.

Tubez:
Well I live in Stockholm, Sweden. So I guess my accent would be Stockholmska? which most people in Sweden consider bratty (at least that is what I've been told)

Don't worry, I think it sounds adorable. :3

"Jjieeeekoooij?"

Soviet Heavy:
What I officially have is called Ottawa Valley Twang.

Hooray, another Ottawan!

OP: Ottawa Valley accent, but with an overlay of Indian and German (my parents are immigrants).

Well I'm from Huddersfield in England so I have a typical Yorkshire accent. It's not that broad but you get what I mean. You'd know straight away I was from Yorkshire.

Thunderous Cacophony:

Soviet Heavy:
What I officially have is called Ottawa Valley Twang.

Hooray, another Ottawan!

OP: Ottawa Valley accent, but with an overlay of Indian and German (my parents are immigrants).

Where are you from exactly? Renfrew area or further up?

Soviet Heavy:

Thunderous Cacophony:

Soviet Heavy:
What I officially have is called Ottawa Valley Twang.

Hooray, another Ottawan!

OP: Ottawa Valley accent, but with an overlay of Indian and German (my parents are immigrants).

Where are you from exactly? Renfrew area or further up?

Manotick, actually, but I went to school in the country with a lot of people from the Renfrew/Arnprior region, and it's kinda stuck with me.

Thunderous Cacophony:

Soviet Heavy:

Thunderous Cacophony:

Hooray, another Ottawan!

OP: Ottawa Valley accent, but with an overlay of Indian and German (my parents are immigrants).

Where are you from exactly? Renfrew area or further up?

Manotick, actually, but I went to school in the country with a lot of people from the Renfrew/Arnprior region, and it's kinda stuck with me.

Interesting. I went to school at Renfrew Collegiate Institute, but I never knew anyone from Manotick.

Muspelheim:

Tubez:
Well I live in Stockholm, Sweden. So I guess my accent would be Stockholmska? which most people in Sweden consider bratty (at least that is what I've been told)

Don't worry, I think it sounds adorable. :3

"Jjieeeekoooij?"

That is the first time that I have anyone call it adorable :P

And I'm sorry but what is Jjieeeekoooij?
I have always sucked at reading phonics

Californian Accent with a little Korean due to immigrant parents, but you really wouldn't notice.

North England. The technical definition of northern and southern lies in the pronunciation of the word "bastard".

I have a slightly New York accent, usually with a loud volume level.

I'm a Vancouverite and I've apparently got a Canadian accent, according to my American friends - I don't really detect anything especially accent-ish about my voice but I guess there are minor pronunciation differences, even between Vancouver and Seattle.

Like the word "decal". Always seemed normal to me to pronounce it "deckle" but apparently the usual American pronunciation is "Dee cal".

XMark:

Like the word "decal". Always seemed normal to me to pronounce it "deckle" but apparently the usual American pronunciation is "Dee cal".

I've lived in 4 major Canadian cities from coast to coast, including Vancouver, and I have never heard a single person pronounce it "deckle".

I'm told I have an accent. I can't honestly say. Do you guys know of guys from Saskatchewan with a regional accent?

*shrugs*

If we do, it isn't that memorable because I think it has only come up once if ever.

Live on the west coast of the US, which means I have almost no accent what so ever. Although, I like to do accents, so I have a tendency to slip in and out of various accents (for example, when I'm tired, I some times talk in a southern drawl).

All I can say it's a bizarre thing that probably no one else in the entire world has, my own personal accent if you will, couldn't help developing a strange accent since as a kid I was always moving between cities all over México, so I have an amalgamation of around 13 different accents which is only made stranger by the fact that for some reason my Spanish language is really proper, normally using words that most people aren't familiar with, and then you throw English in the mix which I learned from TV and school but in school I was taught UK English because that is the proper one, you know? So basically it's just weird and also ridiculously monotone, though I have been told by some women that it's sexy so at least it has that going for it.

GrimTuesday:
Live on the west coast of the US, which means I have almost no accent what so ever. Although, I like to do accents, so I have a tendency to slip in and out of various accents (for example, when I'm tired, I some times talk in a southern drawl).

It's impossible not to have an accent and technically speaking if any place were to have English without accent it would be some part of England, given that the language originated there but given the time that has passed English without an Accent is probably non-existent, just saying, also to you it will always be the other people that ones that sound like they have accent because yours is always going to sound like the default accent, so I take it you mean you have West Coast US accent.

I'm from all over the US but have spent most of my life in Atlanta. I have a generic American accent (those you'd typically see in a movie) with an ever so slight southern accent. It rarely shows itself however, and for good reason.

English. I mean, I lived in North Wales most of my life but I wouldn't call my accent Welsh, so English will have to do (that's what everyone in Canada says it is anyway. Or Australian, for some weird reason).

I'm from Toronto, so I suppose my baseline accent is sort of Canadian/American - I don't really notice any regional oddities with it, outside remnants of Scots, although I suppose we all need a baseline.

That said, I grew up with a mid-strength Edinburgh accent, courtesy of my mother, until it naturalized, so I've always been fascinated by accents. I can still whip out my old accent, as I can different varieties of many other accents. If I'm exposed to a voice that sounds distinctive, I will either try to mimic it, or I'll just start doing it accidentally.

I'm from Austin so I have the most typical American accent ever, but with a little bit of Texan in there. I don't use any of the slang, though, don't like most of it.

I slip between my regular white Canadian guy voice, and an Irish accent. Thanks to my father. His parents were both from Ireland, but he's not full time accent either.

To be honest I wouldn't know what my accent is. I'm Dutch and I've tried to learn to not have either a Dutch or an American accent like most around here have, but I'm not quite sure what the result is. I do know I get some words wrong in pronouncing them wrong, ussually names of places or very specific words I've only learned in writing. For instance this year I learned that Moscow being pronounced as "moss cow" is American, and the English turn it into more of a 'moss queu'
An Englishman who didn't know me once asked me if I was from Liverpool and nobody in the US or Canada with whom it came up ever guessed where I was from.

I suppose it'll be a mix of various English accents that nobody will be able to determine.

Nottingham lad here.

So as a someone who lives in the East Midlands, our accents are neither Northern, nor Southern.

Depending on the person, it can sway further towards either direction.

Myself? I don't really have an accent, but I have my formal voice, in which I enuciate my words properly, and then there's my everyday voice, which still isn't as slang filled as most locals', but I sometimes leave the 'H' off a lot of words.

I 'urt myself
I 'ate it
'ippopotamus

And even then, I tend to pronounce them properly more often than not.

I'm from Canada and parts of my speech have a bit of Wisconsin in them, or so I've been told. I mean uh... what're you talking aboot hoser?

Black Country:
Kaylied - Intoxicated
Yampy - Crazy
Oss - Horse
Giz a goo - Let me have a go
Ar - Yes
Tar - Thank You
Ai - Isn't
Dai - Didn't
Doe/Dow - Doesn't
Yow am - You are
Jed - Dead
Jeded - Died
Tay - Tea
Bostin - Good
Fittle - Food
Bonk - Bank (Eg. Quarry Bonk)

Though accents around the Black Country vary from settlement to settlement they each share a common vocabulary sometimes.

Mine ai as thick as some people from arahnd here but I wish it was a bit mowa.

I have a generally Australian accent, and I can't hear myself properly so I don't know how different it is from people from other areas. I do know that I roll my r's more than most other Aussies, prompting many Aussies to ask if I have ever spent time in (or originated from) countries like Ireland, the USA and the UK. I never get that question from those guys though (paddys, yanks and poms that is).

As for regional accents, I can't really tell you much. I personally find the differences to subtle to describe. I can usually guess if someone's from Victoria or WA or Queensland but only if I'm trying (from Sydney by the way). I think the best way to describe the Australian accent is lazy pronunciation and enunciation. Such as "Fucken" or "Bludg'n" instead of "Fucking" and "Bludging".

I have a Northumbrian accent. It's essentially a rural Geordie accent, the two aren't particularly different though. We're able to tell the difference but it's rare that you'll find anyone else who can.

There are far too many colloquialisms to list them all here.

I live in Ohio, but was born in Tennessee, and my mother is from Texas.

For the most part, nobody really mentions noticing an accent, but I've got those moments where the south comes out in me.

Im fairly well spoken as my mums quite proper with that stuff but my dads cockney side bursts out when I get emotional.

ERE, AVE A WORD!

That one seems to pop up quite abit.

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