Cop goes to wrong house, shoots owners dog.

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 NEXT
 

It's America, shooting things is their thing, the only strange part to this story is that the owner didn't get shot as well, I'm betting most Americans would like it if he did.

evilneko:

mrhappy1489:

This might come across as stereotyping, but are you Irish. I'm sure you understand why I'm asking this question, to be sure.

Not really, no. I may have some Scottish or Irish (even Wiki is unsure) ancestry but I am native-born Texan.

Oh, and no I don't understand why you ask. Why do you ask?

To be sure is a very typical phrase associated with Irishmen, I know this for whatever reason, which is the only reason why I asked. I've actually had a lot of luck guessing the ethnicity of people on the escapist based on very acute details, which is why I asked whether or not you were Irish.

Ix Rebound:

Shawn MacDonald:
Oh my god a human being made a mistake, you are kidding me. Yeah I thought the rest of us are perfect. That is the final straw, time to make a "lets kill all cops thread." May your torches burn bright and your pitchforks pointy, it's cop killing time. Everyone on this planet signed a pact to be perfect, I won't stand a glitch in the system. Almost can't type right now because my perfect world is falling apart. Lets put the joking aside and say he made a mistake, will probably feel bad for a long time.

you would be probably singing a different tune if it had been YOUR dog

Okay not really because I hate dogs. Yeah I see your point on that one. that applies to everyone and is not really a good point to hide behind. Might as well say that I need to eat to live, or that I have to sleep from time to time. Everyone makes huge mistakes in their life. At some point, you will to. Literally have no idea what it takes to be a police officer and I can assume that the job is probably stressful

In other high stress professions, a mistake like that would lead to serious disciplinairy actions. But since this is the AMERICAN POLICE FORCE!!, it was clearly a misunderstanding, no harm done, let's get some coffee.

You know how Dutch, and Belgian, and German, and probably a whole lot of other police forces would have handled it?
Domestic disturbance! Knock on door. Guy opens. Ask if everything is all right while another cop stands by in case of violence.

But no, the American way works too I guess.

The weirdest part with these threads I always find to be the reactions of... certain people who defend the actions of these cops without question. Had this occurred in my country, there would have been a huge shitstorm, questions would have been asked, people would have gone to the bottom of why he went to the wrong house, why he felled the need for excessive violence, and then disciplinary actions will be undertaken.

dyre:

captcha: klatu berada nikto
How awesome is that?

Very awesome.

Stil not has bad as the guys that shot the retired military veteran after getting the wrong address in a drug bust and shot him despite the man providing no real threat while his son and wife were hiding in a closet because he thought it might have been said drug dealers/lowly criminal.

...

sorry im not as bothered by animal deaths. theres too many homeless ones that die every day, let alone the ones that have homes and are abused in them, the law states that you cant use deadly force to protect your dog, only yourself, and they always get blown out of proportion. Its a dog/cat/bird/guinea pig/fish/etc.

EDIT:

though I will say, I dont know what this obsession with American (but lets be honest they mean US) officers are all blood hungry beasts bent on murdering whatever the fuck they see. I guess I fail to realize that other countries' police forces are infallible 9whcih they arent), though I suspect its cause other countries dont care as much when shit like this happens.

chadachada123:

The_Critic:
People are real quick these days to jump on police officers when these types of stories are so few and far between. There are thousands of Police officers in the united states, many that put there lives in danger so we don't have to deal with drug dealers, rapists, murderers, thieves, child molesters and anarachy.

I think it's something as a nation we have taken for granted. And then when a nutjob does something stupid, we as a society jump on the group as a whole.

It's highly disappointing to see the state we've come to as a people.

The problem isn't that some cops abuse their authority once in awhile.

The problem is that THE VAST MAJORITY OF THEM FACE NO PUNISHMENT WHATSOEVER, or such a disproportionate punishment compared to what a citizen would get, when they should get as harsh or more-harsh of a punishment since they were trusted with authority to begin with.

There is no way for you to know the extent of their punishment. News always will have it's own bias, they will either make it look like the officer got scott free or they will make it look like the officer was justified and should be awarded for what he did. If the "news" is all you have to base your opinions off of, IMO you can't argue this.

Just know that Internal affairs will deal with it as is seen fit. If he did something criminal he will be brought before a judge of his peers, and if he is found guilty he will be punished according to whatever the judge deems a fair punishment.

spartan231490:

Bertylicious:
I'd just say "lol, what a Muppet" but then I'd get done for a low content post.

I guess I'll add that he should face disciplinary action. Perhaps a written warning (or yank equivalent) and apologise to the owner?

I'm sure he'll feel much better about being held at gunpoint in his own home and having his dog shot after he gets an apology.

The cop should lose his god damn job, and be responsible for replacing the dog(as much as can be).

Really? I mean to say; training police officers is expensive and this was a man who made an honest mistake that any of us could have made.

He goes to a house where there is a domestic dispute, a violent and potentially lethal situation, and he gets rushed by a dog. How are we to know the dog only wanted to say "Hello? Hello, I love you!"?

All the poor dude sees is dog charging at him. Saliva flecking off its jaws, eyes burning like the fires of hades and then it leaps at him. All the while a woman is screaming, children are screaming.

I think in that situation you or I would have done the same thing.

The family will get compensation anyway. They will be able to buy 10 dogs with that money.

Bertylicious:

spartan231490:

Bertylicious:
I'd just say "lol, what a Muppet" but then I'd get done for a low content post.

I guess I'll add that he should face disciplinary action. Perhaps a written warning (or yank equivalent) and apologise to the owner?

I'm sure he'll feel much better about being held at gunpoint in his own home and having his dog shot after he gets an apology.

The cop should lose his god damn job, and be responsible for replacing the dog(as much as can be).

Really? I mean to say; training police officers is expensive and this was a man who made an honest mistake that any of us could have made.

He goes to a house where there is a domestic dispute, a violent and potentially lethal situation, and he gets rushed by a dog. How are we to know the dog only wanted to say "Hello? Hello, I love you!"?

All the poor dude sees is dog charging at him. Saliva flecking off its jaws, eyes burning like the fires of hades and then it leaps at him. All the while a woman is screaming, children are screaming.

I think in that situation you or I would have done the same thing.

The family will get compensation anyway. They will be able to buy 10 dogs with that money.

Because that would solve everything for that family! Hurray!

A surgeon is even more valuable then a police officer, if they make a mistake like that, you can bet they won't be able to work for a very long time.
The US has a strange blind spot to police officers.. it disturbs me greatly.

Bassik:
In other high stress professions, a mistake like that would lead to serious disciplinairy actions. But since this is the AMERICAN POLICE FORCE!!, it was clearly a misunderstanding, no harm done, let's get some coffee.

This.

The problems in this case are so blatant, but I doubt any of them will be dealt with.

Why was he sent to the wrong address, why did he go in with gun drawn on a domestic disturbance, why did he go in aggressively rather than diplomatically, why didn't he make an attempt to actually confirm the identify of the person he was dealing with.. hell, with his gun pointed at the guy, why didn't he give him a chance to restrain the animal.

The overly aggressive attitude towards conflict resolution in the US seems disturbing to me, and it leads directly to this kind of situation.

A police officer making a mistake that kills anyone, even if it is a pet, is not acceptable. Next time it might not be a dog.

spartan231490:
...

The cop should lose his god damn job, and be responsible for replacing the dog(as much as can be).

actually the radio dispather should be, since they ballsed up the operation with the wrong address. maybe if they were competent none of this would have happened.

Bassik:
...

A surgeon is even more valuable then a police officer, if they make a mistake like that, you can bet they won't be able to work for a very long time. ...

You could debate the worth of a police officer vs a surgeon (because at the moment Id rather feel safe in the knowledge theres an officer who will directly deal with the criminal so that id ont have to and put myself in the danger) based on the needs a person wants fulfilled, though Id have to question what a Surgeon is doing doing a police officers duties.

Besides, it would depend on the mistake and the insurance the surgeon has. Surgeons arent infallible, and not everyone that screws up is never employed again. You'd have to majorly balls up something to do that, like amputate a foot to your wrist in place of your hand despite having the hand with you. hell, the shit alone that gets left in people after surgeries would make the unemployment rate skyrocket even worse.

this is why i like the british police, only bring guns in if it is a big confirmed threat (i know there is probably more detail to it) so that "accidental" shootings aren't as common

Haha! Oh, America.. You are so silly. I think it's a bit strange that this kind of thing only seems to happen in USA. This and school-shootings.

Shawn MacDonald:

Angry Juju:

Shawn MacDonald:
Oh my god a human being made a mistake, you are kidding me. Yeah I thought the rest of us are perfect. That is the final straw, time to make a "lets kill all cops thread." May your torches burn bright and your pitchforks pointy, it's cop killing time. Everyone on this planet signed a pact to be perfect, I won't stand a glitch in the system. Almost can't type right now because my perfect world is falling apart. Lets put the joking aside and say he made a mistake, will probably feel bad for a long time.

Yeah he's fine, the other day when I was mowing the lawn, I finished mowing only to find that not only was I in the wrong lawn, but I had mowed over my neighbour's prize roses. It was only a mistake though, we're all human and we all make mistakes. I mean how was I supposed to know that I was in the wrong lawn? and how was I supposed to NOT shred those prize roses to pieces as my neighbour was shouting some garble about the roses being dethorned and carefully looked after?

but seriously you sound so stupid just saying it was a mistake.. Let's look at the facts shall we?

1. Cop gets information about where he needs to go
2. Cop goes into wrong house DESPITE HAVING THE INFORMATION (seriously it's not like he was picking a house at random) and barges in
2a. The cop has his gun already drawn as he goes in
3. dog barks at the cop, the owner tells the cop the dog won't hurt him but can't get the dog back because the cop is pointing his gun at the dog
4. the cop shoots the dog who WASN'T attacking him (the guy had time to explain that the dog wasn't going to hurt the cop...)

Whatever you say, your opinion is law. I don't argue anymore on here. I am stupid and your smart, may others think the way you do.

That was so obnoxious. I can smell it all the way over here. Seriously, he merely countered your point and you decide to turn to insults? Thats so immature.

Kaptajn Emil Alfred Conan Swagga Benzon:
Haha! Oh, America.. You are so silly. I think it's a bit strange that this kind of thing only seems to happen in USA. This and school-shootings.

didnt Norway have a summer camp shooting not all that long ago?

Why the hell did he have his gun out in the first place? Was he going to shoot the guy for beating up his girlfriend? And has this guy never been around dogs before or something because every dog ever will bark and run towards a stranger entering their house. It's pretty easy to tell which are vicious and which aren't (hint the vicious ones are growling not barking to begin with). Yes, all humans make mistakes but when you're a cop and have people's and animals lives in your hands you can't afford to be making mistakes like this (I don't mean messing up the address). Yes the guy he was going to arrest was probably very aggressive but that doesn't mean you have to pull your gun out to deal with him.

Captcha: Speeding Bullet. Not cool captcha, not cool.

Got to say I feel sorry for the dog but even if this sounds a bit harsh I am happy he shot the dog and not the man.
Best option would've of course been gong into the right house to start with.

Nikolaz72:

Shawn MacDonald:

Angry Juju:

Yeah he's fine, the other day when I was mowing the lawn, I finished mowing only to find that not only was I in the wrong lawn, but I had mowed over my neighbour's prize roses. It was only a mistake though, we're all human and we all make mistakes. I mean how was I supposed to know that I was in the wrong lawn? and how was I supposed to NOT shred those prize roses to pieces as my neighbour was shouting some garble about the roses being dethorned and carefully looked after?

but seriously you sound so stupid just saying it was a mistake.. Let's look at the facts shall we?

1. Cop gets information about where he needs to go
2. Cop goes into wrong house DESPITE HAVING THE INFORMATION (seriously it's not like he was picking a house at random) and barges in
2a. The cop has his gun already drawn as he goes in
3. dog barks at the cop, the owner tells the cop the dog won't hurt him but can't get the dog back because the cop is pointing his gun at the dog
4. the cop shoots the dog who WASN'T attacking him (the guy had time to explain that the dog wasn't going to hurt the cop...)

Whatever you say, your opinion is law. I don't argue anymore on here. I am stupid and your smart, may others think the way you do.

That was so obnoxious. I can smell it all the way over here. Seriously, he merely countered your point and you decide to turn to insults? Thats so immature.

Okay I don't listen to anybody who says this line. "Seriously you sound so stupid just saying it was a mistake." You know after he said this, I don't think he is in a position to be taken seriously.

emeraldrafael:

You could debate the worth of a police officer vs a surgeon (because at the moment Id rather feel safe in the knowledge theres an officer who will directly deal with the criminal so that id ont have to and put myself in the danger) based on the needs a person wants fulfilled, though Id have to question what a Surgeon is doing doing a police officers duties.

1. That is exactly the sort of thinking that leads to things like this. Scared white people needing a security blanket in the form of trigger-happy policemen.
2.You know damn well I was not saying that the surgeon would have been in the exact same situation. Don't pretend you are stupid.

didnt Norway have a summer camp shooting not all that long ago?

Terrorism =/ school shootings.

The_Critic:

chadachada123:

The_Critic:
People are real quick these days to jump on police officers when these types of stories are so few and far between. There are thousands of Police officers in the united states, many that put there lives in danger so we don't have to deal with drug dealers, rapists, murderers, thieves, child molesters and anarachy.

I think it's something as a nation we have taken for granted. And then when a nutjob does something stupid, we as a society jump on the group as a whole.

It's highly disappointing to see the state we've come to as a people.

The problem isn't that some cops abuse their authority once in awhile.

The problem is that THE VAST MAJORITY OF THEM FACE NO PUNISHMENT WHATSOEVER, or such a disproportionate punishment compared to what a citizen would get, when they should get as harsh or more-harsh of a punishment since they were trusted with authority to begin with.

There is no way for you to know the extent of their punishment. News always will have it's own bias, they will either make it look like the officer got scott free or they will make it look like the officer was justified and should be awarded for what he did. If the "news" is all you have to base your opinions off of, IMO you can't argue this.

Just know that Internal affairs will deal with it as is seen fit. If he did something criminal he will be brought before a judge of his peers, and if he is found guilty he will be punished according to whatever the judge deems a fair punishment.

Long, long post, skip to the middle for the explanation of how the US works, or to the end for the main point.

I...I don't think that you seriously believe this. Either that, or, given your use of "internal affairs" (British/English term), you aren't an American citizen and don't understand just how corrupt our police forces are here. While the FBI (federal) does investigate SOME cases of police corruption, it is quite rare, and state/county/local police forces have and do abuse their authority for various reasons. And they can do so with little threat, both because most fellow officers will cover for them and because many judges will give lesser sentences (if any) for officers that break the law.

I'm not using the news to say whether or not an officer is justified in their actions (and semi-frequently side AGAINST news pieces that try to make the cops actions appear justified when they aren't). I'm saying that the news shows fairly often that cops are not punished for their actions, let alone punished fairly.

Here's an example where an officer shot an innocent person 6 times and then attempted to cover it up, changing his story to make him appear to be not at fault, and then being cleared of all wrongdoing by his district:

http://abcnews.go.com/US/phoenix-family-lawsuit-cops-shot-homeowner-intruder/story?id=8756441#.T4-3M9WQnKd

http://blogs.phoenixnewtimes.com/valleyfever/2009/03/hero_homeowner_shot_mistakenly.php

Best part? The actual criminal in that case was only given a warning, because he was "unarmed" (the gun was found on a subsequent search by the homeowner). This all isn't a "look at the way the news spins it! I agree with the news!" It's a "here are some hard facts about what happened, and this is the punishment they received or didn't receive. This is unfair."

Explanation of the US Justice System

You must understand how the US justice system works. For criminal cases, officers investigate their district (which is generally small, a county or town, and, rarely, a state) for crime-breaking. They can arrest on-site or can wait for a warrant from a prosecutor. The prosecutor is who determines if a crime will be charged in a court of law. After this (and after the Grand Jury that determines if there's enough evidence for a trial), a judge reviews the case, and, in some cases, is allowed to dismiss the case if the judge finds the claims unsubstantiated. The case may then go to trial, with the accused being allowed either a judge or a jury trial. After this, a verdict is made, and if guilty, the judge will have a hearing to determine the punishment.

Each of these stages has a people with little oversight that can clear an officer of wrongdoing, these people each having personal/political reasons to side with the officer. Police officers can and will cover up and attempt to shield fellow officers, prosecutors will choose to not investigate or charge officers unless they are extremely high-profile, and judges will use various methods to lessen the appearance of guilt or otherwise side with officers, especially in small civil cases.

In large civil cases of police brutality seen before a jury, the state or county overwhelmingly loses. In criminal *jury* cases, officers also overwhelmingly are found guilty in many cases. Even so, judges (who determine the actual punishment, not juries) will almost always give officers exceedingly light punishments compared to normal citizens.

In addition, if a prosecutor chooses not to charge someone with a crime, there is very little (read: nothing) that can be done short of bringing federal charges into the case, which is only done in very high-profile cases, as the feds don't exercise much authority (having most of their authority in drug trafficking, corruption, and terrorism, not assault or "minor"/relatively insignificant corruption) over state or county proceedings.

Besides, in civil cases where the state or city is ordered to pay millions in damages, that money comes directly from taxpayer wallets, and in many cases the state or city's police department will deny any wrongdoing after the fact and will let the officer keep his/her job with a slap on the wrist at best.

TL;DR version:

Just read this tiny collection of just some of the cases in the US, and take note of how often the officers in question face penalties, how harsh the penalties are, and how rarely the penalties are criminal penalties as opposed to just being fired (hint, "not often," "not very," and "far too much," respectively):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cases_of_police_brutality_in_the_United_States

Edit: here's an additional link which has cases where officers killed somebody, whether justified or not. Some of these are clear brutality:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_killings_by_law_enforcement_officers_in_the_United_States

If you want to chalk these all up to "media spin" and not recognize that a great deal of them are because of our justice system failing...Power to you, brosif...

Still don't think there should be so much hate directed toward police officers as there is.

Police officer that break the law are no longer worthy of being called police officers they are criminals.

Yes I am a US citizen, just not as well read on the subject as you are apparently. Also yes I do agree with you if an officer breaks the law he should be tried as a criminal and given a criminals punishment, and if that is not happening it's reprehensible.

However,I go back to my main point, Cops are given a bad rap, they are torn to pieces by the news, internet, and media. They are put under the microscope and God forbid they actually have to pull out their guns in any situation, because they get eaten up by the news media. I'm sick of the hate toward them.

Cops can't do anything without everyone shouting "CORRUPTION" at the top of their lungs.

I'm certainly not going to say they're infallible, but the reason they quote-unquote "get away" with the things they do is often because they're completely justified.

If popular opinion had it's way, police wouldn't be given anything more lethal than pepper spray, and consequently there'd be more stories of "Community mourns the loss of 3 police officers" instead of "evil police shoot and kill a man just for swinging a crowbar at their heads"

Why doesn't it surprise me that this happened in Texas? (Actually scrap that, USA)

People, that shoot other living beings without justification should follow the consequences of that.

Buretsu:
Cops can't do anything without everyone shouting "CORRUPTION" at the top of their lungs.

Well people don't like corruption, and the US police seems to me infinitly more corrupt then their Dutch counterparts. For one thing, if something like that happened over here, internal affairs would be all over it, and if they feel the officer was in the wrong, he will have to face disciplinairy or even criminal charges.

Police brutality is something you expect in a third world country, not in the "leader of the free world".
And yet...

...if a man enters my home and shoots my dog, regardless of what uniform he has on, I'll shoot him in return. I personally think that if the police officer had been killed on the spot after shooting, it would have been completely justified. (and that's not just my love of animals over humans talking either)

As of now, the moment has passed, and force is no longer necessary in return. However, the officer should be charged with... something. Whatever you would charge a random citizen with if he had broken into a house and shot someone's dog. I don't mean "let's send the police officer home for a month and make him think about what he's done". I mean kick him off the force and throw his ass in a jail cell for 5 years

Because that would solve everything for that family! Hurray!

A surgeon is even more valuable then a police officer, if they make a mistake like that, you can bet they won't be able to work for a very long time.
The US has a strange blind spot to police officers.. it disturbs me greatly.

I dunno about that mate; it's very rare for an incident of malpractice to result in a doctor being barred from practicing. Surgeons make mistakes all the time and people die, but the medical profession understands that if you crucify every surgeon or doctor for every instance of malpractice that pretty soon you won't have any doctors.

Jocular flipancy aside, I do recognise that this is an awful thing that has happened. Pets are part of the family and to have one killed in such an abrubt and horrific way is particularly traumatic. That doesn't, however, justify an emotional, knee-jerk, reaction.

The innocent man surely deserves an apology at the least, but this is hardly a massive case of Police stupidity or corruption: it is just a fuck up. Shooting the dog was a pretty shit turn of events, especially since the poor bastard was sent to the wrong house.

My only question is; why was he alone? I was under the impression that Police usually travelled in pairs for their own protection and flexibility with situations, why did they send this guy out on his lonesome?

However, to anyone posting pics of dogs asking 'how can that hurt you?'....you're a fucking fool. Any moderately sized dog (Golden Retriever/Labrador upwards) and even some small ones are capable of intense violence if their brain decides it is needed. Dogs have accompanied men to war, which should really say all that need be said.

Angry Juju:

1. Cop gets information about where he needs to go
2. Cop goes into wrong house DESPITE HAVING THE INFORMATION (seriously it's not like he was picking a house at random) and barges in
2a. The cop has his gun already drawn as he goes in
3. dog barks at the cop, the owner tells the cop the dog won't hurt him but can't get the dog back because the cop is pointing his gun at the dog
4. the cop shoots the dog who WASN'T attacking him (the guy had time to explain that the dog wasn't going to hurt the cop...)

Cop fucked up bad by going into the wrong property, and that mistake should cost him for sure.

However, having his gun drawn when called to a "disturbance", which I will assume to be a "domestic disturbance", could easily be normal practice in Austin, Texas. Keep in mind that, as far as I understand it, Texas has some of the most lax firearm laws in the US.
And of course we don't know how the call was described to him, whether someone said they saw a gun, or heard a firearm discharge.

Hell, I could call the cops right now and tell them that I saw my neighbor with an assault rifle, and they'd be coming in with the guns drawn, and I live in über-peaceful Denmark, in a quiet neighborhood.

Until the investigators arrive and make their judgement, what the caller said happened is effectively what happened as far as the police are concerned.

As for the dog getting shot despite the owner trying to reassure the cop that it wouldn't attack, well, if the cop thought he was in the right place, then why the heck would he take the owners word for it?
And there's no video of the dog, only sound.

Bottom line, the cop fucked up bad by going to the wrong place, but otherwise he acted just like any cop would, and should.

He should be facing some sort of disciplinary action, and he should be checked for literacy and be given map-reading instructions or something, but otherwise he did his job.

Cops can't do anything without everyone shouting "CORRUPTION" at the top of their lungs.

I'm certainly not going to say they're infallible, but the reason they quote-unquote "get away" with the things they do is often because they're completely justified.

This has been proven wrong two postings above yours.Police corruption is shouted so often because, quite simply, it's happening so often. The facts are pretty damning.

but this is hardly a massive case of Police stupidity

Barging into a house, gun drawn, in situations like this is always police stupidity. This is why he should be fired: The next time, he might open fire on a human. A gung-ho cop like this should not be allowed to remain in his position (which he is likely to abuse).

I think it is hilarious that the same people that would demand a shopping clerk that disrespected them to be fired are standing so stauntly behind a cop that made two gross mistakes, each of which should get him fired.

Kaptajn Emil Alfred Conan Swagga Benzon:
Haha! Oh, America.. You are so silly. I think it's a bit strange that this kind of thing only seems to happen in USA. This and school-shootings.

Well then you should open your eyes because you seem to ignore any kind of news from other countries.

CCountZero:

Angry Juju:

1. Cop gets information about where he needs to go
2. Cop goes into wrong house DESPITE HAVING THE INFORMATION (seriously it's not like he was picking a house at random) and barges in
2a. The cop has his gun already drawn as he goes in
3. dog barks at the cop, the owner tells the cop the dog won't hurt him but can't get the dog back because the cop is pointing his gun at the dog
4. the cop shoots the dog who WASN'T attacking him (the guy had time to explain that the dog wasn't going to hurt the cop...)

Cop fucked up bad by going into the wrong property, and that mistake should cost him for sure.

However, having his gun drawn when called to a "disturbance", which I will assume to be a "domestic disturbance", could easily be normal practice in Austin, Texas. Keep in mind that, as far as I understand it, Texas has some of the most lax firearm laws in the US.
And of course we don't know how the call was described to him, whether someone said they saw a gun, or heard a firearm discharge.

Hell, I could call the cops right now and tell them that I saw my neighbor with an assault rifle, and they'd be coming in with the guns drawn, and I live in über-peaceful Denmark, in a quiet neighborhood.

Until the investigators arrive and make their judgement, what the caller said happened is effectively what happened as far as the police are concerned.

As for the dog getting shot despite the owner trying to reassure the cop that it wouldn't attack, well, if the cop thought he was in the right place, then why the heck would he take the owners word for it?
And there's no video of the dog, only sound.

Bottom line, the cop fucked up bad by going to the wrong place, but otherwise he acted just like any cop would, and should.

He should be facing some sort of disciplinary action, and he should be checked for literacy and be given map-reading instructions or something, but otherwise he did his job.

Police procedure back where I lived in California for a domestic dispute was always diplomacy first and to never go in without a partner. I'm hopin that the procedures in Austin are the same, but I could be wrong.

Unless the officer is respondin to a call about shots fired or one of the parties havin a weapon, weapon drawn before you even get into the house is a horrible breach of procedure. Even if he had got the right house, what exactly was he plannin to do with that gun? He was alone, respondin to a domestic disturbance call without anyone (as far I've read anyway) sayin there were weapons involved, and he came in without cause or warnin with his weapon ready. Was he really expectin to defuse a situation by pointin a gun at someone?

Wait...Texas. Maybe that was his plan all along.

CCountZero:
SNIP

The thing is: The cop did not go to the wrong adress by his mistake, he got the wrong adress from whoever reported it.

Also, from what you hear on the news report (and the tape) the owner started yelling AFTER the dog did something to make the officer shoot / the officer shot the dog. I get the strong vibe that lots of people are just nagging on the officer because of the sake of it.

TheKasp:

CCountZero:
SNIP

The thing is: The cop did not go to the wrong adress by his mistake, he got the wrong adress from whoever reported it.

Also, from what you hear on the news report (and the tape) the owner started yelling AFTER the dog did something to make the officer shoot / the officer shot the dog. I get the strong vibe that lots of people are just nagging on the officer because of the sake of it.

Seems to me the hat who called it in is to blame, then.

On the dog issue, I heard the owner try to tell the officer that the dog wouldn't attack, but the officer discharged his firearm right after. Less than five seconds after, right after.

But yeah, if the Officer went to the address that he was given, then he is in the clear far as I'm concerned.

shintakie10:

CCountZero:

Snip

Police procedure back where I lived in California for a domestic dispute was always diplomacy first and to never go in without a partner. I'm hopin that the procedures in Austin are the same, but I could be wrong.

Unless the officer is respondin to a call about shots fired or one of the parties havin a weapon, weapon drawn before you even get into the house is a horrible breach of procedure. Even if he had got the right house, what exactly was he plannin to do with that gun? He was alone, respondin to a domestic disturbance call without anyone (as far I've read anyway) sayin there were weapons involved, and he came in without cause or warnin with his weapon ready. Was he really expectin to defuse a situation by pointin a gun at someone?

Wait...Texas. Maybe that was his plan all along.

Well, as I said, none of us know what the call-in said about the situation, and for the sake of argument, again it being Texas, the caller could easily have described a situation involving a firearm.

Now, in Denmark, if there's a suspicion that a firearm is in the mix, the police go in with their guns holstered, by unhooked and they'll have their right hand on the weapon ready to draw.

Now, if I take into consideration that this is the US, and then that it's Texas, I can only surmise that the chance of the suspicion being correct just went up twenty-fold, if not more.

So then the police readiness goes up twenty-fold as well, which means he could easily be in the Weaver-stance and ready to fire soon as he approaches, and far as I could tell, he wasn't going that far.

The gun isn't there to defuse the situation, it's there for his protection. He's not gonna help the situation by pointing a gun at them, hell, that's probably only gonna make things worse.
But you try telling an officer to go into a place where a couple of potentially armed, agitated and angry people are arguing or whatnot, without backing him up with a firearm of his own, and the training to use it with deadly intent?

That just won't fly.

There's a reason police often use hollow-point or frangible ammunition for their sidearms. When they shoot, it's usually at closer than 5 meters distance.

Even if he shoots first, he could easily be shot back at, and at 5 meters he's gonna be hit.
For that reason, police shoot to kill.

This is why the police shouldn't and don't need to have guns, I know people will say that its fine if everyone has guns, but wouldn't it be better if no-one has them? The statistics are against you america, you have the most gun crime and most high school shootings per capita etc. Just outright ban the things.

I'm glad I live in the UK.

This is why I think that learning about the way dogs act should be part of police training.

Mistakes happen but still, a little bit of knowledge could have changed the outcome without a dog being shot.

Anyone know if the officer apologised to the guy who's dog he shot?

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 NEXT

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked