Lovecraft is not really scary.

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So escapist, after spending time on the internet especially here where there are many references to cthulu and such I decided to give lovecraft literature a shot and well...it is boring as fuck. Not only that its not even really scary due to the fact that it constantly depends on two factors.
Pointlessness
and
Madness

The mystery starts, they discover great monsters of long ago or monsters are among us and dont even try to fight back cause they are hopelessly more advanced than us even though they are just fucking blobs of mesh that dont really ever do anything unless of course they scale down to our level to cause chaos but whatever.
He also plays with madness at the mere sight of these things or learning about them but it just comes off as silly to me as there is really no reason for this besides that theyre uber advanced and we are pointless, and yet nothing happens.
Events that take place are usually isolated to a handful of characters to make it scary but whatever cause at the end of the day the blobs of madness are just whatever and the fear lies in that nobody is aware of them besides the ones who had the experience. But nothing ever happens even though there several of these entities so from now on I am going to assume the lovecraft characters who have these experiences are just that, insane. Yep the the whole lovecraft universe is just a hallucination tapped into by any of the main characters and what drives them insane is its own babble which is well represented as giant sentient blobs of madness.
And that basically describes lovecraft. So the next time someone makes a comment about cthulu I will respond with boat. If someone goes on about azathoth, i will think oh that blob in space that isnt going to do shit and whos form I could never comprehend so why bother.

ps-also the names, cmon.

You sound like you have no imagination whatsoever.

Incidentally there's a story of his that pokes fun at basically everything you said. Can't recall the name, though...

Loop Stricken:
You sound like you have no imagination whatsoever.

Incidentally there's a story of his that pokes fun at basically everything you said. Can't recall the name, though...

I have plenty of imagination and
give me the name of that story.

You have to take into context that these stories were written a long time ago. There is very little comparable to the Lovecraftian mythos in the supernatural or horror literature of the era, and the rare stuff that comes closest, like Hodgson's The Night Land is even more obscure than Lovecraft ever was.

The pacing of the stories is also very much of that era. The aforementioned Night Land was written even earlier, in 1912, and compared to that Lovecraft's work is fast paced.

I find the atmospheric descriptions of some of the locations where the stories take place more unsettling than the monsters themselves. Pickman's Model, the Shadow over Innsmouth, The Whisperer in the Darkness and The Colour out of Space are some examples of Lovecraft evoking a very strong sense of place.

Perhaps he's not scary to a modern reader, but the ideas and, as I mentioned, the atmosphere, is way ahead of the norm for that time. I think he holds up rather well.

CODE-D:

Loop Stricken:
You sound like you have no imagination whatsoever.

Incidentally there's a story of his that pokes fun at basically everything you said. Can't recall the name, though...

I have plenty of imagination and
give me the name of that story.

I can't remember! For all I know it's un-nameable, like all his insanity-inducing cyclopean horrors.

Sixcess:
You have to take into context that these stories were written a long time ago. There is very little comparable to the Lovecraftian mythos in the supernatural or horror literature of the era, and the rare stuff that comes closest, like Hodgson's The Night Land is even more obscure than Lovecraft ever was.

The pacing of the stories is also very much of that era. The aforementioned Night Land was written even earlier, in 1912, and compared to that Lovecraft's work is fast paced.

I find the atmospheric descriptions of some of the locations where the stories take place more unsettling than the monsters themselves. Pickman's Model, the Shadow over Innsmouth, The Whisperer in the Darkness and The Colour out of Space are some examples of Lovecraft evoking a very strong sense of place.

Perhaps he's not scary to a modern reader, but the ideas and, as I mentioned, the atmosphere, is way ahead of the norm for that time. I think he holds up rather well.

Pretty much this.

Lovecraft's thing was cosmic horror. Not horror at a particular unfortunate event, but a much grander scale of horror where the universe either doesn't care or is sustained by creatures who just want to fuck you up.

Again, this may not be so big of a thing these days seeing as everyone and their dog is some kind of existential nihilist or whatever.

Also you have to bear in mind, we have a much better idea of what's out there nowadays than they did then.

The fear in Lovecraft is a fear of the unknown. Of a universe that is so vast that humans can't even comprehend a fraction of it. We are so small and weak, whose to say there aren't things out there that are to us as we are to ants. Massive entities of such incredible age and harboring such unknowable malice for lesser existence that their mere EXISTENCE threatens our species as a whole. That if one of them were to turn an errant eye, on accident, and spy us across the vastness of the cosmos then our fates would be sealed before we could even cry for help. And no power, religion or science, can hope to stay this inevitability. Our only respite is that these beings either haven't noticed us yet, or are having too much fun molding and shaping our fragile lives.

It's the fear of the deep ocean, of great terrors so close and yet hidden from our plain sight. It's a fear of your your fellow man, of the hidden urges and desires held in their heart and your own. It's the fear of knowledge, of the insatiable thirst for understanding that leads to these truths, and the inevitable refuge in insanity that must follow.

Yeah, if you are just focusing on his monsters you have no imagination.

Sixcess:
You have to take into context that these stories were written a long time ago. There is very little comparable to the Lovecraftian mythos in the supernatural or horror literature of the era, and the rare stuff that comes closest, like Hodgson's The Night Land is even more obscure than Lovecraft ever was.

The pacing of the stories is also very much of that era. The aforementioned Night Land was written even earlier, in 1912, and compared to that Lovecraft's work is fast paced.

I find the atmospheric descriptions of some of the locations where the stories take place more unsettling than the monsters themselves. Pickman's Model, the Shadow over Innsmouth, The Whisperer in the Darkness and The Colour out of Space are some examples of Lovecraft evoking a very strong sense of place.

Perhaps he's not scary to a modern reader, but the ideas and, as I mentioned, the atmosphere, is way ahead of the norm for that time. I think he holds up rather well.

the stories you listed are actually a bit creepy but notice how they have less to do with the cosmic horror hes known for.
But they couldve been better or at least in the case of innsmouth.

Only experience with Lovecraft is the Bethesda game and it was amazingly scary.

When Lovecraft wrote his stories, mankind knew considerably less about the universe than we do today, and the idea that the universe just does not care, that there is no benevolent god that watches over us, was still kind of new and terrifying.
Yeah, his writing isn't scary by modern standards, but he's very good at evoking an atmosphere of disquiet.

Also, The Colour out of Space is as cosmic and horrible as cosmic horror gets.

CODE-D:
lovecraft is not really scary

As the dude once said,
yeah, well...that's just like...your opinion man.
If you don't find the themes of madness and the vast unknown in Lovecraft's works at the very least horrifying and disturbing, you're doing something wrong.

maybe we're just different, but I think he's awesome. I enjoy his books very much. If you want really terrifying horror, I suggest you turn your head to real-world events. Not much is more frightening than the prospect of living in certain parts of the world. If you want entertaining horror, Lovecraft is one of the best.

Lovecraft was trying to capture a kind of horror that's like if you were an ant, and you suddenly discovered humans.

To the ant, the humans are giant boots that crush and destroy without reason or cause, can kill hundreds of your friends in a matter of seconds, and cannot be reasoned with or defeated. To the human, ants are just ants. Something not sentient or worthy of your concern, something you don't care about if you happen to step on one (you might not even realize you DID step on one).

It's perfectly understandable that this kind of horror isn't for everyone. But you have to admit it at least gets one thing right. The protagonists are usually totally helpless. That's how a horror character is supposed to be.

Verzin:

CODE-D:
lovecraft is not really scary

As the dude once said,
yeah, well...that's just like...your opinion man.
If you don't find the themes of madness and the vast unknown in Lovecraft's works at the very least horrifying and disturbing, you're doing something wrong.

maybe we're just different, but I think he's awesome. I enjoy his books very much. If you want really terrifying horror, I suggest you turn your head to real-world events. Not much is more frightening than the prospect of living in certain parts of the world. If you want entertaining horror, Lovecraft is one of the best.

yeah, well...that's just like...your opinion man.
Ya see why I dont really care for that slacker lebowskis line being quoted. He points out that I have an opinion and yes i do, otherwise I wouldnt have typed anything at all would I? And implies that no others have the same opinion as I but some do.
That line is going in my top worst lines to ever quote.

CODE-D:

Verzin:

CODE-D:
lovecraft is not really scary

As the dude once said,
yeah, well...that's just like...your opinion man.
If you don't find the themes of madness and the vast unknown in Lovecraft's works at the very least horrifying and disturbing, you're doing something wrong.

maybe we're just different, but I think he's awesome. I enjoy his books very much. If you want really terrifying horror, I suggest you turn your head to real-world events. Not much is more frightening than the prospect of living in certain parts of the world. If you want entertaining horror, Lovecraft is one of the best.

yeah, well...that's just like...your opinion man.
Ya see why I dont really care for that slacker lebowskis line being quoted. He points out that I have an opinion and yes i do, otherwise I wouldnt have typed anything at all would I? And implies that no others have the same opinion as I but some do.
That line is going in my top worst lines to ever quote.

you dare impugn the dudes honor? wtf man?
You're obviously a square.

also, the reason I quoted him was because you stated your case as an absolute.

EDIT: you may not have enjoyed it or felt it was scary, but there are people who do. You're whole point seems to revolve around how you didn't like the monsters or the insanity and thought that nothing ever happens.
O.K.
That's valid I 'guess', but I disagree that it's not frightening.

Verzin:

CODE-D:

Verzin:

As the dude once said,
yeah, well...that's just like...your opinion man.
If you don't find the themes of madness and the vast unknown in Lovecraft's works at the very least horrifying and disturbing, you're doing something wrong.

maybe we're just different, but I think he's awesome. I enjoy his books very much. If you want really terrifying horror, I suggest you turn your head to real-world events. Not much is more frightening than the prospect of living in certain parts of the world. If you want entertaining horror, Lovecraft is one of the best.

yeah, well...that's just like...your opinion man.
Ya see why I dont really care for that slacker lebowskis line being quoted. He points out that I have an opinion and yes i do, otherwise I wouldnt have typed anything at all would I? And implies that no others have the same opinion as I but some do.
That line is going in my top worst lines to ever quote.

you dare impugn the dudes honor? wtf man?
You're obviously a square.

also, the reason I quoted him was because you stated your case as an absolute.

oooooooh the hubris
I do indeed impugn on that "the dude"
image
And my opinions always absolute when I make a stance. I do not reason in this case for I am telling.

CODE-D:
I do not reason in this case for I am telling.

O.K. goodbye.

Verzin:

CODE-D:
I do not reason in this case for I am telling.

O.K. goodbye.

Yes I am done with this as well.

While I'm not going to say you lack imagination, I'd say you're not using it properly if you can't find the horror in Lovecraft. Saying "Cthulhu was rammed by a boat, so meh" is failing to comprehend it. Attila the Hun is not very impressive, because he was just a dude, correct? Well, not really - you have to consider more than that.

And what do you expect? What would you say it's scary? Because I am pretty sure I can reduce it to "not scary" the same way you did - by focusing on one aspect of it.

It was fun reading his works when i was a teenager
It probably does not hold up to anyones adult expectations nowadays

I particularly enjoyed the shadow out of time for its alien communication

CODE-D:
whos form I could never comprehend

That right there is the "scary" part of Lovecraft's style.

Some people are afraid of the familiar, seeing something they recognize made wrong, made evil. Stephen King's Cujo - a massive rabid dog terrorizing a mother and her frail child. It's all relatable, and it scares the bejesus out of some people.

Lovecraft works on the opposite side, trying to create fear out of something SO far out of this world that there's no safe comparison. These cosmic terrors are unlike anything you've ever seen both physically and psychologically. The fact that you CAN'T relate scares the bejesus out of other people.

To me, the scariest part of Lovecraft is his dialogue, some of his stories drown you in really awkward exposition. I love the worlds the guy could create, but navigating them can be a grind.

Sixcess:
You have to take into context that these stories were written a long time ago. There is very little comparable to the Lovecraftian mythos in the supernatural or horror literature of the era, and the rare stuff that comes closest, like Hodgson's The Night Land is even more obscure than Lovecraft ever was.

Pretty much this. Things lose their "bite" as time moves on. A couple examples I can think of are Frankenstein and the movie The Exorcist

Frankenstein was considered to be the single most terrifying story of it's time...now it's little more than a piece of literature history. Same goes for The Exorcist. When it first came out, it was considered to be the single most terrifying movie ever made, and yet just like Frankenstein, it has become little more than a piece of cinema history.

I believe that the closest modern equivalent to Lovecraft is creepypastas, of all things, because they're presented in similar formats, many pretending to be last diary entries or notes written to warn others, and quote pieces of writing they 'found' in the course of the story. And of course they're both delivered to the reader in modern ways, Lovecraft was originally serialised in those newfangled magazines and creepypastas use the internet. They also deal with issues of the age in the most effective stories, a lot of the best (I use this objectively) creepypastas focus on technology, and it's possession by outside forces or simply being malevolent in itself; while Lovecraft dealt with the isolation of man in the universe and even on earth, in the Whisperer in the Darkness one man living in a secluded house miles away from the nearest town is the only one who knows enough about the foreign creatures to attempt to stop them. So if you want what Lovecraft offered back in the day but aren't getting it in his work, which is understandable in a world where we know a lot more about space and many people's default mood about life seems to be "It sucks, why am I alive anyway?" then read a creepypasta or twenty, they are addictive as hell.

I would be interested what story you were reading. Because I agree there are a few terribly boring ones like the Cats of Ulthar and then there's sheer horror that makes you afraid of keeping doors or windows unlocked at night even in mid summer like The Dunwich Horror or various short stories.

Loop Stricken:

CODE-D:

Loop Stricken:
You sound like you have no imagination whatsoever.

Incidentally there's a story of his that pokes fun at basically everything you said. Can't recall the name, though...

I have plenty of imagination and
give me the name of that story.

I can't remember! For all I know it's un-nameable, like all his insanity-inducing cyclopean horrors.

According to TV Tropes, a story named The Unnamable is a story that pokes fun at stuff that he's written. What an incredible coincidence.

CODE-D:

And that basically describes lovecraft. So the next time someone makes a comment about cthulu I will respond with boat. If someone goes on about azathoth, i will think oh that blob in space that isnt going to do shit and whos form I could never comprehend so why bother.

ps-also the names, cmon.

i must be reading some wrong.

The Case of Charles Dexter Ward made me laugh.

especially when he smells something awefull comming from behind him, knocking him unconcious.(if i remember right)

Of course he isn't really scary anymore. This isn't the 20's, and we've sort of gotten over the idea of our own insignificance.

I still read his stories, though. While I'm not really frightened by them, they're still entertaining. And honestly, isn't it a good sign of mankind's progression, that if a Shoggoth or some other Lovecraftian horror was found, we wouldn't be going mad by the mere unusualness and alien nature of it? Hell, we'd be all over the poor thing with instruments and cameras and whatnot. It'd be on a famous talkshow, explaining its motivations and feelings of humanity by the end of the week!

The fear of the unknown and the alien isn't nearly as all-present as it was back in Lovecraft's time, and the idea that we weren't under the ever-caring attention of some divine, well-meaning being in the very centre of the universe must have been harrowing in a way that is difficult for modern readers to recognize back when Lovecraft lived.

And lest we forget, he was also a massive racist. No wonder his main theme is fear for the unknown, when he couldn't even speak to a black person without breaking out in cold sweat by the way he goes on about them in his stories. If it isn't some scheeming jew behind it all, it's some primitive, spear-chucking tribe in the south seas, sacrificing people to the Deep Ones at the drop of a hat.

Again, I don't find Lovecraft very scary, either. I read a few of his stories once in a creeky old house on the countryside with late-summer pitch black outside (Complete with scary winds), and slept like a baby as soon as I put out the candle. But I still read them, even if they don't meet my personal horror-criteria.
For instance, one of my favorite LC-stories is one about a WW1-era German submarine captain, who finds himself adrift and alone inside his sub, at the very deepest depths of the ocean. It's still tickling my imagination. What could be there? Who built those ruins? To what purpose? And what could dwell within?

While his favorite methods of frightening me doesn't work anymore (Creatures so unfathomably alien that they defy description, going mad by a glimpse of the same, us humans being like mould in a petry dish) because I live in a different century (and doesn't have a mind built out of wafers as opposed to every Lovecraft protagonist), he still sparks my imagination, and that is really all that I ask of a good book.

Lovecraft's style is essentially that we're all ants in a universe filled with giants and incomprehensible landscapes. They don't care about us and will crush us without a second thought. Personally, I find to be a refreshing divergence from the typical "Normal but with something really wrong" style of horror where you can relate to the character but instead have a world where there are creatures so horrifying that looking at them drives people insane. Then you can let your mind do the work for you.

My favourite piece of his mythos is R'lyeh, the sunken city with impossible architecture. It's something that you can imagine being so alien that it's terrifying.

RJ 17:
Things lose their "bite" as time moves on. A couple examples I can think of are Frankenstein and the movie The Exorcist

Frankenstein was considered to be the single most terrifying story of it's time...now it's little more than a piece of literature history. Same goes for The Exorcist. When it first came out, it was considered to be the single most terrifying movie ever made, and yet just like Frankenstein, it has become little more than a piece of cinema history.

Frankenstein is about a bit more than simply horror though.

It's about being sub-human in a cruel world, kinda in the sense that Pinocchio and The Hunchback of the Notre Dame were.

Casual Shinji:

RJ 17:
Things lose their "bite" as time moves on. A couple examples I can think of are Frankenstein and the movie The Exorcist

Frankenstein was considered to be the single most terrifying story of it's time...now it's little more than a piece of literature history. Same goes for The Exorcist. When it first came out, it was considered to be the single most terrifying movie ever made, and yet just like Frankenstein, it has become little more than a piece of cinema history.

Frankenstein is about a bit more than simply horror though.

It's about being sub-human in a cruel world, kinda in the sense that Pinocchio and The Hunchback of the Notre Dame were.

:P That doesn't change the fact that when it was first published it was considered the most terrifying story of it's time.

It's not 'scary' to modern audiences, no. Everyone is desensitised with alien and human centipede. At the time it was written however it was Off the Wall. Right out there, out in space and people who didn't pooh pooh it for being boring old shits, even in a boring oldshit time, it blew minds. What it does succeed in however is being atmospheric and good fiction. Even if it isn't scary it can still keep you reading and reading and wanting to know what the sound is, what the fuck is going on and feeling just a little unsettled in the dark after finishing. No it isn't scary but that is because of a jaded generation, and that doesn't make it bad.

To be fair, it was way scarier back then, when we didn't have a great idea of what was in space/at the floor of the ocean/in volcanoes/whatever.

The only Lovecraft story I've read was Pickman's Model, which was pretty creepy and subtly horrific, but not outright scary.

I gotta admit, the only Lovecraft story I've read so far (out of about 8) that scared me was Shadow over Innsmouth, mainly because sea monsters, a eerie-ass town, and the dark night kinda all scare the shit outta me.

But as it's been said, Lovecraft mainly writes of a fear of the unknown, unlike more contemporary elements nowadays such as horrific beasts and building dread.

Cool.

What's your point? Fear is 100% subjective.

Lovecaft is and was scary. I don't find him frightening, but he's known for a reason.
In his time very little was known about the order of things, the universe, the ocean, the things in the dark. I think the best way to describe it is from his poem "Nemesis"
I have seen the dark universe yawning,
Where the black planets roll without aim;
Where they roll in their horror unheeded, without knowledge or lustre or name.

You can see what he thinks about the universe, our place in it being worthless.

A lot of this loses its sting when you can look up at the stars and tell almost everything about them. Know horrors greater than Cthulhu like a black hole, an object who's mass collapses time itself.
Lovecraft also has an annoying tendency for purple prose, using the same "indescribable"/"MADNESS!" copout (sorry but it kinda is) that writes him into a corner (Cthulhu getting KO'd by a boat- WTF?!). Although this was the style at the time, nowadays it's so passe it's funny and another reason why people like him so much.

However, Lovecraft is scary because he founded cosmic horror. And he remains scary because if you read with that mindset, that there are things out there we will never know about, that can brush our whole existence aside effortlessly (and could be right HERE on Earth); that's scary.
I know the scariest story I read of his was "The Color Out of Space" because it took the very idea of cosmic horror and didn't recede at the "MADNESS!" interval that all his stories have. It showed, in detail, what happens when forces like these intrude on humanity, it shows our helplessness and horror of the unknown.

Fear is not knowing, Horror is finding out, Terror is understanding

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