Calling all Autistics of the Escapist

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 NEXT
 

Nasrin:
Have you checked out this recent article on the subject?

Now that brings back memories! Especially the brushing; I had that treatment too.

I too have sensory integration disorder (also known as sensory integration dysfunction, sensory processing disorder, and a variety of such variations on the name); I never had it quite that bad in the same ways this child does, though. I did have serious auditory issues, though, and I had to be taught to catch myself when I fell (I'd just let my head smash into the pavement without putting my arms out) and I didn't feel pain properly for a long time (which results in odd things like a child who likes belly flopping off the top bunk b/c she doesn't know she's hurting herself). Mostly I'm okay now that I'm an adult, but in my childhood and teenage years, there were some really weird issues.

persephone:

Nasrin:
Have you checked out this recent article on the subject?

Now that brings back memories! Especially the brushing; I had that treatment too.

I too have sensory integration disorder (also known as sensory integration dysfunction, sensory processing disorder, and a variety of such variations on the name); I never had it quite that bad in the same ways this child does, though. I did have serious auditory issues, though, and I had to be taught to catch myself when I fell (I'd just let my head smash into the pavement without putting my arms out) and I didn't feel pain properly for a long time (which results in odd things like a child who likes belly flopping off the top bunk b/c she doesn't know she's hurting herself). Mostly I'm okay now that I'm an adult, but in my childhood and teenage years, there were some really weird issues.

I'm so glad to hear the article helped!

Lugbzurg:
I am autistic. I have Aspergers, and it's awesome.

It's what has made me who I am, and I would not trade it away. I say this, because, there are people out to "cure" autism, thinking it's a disease. It's not. Not in the slightest. If someone were trying to inject me with a needle that would remove my aspergers, I would have to give them several warnings, before beating them senseless. You kill my aspergers, you pretty much kill me. It's how I've been able to create everything I've come up with, and why I tend to be so different from everyone else. And I love it! I just can't stand normality, and often walk backwards down the hall, or strike action poses or Matrix moves when doing something athletic, just for the fun of it. No one else around me seems to be like this, because, they all like to be normal.

If it weren't for my autism, I never would have come up with the following under my own completely standard mindset...

Oh my God, SO MUCH THIS!!

OT: I was diagnosed with Aspergers after 3 grade (ie, when I was about 8 or 9). I had gotten bullied severely then, to the point I became physically ill because I didnt want to go to school. And the part that really got me mad is that when I went into the nurses office because I was bleeding and had Sandburr bushes stuck to me.

What did my principal say when I came in with those little balls of torture stuck to me? "He is faking it to get attention." She was fired the year after I left, and it still makes me PISSED when people say I am faking my Aspergers. I did NOT go through with it once just to have it happen again.

That said, you could not PAY me to want to get rid of my Aspergers. It makes me who I am, and I dont want to change. I like my photograhic memory too.

SmashLovesTitanQuest:
I wish I could read this thread but I have to laugh every time I read "aspie", so I cant.

I mean, could they have named this any more unfortunately? Why dont you just go ahead and call the whole syndrome dicklicker?

*Ahem*

Anyway.

I dont think I have ever met an aspie (heh) IRL. Kinda weird when you think about it, considering so many people are diagnosed.

But it's how you pronounce it. Is it a-spee or ass-pie?

Yup. Never actually seen one. I think I may have known a guy with high functioning autism. Wasn't sure. He was a quiet one.

ElPatron:

I am almost sure men are like that and it has nothing to do with his condition. I know. I a man.

Uh, no. One example doesn't prove anything. I'm male and I tend to be observant as fuck so as not to inconvenience people by being a selfish dumbfuck.

Destude:
You are all retarded.

that's just wrong dude...

Freechoice:
Uh, no. One example doesn't prove anything. I'm male and I tend to be observant as fuck so as not to inconvenience people by being a selfish dumbfuck.

Yeah, it works when your mind is clear.

When you're absolutely pissed off at the whole world, stressed out and your loved one hurt you there is a lot of ways you can be insensitive.

ElPatron:

Freechoice:
Uh, no. One example doesn't prove anything. I'm male and I tend to be observant as fuck so as not to inconvenience people by being a selfish dumbfuck.

Yeah, it works when your mind is clear.

When you're absolutely pissed off at the whole world, stressed out and your loved one hurt you there is a lot of ways you can be insensitive.

Isn't that true for everyone then? Why just make a blanket assumption that men are worse at it than women? Because it's true for you?

I was diagnosed with Aspergers at a relatively late age of 11. It was deemed a borderline case. Not sure what else there is to say.

Doclector:
I think I was diagnosed with aspergers when I was 8. Didn't really bother me, but of course, the stigma is what did the most damage. The school parading it around didn't help. "gifted and talented"...BS. That ain't what it is, and it certainly ain't what you're treated as.

So, I was bullied. This damaged me far more than aspergers ever did. That I didn't really understand the social rules never bothered me, I just knew right from wrong, as long I stuck with that, I didn't care, and in recent years I've found many people don't care either. For years after school though, I was afraid to socially interact. I thought it'd all happen again. I couldn't see why not.

Now I'm at uni. It's a lot better. It bought me far out of my shell, but I still have issues, issues which I believe to be more about the treatment I recieved because of my aspergers than the "disease" itself.

I feel you mate. At the age of four, or three, I was falsely diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. Didn't really get it (I was a little kid, why would I?) but as I got older, and understood how the treatment of me partitioned me from everyone else, it started the snowball effect (along with many other things, including a failed relationship, some extraordinarily proficient psychological bullying, etc) into clinical depression. Which does not go away.

In any case, I was reevaluated a few years ago after vehemently refusing all segregation attempts (I shit you not, they got someone to try to trick me into filling out my yearly evaluation). Records were gone over. You'd be amazed how many false diagnoses there are for Autism and Asperger's just because the psychologist wants to slap a label on it and validate his bill.

It turns out I'm a very highly functioning sociopath, though. Too little, too late in my opinion. Depression (which I would not have if it weren't for this mess) doesn't go away. It's fixed, but ever present. Hell, I'd be willing to bet that my sociopathy developed as a defense mechanism. Those fuckers took my childhood and ruined me.

I'm finding the ignorance of the naysayers quite unnerving.

Freechoice:
Isn't that true for everyone then? Why just make a blanket assumption that men are worse at it than women? Because it's true for you?

Wow, The Escapist is at it again. I can hear the cries of "sexism" already.

I never said that women aren't annoying as fuck. I know they are from personal experience and there are things that piss them off for no reason. Same with men. I know that if my day was bullshit and I found my girlfriend did something I wouldn't want to talk about, I'd get pissed at showerheads.

Combine Rustler:
Hello Escapist, my name is Nyistnyeblkj Arflksdfnhgh, and I'm here to talk about my ass burgers. I have suffered much abuse because of these would-be burgers throughout my life, and I want, nay, DESERVE your attention and pity, for I want nothing more than to be accepted and cared about. Shovel your sympathy unto me right about now.

remialcsiD: I od ton evah ssa sregrub. m'I tsuj a lufetah elttil kcirp.

I laughed. +1 internet too you.

I have Autism, and while it has made life difficult for me, I've learned to love it, and do you know what? If someone could get rid of it, I wouldn't want them to.

HO got a new one for ya, i gotz the Dyslexia next to autistic. no really. that first sentence. you don even know how much you could not read this post if not for spell check o.o diagnosed by my parents which are M.D.s at 4/5, and for all you fellows let me save you some thinking, the school, didn't do a thing, said my parents couldn't possibly know that, scheduled me for testing, lost my name, elementary all the way to high school didn't do a freakin thing, and i got officially tested at 17, and came out positive for Dyslexia. It may be a joke to some of you, and it may be fake or "blown out of proportion(<--- had to Google that one)", but to me and my family and my wife, its painfully real. I would not hug my sisters or parents, i rebelled against everyone trying to talk to me and get close. I've never had many friends, never been good at talking, never good at writing. do you know how hard that makes life? take your life and times by ten. in today's world you need to able to talk to people and write and i can't do that! (i can type due to spell check). I get pretty heated over this because i have become a Psychologist, because i did get help, now i try and help parents understand their child, and children to cope with their gifts. Yeah, gifts. Its made my life harder, but i like being autistic. Makes life more interesting, and clearer.

Detective Prince:
I don't have autism however my fiancÚ does have Asperger's. It does make our relationship incredibly strained at times. He has me but he won't interact with many other people including his own family he's withdrawn from. He can be incredibly pedantic at times. He doesn't quite get why I get upset about things he does and he can not cope with change. I changed the shower head a few weeks ago because the thing was caked in limescale. Turned into a whole "thing" and it still is.

On the opposite side here, cause my darling wife is normal and I'm autistic. Thing is to be patient with him, emotions are concepts (as in more pictures) not easily understood to autism.
try explaining to him, tell him what you are feeling and why you think feel that way. its what me and my wife do when she wants to change something or has something going on, she explains to me why and gives reasons, basically puts into a picture/ easily understood way. You see because artistic thinks in pictures and In a 3D sense, so you need to put it in terms of a picture and reason. BUT even if this doesn't work, just remember, number one rule: be patient, cause you can not ask an autistic so sit down.

ElPatron:

Freechoice:
Isn't that true for everyone then? Why just make a blanket assumption that men are worse at it than women? Because it's true for you?

Wow, The Escapist is at it again. I can hear the cries of "sexism" already.

I never said that women aren't annoying as fuck. I know they are from personal experience and there are things that piss them off for no reason. Same with men. I know that if my day was bullshit and I found my girlfriend did something I wouldn't want to talk about, I'd get pissed at showerheads.

Well don't make ignorant blanket statements then. It's not that hard.

Binnsyboy:

Doclector:
I think I was diagnosed with aspergers when I was 8. Didn't really bother me, but of course, the stigma is what did the most damage. The school parading it around didn't help. "gifted and talented"...BS. That ain't what it is, and it certainly ain't what you're treated as.

So, I was bullied. This damaged me far more than aspergers ever did. That I didn't really understand the social rules never bothered me, I just knew right from wrong, as long I stuck with that, I didn't care, and in recent years I've found many people don't care either. For years after school though, I was afraid to socially interact. I thought it'd all happen again. I couldn't see why not.

Now I'm at uni. It's a lot better. It bought me far out of my shell, but I still have issues, issues which I believe to be more about the treatment I recieved because of my aspergers than the "disease" itself.

I feel you mate. At the age of four, or three, I was falsely diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. Didn't really get it (I was a little kid, why would I?) but as I got older, and understood how the treatment of me partitioned me from everyone else, it started the snowball effect (along with many other things, including a failed relationship, some extraordinarily proficient psychological bullying, etc) into clinical depression. Which does not go away.

In any case, I was reevaluated a few years ago after vehemently refusing all segregation attempts (I shit you not, they got someone to try to trick me into filling out my yearly evaluation). Records were gone over. You'd be amazed how many false diagnoses there are for Autism and Asperger's just because the psychologist wants to slap a label on it and validate his bill.

It turns out I'm a very highly functioning sociopath, though. Too little, too late in my opinion. Depression (which I would not have if it weren't for this mess) doesn't go away. It's fixed, but ever present. Hell, I'd be willing to bet that my sociopathy developed as a defense mechanism. Those fuckers took my childhood and ruined me.

Yeah, god knows what they'd tag me with if I let pyschologists anywhere near me nowadays. Hell, at one point, I actually seeked psychiatric help, but this is the UK, when it comes to mental health they love their labels, and they hate actually giving treatment. Now I know I'm not completely okay, and I get the feeling I never will be, but I'm damn better than I've ever been, and who knows what kind of damage they'll cause if I let them look me over again. People can call you crazy all they like, but they don't really mean it until there's a name for it.

Erana:

Lumber Barber:

Erana:

No, stop that. Even joking, that just hurts truly Autistic people.

I think it's time they learned to take a joke then. Here's a list of things that should offend me:
-Holocaust jokes (grandparent is a holocaust survivor)
-Any Jewish jokes
-Any jokes about depressed people, I have a history of depression
-Jokes about psychologists, I still have therapy so I should be very offended if anyone laughs about the psychologists
And there are probably others I can dig up. And yet, I still laugh at those jokes because they mean no harm to anyone, they're just what they are; a joke.In fact, I think some self-deprecating humor is always healthy for you!

Discrimination against people with Autism is too real a thing to be joking about it right now. I quoted two other people from a two-page thread on autism making genuinely negative comments against people with the disorder at the same time I was quoting you, and a third person did so while I was typing.

Too. Fucking. Soon.

When people like that stop being serious about their hateful comments, then you can make your jokes all you want.

I have one thing to say
thank you for your amazing amount of empathy and not resorting to bashing the disorder like the other people in this thread

Lumber Barber:

gigastar:

You know the last time i heard someone say that to my face i literally took three steps back then delivered a running punch to the guys face. Cost me a months suspension and all internet during that time and an assault charge, but i felt it to be worth it.

Why? Because impairment jokes are only funny one time, any more than that and youre tempting fate, especially when those who have said impairment can hear you and have no physical impairments.

Oh also take it from me, people with Aspergers dont take jokes at thier expense very well.

My post makes a lot more sense without snipping out most of it. as I said before, a bit of self-deprecating humor is always healthy for you. I'm not talking about directly insulting people with autism, that's just sick behavior. My beginning joke wasn't really directed at any form of autism. I also think that people who are COMPLETELY unable to take my joke as a, y'know, joke, not an insult to them, would not be able to browse the Escapist!

If you're going to go the "People need to learn to laugh at themselves" route, you should take a little more responsibility for what's coming out of your mouth. (or in this case, what you're writing) You are fully aware that this is a sensitive issue. If you're going to go there, you better make a real effort to try to show people that its fun to laugh at themselves, or just keep your jokes to yourself.

Also, think about where you're doing this. I'd be pretty pissed if there was a thread in which people were sharing their stories about coping with, say, their parents having divorced when they were a child and someone without any apparent investment or empathy on the issue just waltzed in and started making bad jokes at our expense.

At the very least, if you're going to pull something like this and you wind up insulting people, you could try apologizing and being friendly instead of insulting the users of this website.

Erana:

MammothBlade:
Not as of yet diagnosed, but I "very likely" have aspergers. I have a proper assessment this month.

Urgh, not knowing something like that is scary. One doctor told me that I'm epileptic, but two others disputed it, saying that I just have "abnormal, but healthy" brainwaves.
I was so relieved to not have to take those terrifying seizure medications, I didn't think to ask what that means. :/

Still, I'm not Autistic, but I totally throw my support in for my fellow Escapists who are. Yall're just you, nothing more and nothing less, and the only thing having the diagnosis should do is give you resources to more easily deal with the issue.

Yeah, I know. I was close to being diagnosed with schizophrenia because a therapist mistook my weird obsessive thoughts for psychosis. I'm sure the medications would have been terrible.

Doclector:
I think I was diagnosed with aspergers when I was 8. Didn't really bother me, but of course, the stigma is what did the most damage. The school parading it around didn't help. "gifted and talented"...BS. That ain't what it is, and it certainly ain't what you're treated as.

So, I was bullied. This damaged me far more than aspergers ever did. That I didn't really understand the social rules never bothered me, I just knew right from wrong, as long I stuck with that, I didn't care, and in recent years I've found many people don't care either. For years after school though, I was afraid to socially interact. I thought it'd all happen again. I couldn't see why not.

Now I'm at uni. It's a lot better. It bought me far out of my shell, but I still have issues, issues which I believe to be more about the treatment I recieved because of my aspergers than the "disease" itself.

Pretty much sums it up.

I was never actually diagnosed with any mental disorder (or if I was my parents never told me), but reading about it, looking back at how I thought and acted -- how I still think and act in some ways -- I could make a strong case for high function autism. I don't see much point in being tested, I've had the last thirty years to figure out on my own just how far off the median I am, I don't need a doctor to tell me. Don't want to contemplate pills, either. My friends have taken them, there's always a laundry list of side effects. Pills don't actually fix the problem, they just move the problem into some other area of your life.

Certainly my physical ineptitude, facility with numbers and patterns, and difficulty with social interaction have caused me far more grief than good. I was thrown into a "gifted and talented" program that very nearly turned me off from learning altogether. And the other kids, they don't understand why you're not exactly like them, they only understand they must punish you for your differences. Basic law of human interaction.

MammothBlade:

Yeah, I know. I was close to being diagnosed with schizophrenia because a therapist mistook my weird obsessive thoughts for psychosis. I'm sure the medications would have been terrible.

I am currently in the process of seeing a psychiatrist under the possibility that I may be schizophrenic. The reason I wanted to share that is because I have some idea of the medication that is commonly used and to say that they're actually quite reluctant to give medication to you unless it's a last resort or there is personal or social danger involved.

Also you'd need to display more than one symptom for an extended period of time (assuming in this case 'obsessive thoughts' is roughly its own thing).

Cavan:

MammothBlade:

Yeah, I know. I was close to being diagnosed with schizophrenia because a therapist mistook my weird obsessive thoughts for psychosis. I'm sure the medications would have been terrible.

I am currently in the process of seeing a psychiatrist under the possibility that I may be schizophrenic. The reason I wanted to share that is because I have some idea of the medication that is commonly used and to say that they're actually quite reluctant to give medication to you unless it's a last resort or there is personal or social danger involved.

Also you'd need to display more than one symptom for an extended period of time (assuming in this case 'obsessive thoughts' is roughly its own thing).

Fair enough, I was probably overreacting with worst case scenarios at the time.

I heard a theory (imprinted brain theory) that schizophrenia and autism may well be the opposite things - autism featuring underdeveloped, underactive theory of mind, whereas schizophrenia involves an overdeveloped, overactive theory of mind which goes paranoid and delusional. Those with autistic spectrum conditions have more mechanistic, systematic thinking, whereas those on the schizotypal spectrum have tendencies towards empathising or mentalising - to the point that they can hear other peoples' voices loudly in their head. Yet I've heard of several people with autistic spectrum conditions who have schizophrenia too, which either puts their diagnosis or that theory into serious doubt. Also, there are quite a few people - think John Nash - who are scientifically and mathematically gifted yet have full-blown paranoia. It's an oversimplistic explanation, but it's worth a look.

Doclector:

Binnsyboy:

Doclector:
I think I was diagnosed with aspergers when I was 8. Didn't really bother me, but of course, the stigma is what did the most damage. The school parading it around didn't help. "gifted and talented"...BS. That ain't what it is, and it certainly ain't what you're treated as.

So, I was bullied. This damaged me far more than aspergers ever did. That I didn't really understand the social rules never bothered me, I just knew right from wrong, as long I stuck with that, I didn't care, and in recent years I've found many people don't care either. For years after school though, I was afraid to socially interact. I thought it'd all happen again. I couldn't see why not.

Now I'm at uni. It's a lot better. It bought me far out of my shell, but I still have issues, issues which I believe to be more about the treatment I recieved because of my aspergers than the "disease" itself.

I feel you mate. At the age of four, or three, I was falsely diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome. Didn't really get it (I was a little kid, why would I?) but as I got older, and understood how the treatment of me partitioned me from everyone else, it started the snowball effect (along with many other things, including a failed relationship, some extraordinarily proficient psychological bullying, etc) into clinical depression. Which does not go away.

In any case, I was reevaluated a few years ago after vehemently refusing all segregation attempts (I shit you not, they got someone to try to trick me into filling out my yearly evaluation). Records were gone over. You'd be amazed how many false diagnoses there are for Autism and Asperger's just because the psychologist wants to slap a label on it and validate his bill.

It turns out I'm a very highly functioning sociopath, though. Too little, too late in my opinion. Depression (which I would not have if it weren't for this mess) doesn't go away. It's fixed, but ever present. Hell, I'd be willing to bet that my sociopathy developed as a defense mechanism. Those fuckers took my childhood and ruined me.

Yeah, god knows what they'd tag me with if I let pyschologists anywhere near me nowadays. Hell, at one point, I actually seeked psychiatric help, but this is the UK, when it comes to mental health they love their labels, and they hate actually giving treatment. Now I know I'm not completely okay, and I get the feeling I never will be, but I'm damn better than I've ever been, and who knows what kind of damage they'll cause if I let them look me over again. People can call you crazy all they like, but they don't really mean it until there's a name for it.

Well, I've looked at it objectively, and I admit I probably am something of a sociopath, but my point is they were wrong before. And that damage is permanent.

Aspergers here! Must have been diagnosed at about 16, possibly 17 - I honestly can't remember the exact date, but hey. Funny thing is, it all kind of started with Christian Western Chandler - I decided to research Autism just to prove to myself that he didn't have it, and after looking at the symptoms, I thought "Haaaang on a minute..."
Obviously, I wasn't going to be happy with a self diagnosis, so I mulled the idea over, told a teacher in about the last year of secondary school, got sent to a mind-doctor (Not sure if he was an actual physiologist or not, so I'm using that for now.) And, well, long story short, they diagnosed me with Aspergers.
... And Mild ADHD.
... And Mild dispraxia.
... And something else I've forgotten, despite hearing it not 3 days ago.

Yeah, given the lateness of the diagnosis, plus how mild everything turned out, I actually don't think it's disabled me that much. In fact, I personally consider myself pretty damn lucky, if only because my personality seems to work so well with my disabilities - I mean, I'm self confidant without being too arrogant (Most of the time, anyway. I think so, at least.) Self-critical when I need to be, logical, not afraid to try new things, a very quick learner, scientific (In that I feel the need to experiment a lot when I come up with a theory.) ... In fact, it feels like, if our life was but a game, I've been created by a guy who wanted to min-max the SHIT out of me.'

Now all I have to do is go back to the mind doctor and see if my self-diagnosis of paranoia is justified...

I am touched and happy with the response that I have gotten from this thread, trolls notwithstanding (its the internet, what can you do?)

Still, I think there are a few things I've seen that popped up in this thread.

CrazyGirl17:
(Waves) Hi, I was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome when I was four or five years old, but have been in mainstream schooling ever since third grade (and whoever said people with Asperger's are good at math never met me...)

I have much disdain for people who are "self-proclaimed" Autistics, as well as people who use it as an excuse to be assholes, such as "he-who-shall-not-be-named"...

I have a confession to make.

The original purpose of this thread was to see if the "self-diagnosed man-child getting out of self-improvement" stereotype was true. I mean, it gets trumpeted a lot in these discussions, and while part of it lies in ones misunderstanding in what it means to be sick (ie if your sick you get treatment to get well again) it also rests with the fact that there are autistics out there who are, sadly, stupid! We have associated intellect to autism and aspergers, but they are not traits that are looked for when a diagnosis is made.

This socially-awkward Pokemon fan is someone I have never ran into. However, it might be just the company I keep, but I haven't even ran into one online.

I've ran into the "I have a feeling that I might be this" person, which I usually laugh off as they all have been higher-functioning people making it on their own and therefore a formal diagnosis would be a waste of time. But these people never would claim to have autism, nor use it to excuse rotten behaviour.

Now,I have heard of the occasional case of a rape defendant making an insanity plea on the grounds that they were autistic and honestly thought the victim wanted it. As sick as it makes me, I had to wonder if there are autistics who are so bad at reading social cues and body language that they would unknowingly rape someone, or if they are just using it as an excuse to get out of a heavy prison sentence and being listed on a sex offender registry? Much of that depends on how good of a get out of jail free card screaming autism is, regardless of whether or not the defendant actually has autism.

In my humble opinion, its only good for wriggling money out of the government. I'm using my disorder to help financing my education after all. I could go on ODSP if I wanted to. However, I am not interested in a variant of welfare, and I know I could make more money if I actually worked. Outside of that, it isn't very useful for deals unless you are lower-functioning. Lower-functioning as in can barely talk.

Now, most of the thread responds claim to have been diagnosed by a professional. Not scientific, but at least we aren't seeing any Chris-chens (or at least ones who aren't just trolls acting like assholes). Many of you still want to thrive independantly and aren't using the disorder as a trump card.

So, unless you think their faking for a free pass, if they say their autistic, their probably autistic.

Athinira:
Diagnosed with Aspergers at 21 (mild case fortunately). Dealt with it for the most part through behavior-training (or rehabilitation), but it's impossible to completely escape, given that it's a a genetical trait.

I recommend others diagnosed with Aspergers who feel that they have trouble socializing, to give it a shot like me. There is a lot of books and courses that can help you. I actually started out with dating/pickup material from David DeAngelo, since a lot of the stuff he teaches about attraction also works in pretty much all other social interaction, including building confidence, being humorous etc. I've got much more control over my behavior now, and find that people respond to me more positively.

Actually that is a treatment option that is advocated by the pros themselves to patients. Part of life is having to deal with other people, whether you like it or not, on a regular bases. No man is an island, right?

SmashLovesTitanQuest:
I wish I could read this thread but I have to laugh every time I read "aspie", so I cant.

I mean, could they have named this any more unfortunately? Why dont you just go ahead and call the whole syndrome dicklicker?

*Ahem*

Anyway.

I dont think I have ever met an aspie (heh) IRL. Kinda weird when you think about it, considering so many people are diagnosed.

Well, Aspergers Syndrome was named after a German psycologist named... Hans Asperger. Why would someone have the name turd sandwich? Well, actually the word 'asperger' is German for 'asparagus.' So in reality, its named after a vegetable!

Actually, that isn't much better.

Though, it is possible that you could go your day-to-day life and not know an autistic person. Throughout my life I've only had one gay friend despite 1/10 of the population being gay/lesbian/bi.

It isn't helped that, like other groups, they tend to congregate in certain places. Like the internet.

BOOM headshot65:

Lugbzurg:
I am autistic. I have Aspergers, and it's awesome.

It's what has made me who I am, and I would not trade it away. I say this, because, there are people out to "cure" autism, thinking it's a disease. It's not. Not in the slightest. If someone were trying to inject me with a needle that would remove my aspergers, I would have to give them several warnings, before beating them senseless. You kill my aspergers, you pretty much kill me. It's how I've been able to create everything I've come up with, and why I tend to be so different from everyone else. And I love it! I just can't stand normality, and often walk backwards down the hall, or strike action poses or Matrix moves when doing something athletic, just for the fun of it. No one else around me seems to be like this, because, they all like to be normal.

If it weren't for my autism, I never would have come up with the following under my own completely standard mindset...

Oh my God, SO MUCH THIS!!

I'll be honest. This viewpoint creeps me out a little. I mean, its like being proud that your missing toes, or proud that you have a debilitating physical disorder like spina bifida. Sure, they are sever enough to hinder you, and force you to take certain paths, but take pride that there is something wrong with you?

Are you in denial? Are you scared that the treatment options will destroy what makes you you? That so much of your personality, and what makes you unique and special, hinge on this, that without it you cease to be? I've read that schizophrenics have similar misgivings about treatment. If you have hallucinations, some of which can be scary, you would want something done about it? If you are missing the ability to connect with others, don't you want something done about it?

I'm autistic myself, so I get it. However, autism is something that I have that hinders me, and while what hinders you is as just a part of you as what helps you, I can say straight-facedly that autism is not core to who I am. I'll say it to you: it is not the core of who you are.

I can prove it in a way.

Think of all the things you love in your life: people, places, things, franchises, and so forth. Ask yourself, if you were not autistic, would you love any of these less?

Now, you may, no question, love some of these things less. I mean, in my own case, I may not have entered gaming without the autism. Some of the obsessive behaviour needed for early games played into this, and much of my functionality as a human being is owed to The Legend of Zelda: Links Awakening for placing me in worlds where I could roam around with a higher purpose while learning the basics of reading and problem solving.

However, in my case, without the autism, would I have any less malplaced love for David Tennant? I mean, I'm 24, female, and straight. I'm also fat - this plays a role in the preferred body-type you want. My parents were in their thirties when I was born, which means I don't mind my 'hotties' (subjective, I know) to be older than myself. I live in North America, where people finding the British attractive is commonplace. As for discovering his existence in the first place, well, you don't need autism to be a nerd (though arguably it might help), and my parents (whom are not autistic) are big sci-fi and fantasy fans, and my mom is a big Doctor Who fan, so of course I would have seen episodes of the rebooted series, and later have that sad epiphany while reading on the web one night.

If I wasn't autistic anymore, would I rip up that one poster I have of him and erect one of Robert Pattinson instead? Course I'm not a fan of Twilight, and I think Rob doesn't look that attractive, and I think that if I was a normal human being that wouldn't change.

I could go on, but then this would be creepier than it already is.

Alas, some people want to 'cure' autism because most people with autism are going to be children forever, and this scares parents to death the thought that their kid will never go, move out, and start a family of their own. It isn't the maligned Pokemon fan either: they are my fatass brother who can barely string a sentence, has trouble comprehending spoken language himself, is strictly compulsive... this is someone who can't function in society and never really had a chance.

Though, my humble opinion. I would give pretty much anything to feel like a human being and not like an alien pretending to be human. I believe autism has done that to me. It has made me a stranger to my own self, and a stranger even in my own family. I want to connect with others, but they can't understand me, and I can't understand them.

In grade 6, I took medication that suppressed my Aspergers. And do you know what? Grade 6 was actually the happiest year of my life. I wasn't quite as sharp and my memory was dim, but I made friends and excelled in my classes. The medication later stopped working, so I stopped taking it, and while I still remember 6th Grade fondly, in hindsight... if given the chance to supress my Autism again, I wouldn't take it. Yes that year was the happiest of my life, but it wasn't part of my life... it was someone else living in my body.

I've learned that my Autism is who I am, and to supress it is tantamount to suicide. I would never kill the person I am like that again.

According to papers I got from the hospital (more on that in a bit), I was diagnosed with Aperger's Syndrome when I was in high school. Thing was, I didn't find this out until last summer, when I was released from the hospital, which I was 19 and done with high school for a year. Glad there were people out there to try to help me deal with this!

I was diagnosed with aspergers during third grade. I would never chose to make my autism go away.Is autism at my core, both yes and no. There are many things that have influenced who I am, but many of the traits that I would use to describe my self are characteristic of autism. This would probably change if I was moved to another country and elements of US culture was what made me stand out, but being around people with similar life experiences as me (middle class, white, American ect) I find traits affiliated with autism what makes me different, and I take pride in that difference. Autistic traits have helped and hurt me at different times. The feeling of isolation that comes from being autistic can at times be invigorating and at other times soul crushing. Typically I am so full of contempt for people that the not being able to connect to them is a source of pride rather than a source of pain. Though there are times when I would give anything for a hand to hold. I have been able to make friends through comptive debate (I competed four years in high school, four years in college and have coached for three years about to start my forth). Many debaters didn't hold my differences agensit me and won't my friends out of pity, instead we formed friendships out of mutual respect. For me therapy never worked because I distrusted anyone who wanted to "cure" me (that included my Mom for quit a while). In the end I only was able to trust the people on my debate team because they weren't the type of people that I was supposed to make friends with. My expernce have taught me to catorgize people. There are friends who you don't need to hide your autisitc traits from, there are idiot people in ahtority for you to minipulate by acting normal, and the hored of people who don't matter and you can ignore.

While I would never chose to be "cured" of autism I find it hard to stand in judgment of others who wish to be. While I was mostly mainstreamed I was around people with lower functioning autism kids who would never be able to go on a forum like this, who would never be able to take care of themselves. I couldn't tell the parent of that child that they shouldn't look for ways to get their child to a point where he could be self suffecent.

I was diagnosed with it when I was 19, barely a few months ago now. I had been diagnosed with depression prior and this new diagnosis basically helped identify why some treatments hadn't been working, why my social ticks were what they were, why the habits I kept repeating were ones I wasn't learning from and such. It's really helped and has given me a much better outlook on life since, because I know what I have and how to deal with it effectively instead of flailing around confused wondering why I'm having such a hard time, like, meeting new people. I see my very wonderful psychologist about once a month and thanks to the diagnosis I've entered what could be the happiest period of my life so far.

It's strange not growing up with the realization, my parents didn't want to get me diagnosed despite suspicions and so bought me up "normally," if that makes sense, and it gives me a great deal of perspective. I feel I'm better off for it, though certainly there would have been a great deal many advantages to knowing as a child rather than just as I reach adulthood.

My two little bros are autistic to varying degrees. Myself, I've no clue - I don't much care, since knowing won't change much.

Also, all the people making fun of & outright insulting autistic people in this thread need to do horrible things to themselves.

Mikodite:
Well, Aspergers Syndrome was named after a German psycologist named... Hans Asperger. Why would someone have the name turd sandwich? Well, actually the word 'asperger' is German for 'asparagus.' So in reality, its named after a vegetable!

We actually call it "Spargel" where I live, but maybe Germans named it differently a while ago.

I'm pretty sure 99% of the 'people' on this site call themselves autistic

FutureJarhead16:
I'm pretty sure 99% of the 'people' on this site call themselves autistic

What's with the scare quotes around the word people, are you implying that autistic people aren't actually people?

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 NEXT

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked