Is Homeopathy Bollocks?
Yes
88.6% (333)
88.6% (333)
No
4.5% (17)
4.5% (17)
I don't know much about it
6.1% (23)
6.1% (23)
Want to vote? Register now or Sign Up with Facebook
Poll: Homeopathy - Is it Bollocks?

 Pages PREV 1 2 3
 

babinro:

I completely agree with the idea that diluting something makes it less potent. This is common sense.

What I don't understand is what that has to do with the treatment that worked for my mother. Are you saying that 100% of homeopathy treatments involve diluted medicine?

If so, then perhaps the treatments given to my mother for her migraines were always to strong to work. As such, a diluted version of that medicine was all she needed. Either way, the end result was success.

The post you quoted already gave you possible explanations.

One things is for sure: the homeopathic "treatment" itself did absolutely nothing for your Mother.

is it proven by medical science? no? then it,s bullcrap. It might calm you but don,t use it for life saving stuff like cancer.

Had a really funny lecture about this in the second year of my biomedical science course, where our pharmacology lecturer debunked the entire thing. I reallly liked the section about in in Ben Goldacre's book Bad Science (which is a very good read!).

Homeopathy definatly seem like a load of absolute bollocks.
The dilution of the active ingredient only serves to weaken any effect it had in the first place.
It makes no sense as the supposed beneficial effects come from the process of dilution rather than just starting out with a small amount in the first place unless it was to prevent some kind of side effect from consuming a large amount of the active ingredient but thats is still sorted out by staring offf with a small amount.

This video is just... insane.

Homeopathy is for people who do not understand the placebo effect.

It's literally as simple as that.

Sad to see almost 5% of people voting believe this scam works.

Well, it's water...

I guess it helps if your problem is that you're thirsty?

babinro:
I guess I'm one of 4 people who said No.

I say this only because of my mother's personal experience. She suffered from migraines all her life. Despite seeing several different doctors and trying various different treatments, nothing helped her out.

After about 40 years of that she finally tried homeopathic medicine and it worked for her. Her migraines were entirely gone save a few normal headaches on occasion.

I find it hard to believe this could have finally been the one placebo effect that actually worked. As such, I choose to believe that homeopathic medicine genuinely worked for my mother.

Did your mother's treatment include any aroma therapy? Any herbal supplements?

Those aren't homeopathic. Those are actual chemicals that have an actual effect on the body. Herbal medicine is untested and tends to be hit or miss, but there are actual chemicals in there, so they actually can work. For example, "willow bark tea" is unrefined, random dose aspirin.

If she had ONLY homeopathic "medicine" then... yeah, placebo effect is the only real possibility. Or an environmental change (she moved, got a new mattress, changed the brand of coffee she drinks, started drinking more water to avoid dehydration, etc).

... actually, there's an idea. Since homeopathic "medicine" is basically just water, that only condition it would treat is dehydration.

I saw that Dara O'Briain one, it is fucking fantastic!

OT:

Yes, Homeopathy is utter crap!

It always amazes me what proportion of people are willing to throw science and reasoning out the window to believe in this crap. What worse is when they argue based entirely upon annecdotal evidence and forget that repeatable results that are distinguishable from a placebo are even remotely important. As I currently look at 4.9% (just under 1 in 20) believe in this scam, please let my faith be rewarded and make that number go down

Fuhrlock:
It always amazes me what proportion of people are willing to throw science and reasoning out the window to believe in this crap. What worse is when they argue based entirely upon annecdotal evidence and forget that repeatable results that are distinguishable from a placebo are even remotely important. As I currently look at 4.9% (just under 1 in 20) believe in this scam, please let my faith be rewarded and make that number go down

.
The solution to our problem is to try and show them why Homeopathy is bollocks in a simple manner. It worked with my father.

This video is about a well known magician debunking homeopathy. He actually explains everything very clearly.

Yes it is. Tiny quantities of good stuff haven't been shown to have any more effect than a similarly administered placebo. If someone showed me evidence in a double blind trial that homoeopathy is better than a placebo then as Tim said, I would change my mind. Sadly no convincing evidence of the like has come about.


My nan died of a homeopathic overdose because she forgot to take her pill.

babinro:

What I don't understand is what that has to do with the treatment that worked for my mother. Are you saying that 100% of homeopathy treatments involve diluted medicine?

Yes, all homeopathic remedies involve diluted medicines. Though there are some other 'alternative medicines' (I really hate that phrase) which are labeled as homeopathic despite not being actual homeopathic remedies. So there is the possiblity that your mom was taking, say, herbal supplements, and not actual homeopathic remedies.

If so, then perhaps the treatments given to my mother for her migraines were always to strong to work. As such, a diluted version of that medicine was all she needed. Either way, the end result was success.

If it was an actual homeopathic remedy, and if it was prepared correctly (according to homeopathic principles) then it should have been diluted far past the point where chemistry says it could cause any effect.

TheIronRuler:

Fuhrlock:
It always amazes me what proportion of people are willing to throw science and reasoning out the window to believe in this crap. What worse is when they argue based entirely upon annecdotal evidence and forget that repeatable results that are distinguishable from a placebo are even remotely important. As I currently look at 4.9% (just under 1 in 20) believe in this scam, please let my faith be rewarded and make that number go down

.
The solution to our problem is to try and show them why Homeopathy is bollocks in a simple manner. It worked with my father.

Wow really?

Didn't think your dad would change his mind

Some bloke walked into the pharmacy and asked me if we stock homeopathy stuff. I have rarely had to fight so hard to keep a straight face.

I feel quite worried that 5% of the escapist said 'no'. Even accounting for trolling and misreading of the poll title and such, that's still more than I'd expect.

Fyi I'd expect close to zero. The Escapist forums can usually be relied upon to include a smaller percentage of dipshits than the general population does.

Thanks guys for not crucifying my post...I really have limited knowledge on this stuff but I thought I would just share my beliefs anyway.

Of course you need meds for cancer and stuff like that. Don't they attack the cells directly? Thus making it impossible for your body to cure it?

Doesn't aids attack your immune system and make it so you can't recover from anything? Like, aids is not the thing that kills you, it stops your body from being able to cure a common cold and then you die from that?

That's why I am guessing there is no cure for cancer and aids yet because it is a lot more difficult to kill something bad disguised as something good without killing the good things. I realise that my post is real basic (I don't know the proper terminology and I am becoming a primary school teacher so I tend to explain things in the most basic way possible). I hope you understand what I mean.

I still think you only need meds for the serious stuff. I have a friend who is studying pharmacy so he would know a lot more than I would on this matter.

TheIronRuler:

Snotnarok:
The mind is a very powerful thing, and with enough thought, focus and time you can think a lot of things away.

You think those magnetic bracelets actually work? Of course they do, you MAKE them work by thinking and hoping they will. Without that though, no they're useless, unless you want to hang something on your fridge.

.
Magnetic Bracelets? You do understand what we are talking about, right?
If you want to bring other topics to light be my guest.

Yes I understand what you're talking about, the placebo effect that's the same thing with magnetic bracelets. I'm saying it's the same sort of thing.

TheIronRuler:

It was a theory. Apparently radiated water could cure lots of things in your system, believe it or not - CERTIFIED pure!

Well, it did work, in a way. Once you drink enough irradiated water, most other ailments you might suffer from would seem pretty minor, and maybe appear healed ;-)

Marik2:

TheIronRuler:

Fuhrlock:
It always amazes me what proportion of people are willing to throw science and reasoning out the window to believe in this crap. What worse is when they argue based entirely upon annecdotal evidence and forget that repeatable results that are distinguishable from a placebo are even remotely important. As I currently look at 4.9% (just under 1 in 20) believe in this scam, please let my faith be rewarded and make that number go down

.
The solution to our problem is to try and show them why Homeopathy is bollocks in a simple manner. It worked with my father.

Wow really?

Didn't think your dad would change his mind

.
Yep. It took me some time but I finally pulled him to the light side.

 Pages PREV 1 2 3

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked