Favourite Book series?

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 NEXT
 

I really like the Ender's Game Series by Orson Scott Card and the Baritmeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud

[Gavo]:

iwinatlife:
Wheel of time by Robert Jordan/Brandon Sanderson , Dan Abnett's Inquisitor trilogy of trilogies, Night angel Trilogy and Lightbringer series by Brent weeks,aaaaand A Song of Ice and Fire by George RR Martin

The last Wheel of Time book came out today.

I'm happy, yet sad.

I'm happy. A lot of the characters started to feel...Unwieldy? I guess I just felt like a lot of the progression was done with and the characters were getting into positions where they couldn't roam and adventure (becoming Amyrlin and stuff), so I'm glad it's gonna wrap up just as that feeling started to grow.

OP: Can you tell me some about the Dragonriders of Pern? My oldest sister really wanted me to get into them when I was a kid but at the time if it wasn't DragonLance or Forgotten Realms, I didn't give a shit.

EDIT TO ADD://

To be on topic, the Erevis Cale trilogy, A Song of Ice and Fire, the DragonLance Chronicles trilogy, 20th Century Boy, Hajime no Ippo, Yu Yu Hakusho, and other stuff that I own but probably can't recall off the top of the dome.

Isaac Asimov foundation series. It is remarkable how Asimov managed to fit almost all of his major books into one gigantic storyline.
Terry Pratchett discworld series. Gets better and also somewhat darker by every passing book.
Frank Herbert dune series. Space epic of unprecedented proportions.

Gavo:
The last Wheel of Time book came out today.

I'm happy, yet sad.

It did!? Finally, have to find it! So excited now!

OT:

Surprised I haven't seen these two series pop up yet.

Gentlemen Bastard Sequence by Scott Lynch. Excellent characters, interesting settings and circumstances. People die, and they die for a reason. Only two novels so far, but excellent reads none the less.

The Prince of Nothing series by Scott Bakkar. Some heavy stuff here steeped in what I assume is Bakkar's analysis of personal and moral philosophy in the face of impending doom. Still awesome fantasy, sabotage, deceit, epic battles, quandaries of love, very thoughtful.

mParadox:
Harry Potter by JK Rowling
Lord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien (yes, that includes the Hobbit and the Samallammarian)
A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R Martin (apparently, the R.R acronym is a thing now?)

Oooh what else.. Discworld by Terry Pratchett. I mean, you know 39 books and all, gotta count right? D:

Yea, I would have to say Discworld is my favorite. The others you mentioned (especially Potter) are really close but I always go back to Discworld.
When I get a chance I also plan to dive into Robert Rankin Witches series. I like his humor, very similar to Pratchett's. What drew me to him were his titles: things like Armageddon The Musical and Nostradamus Ate My Hamster.

Chris Wooding's Tales of the Ketty Jay series is a lot of fun.

The Dresden Files By Jim Butcher
Codex Alera by Jim Butcher
Night Angel Trillogy by Brent Weeks
I can never deside which one I like more. Probebly Dresden as it is still ongoing so I get to read more.

Honorable mentions goto:
The Lord of the Rings
Nightside series by Simon.R.Greene
Secret History series by Simon.R.Greene

bleys2487:
The Great Book of Amber by Roger Zelazny

Read it. GO NOW! :D

I went through the first few books in that one and lost steam but it is very interesting the most fluid mix of sci-fi and fantasy ive ever read

Animorphs, out of pure nostalgia value. I've been reading through it again, and its held up surprisingly well for a 90s kid's series.

Zeldias:

OP: Can you tell me some about the Dragonriders of Pern? My oldest sister really wanted me to get into them when I was a kid but at the time if it wasn't DragonLance or Forgotten Realms, I didn't give a shit.

Sure, although I'm not particularly good at describing books I like though.

The series focuses on a group of Dragon riders on the planet Pern who are tasked with defending the planet from Thread, a non-sentient thread-like spore that will rapidly devour anything organic, including coal, causing massive environmental damage. The Thread falls in 50 year periods when the Red Star completes its year, roughly 250 years. The first book deals with the problems resulting from a Long Interval where Thread does not fall for one of the predicted passes. As a result, the riders drop in number (already badly hit from a mass disappearance at the end of the last pass) until they have barely enough dragons to fill one weyr (basically, the rider's bases) when the previous pass needed six to defend fewer people. Meanwhile, the lords refuse to give the proper amount of food and supplies to the one remaining weyr (as the majority of people, including some riders, believe the Thread is wiped out) making issues worse. The first book deals with the above problems with some fairly well characterised and fleshed out characters.

The world of Pern is also fleshed out quite well with a well built social system regarding the holds (essentially the cities) containing the majority of the population along with the weyrs holding the riders who are often seen as exotic and apart from the world, although naturally, some see them as arrogant. The Holds and Weyrs effectively have separate moral systems as Weyrs almost exclusively chose from their own population which also results in problems later on.

The books also deal with various themes which weren't touched on too much when first released, being quite open about riders committing suicide after the death of their dragon and vice versa.

Unfortunately, a lot of back ground information could possibly spoil the plots of the other parts of the series.
That's about the best info I can give without starting to sound like I'm trying to convert you or spoil key plot points. Sorry :(

Robert E. Howard's Conan saga would probably be my favourite. Conan is quite possibly my favourite fantasy character (alongside Geralt of Rivia) and the grand collection of short stories he is featured in are all very enjoyable and well written. Haven't read the full-length novel yet, but I will in time.

I've recently started exploring other Howard creations, such as Kull (which is more or less the original version of Conan), Solomon Kane and some of his less known material that are included in several compilations. A very good author and my biggest influence to my own aspirations for writing.

The Kingkiller Chronicle by Patrick Rothfuss who is amazing person and you should totally visit his blog right now.

I'd say Lord of the Rings because of the sheer volume of stuff I read about it (The Hobbit, the trilogy, The Silmarillion, etc.) despite the fact that I don't like sword 'n magic fantasy book serieses very much (or maybe I don't like them precisely because there's nowhere to go after Tolkien? They all seem to be milking the same cosmic literary cow). I suspect this is an obvious answer so I'm gonna go ahead with the more mysterious/pretentious possibility and say Salinger's Glass family series is easily my favorite (Nine Stories, Franny & Zooey, Raise High the Roof-Beam Carpenters), and I wish there was more about them.

MiskWisk:
Right, just a quick forum thread. What is your favourite book series?

Mine would be the Dragonriders of Pern series, a book series that began in 1967 written by Anne McCaffrey. I'm just going to say it immediately got points from me because it said dragonriders not dragonslayers which I dislike a lot.

Anyway, looking forward to the comments, just hoping it isn't all game of thrones.

i second dragonriders of pern, the world and character are intresting and well developed. The witcher series by Andrzej Sapkowski are great and the book of the new sun by Gene Wolfy is also really good in a very pulp science fiction way.

Robin Hobb's Farseer, Liveship and Tawny Man trilogies. (They actually form one long-reaching series). I heard she wrote another trilogy (or more...?) which I'm very interested in reading.

The Obernewtyn series by Isobelle Carmody, which has taken a frustratingly long time to wrap up. We're just waiting on the last installment, apparently, but it's taken bloody years to get there.

In no order:

The Middle Earth continuity (The Hobbit, Lord of the Rings, Silmarillian, Children of Hurin)by J.R.R. Tolkein

A Song of Ice and Fire by George R.R. Martin

Dresden Files by Jim Butcher

Codex Alera also by Jim Butcher

The Wheel of Time by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson

First Law by Joe Abercrombie

A Song of Ice and Fire
The Lord of the Rings
Hitchhiker's Trilogy

I think I like A Song of Ice and Fire the best out of them. I didn't like the 4th book as much as the others because it didn't feature 3 of my 5 favourite main characters but I still liked it a lot. Cersei's chapters were significantly more entertaining than I had originally thought they would be. Also, Jamie has swiftly become one of my favourite characters which after the first book, I never would have thought possible.

I'm liking A Dance of Dragons more though because Tyrion, Jon and Daenerys are in it.

MiskWisk:
Right, just a quick forum thread. What is your favourite book series?

Mine would be the Dragonriders of Pern series, a book series that began in 1967 written by Anne McCaffrey. I'm just going to say it immediately got points from me because it said dragonriders not dragonslayers which I dislike a lot.

Anyway, looking forward to the comments, just hoping it isn't all game of thrones.

Oh wow, I remember the Dragonriders books. There was a short story from the setting in my english textbook back in, oh gosh, middle-school I think. So I went out and read a couple afterwards. Kinda fell off after that though. It's a neat setting, but I just don't guess it was for me.

As for series I enjoy...

My favorite at the moment would be the Honor Harrington series by David Weber. A long-running sci-fi series dealing with naval conflicts, space-politics, and all the people caught up in the middle. Also there are telepathic six-legged cats :D The universe itself is actually pretty deep and interesting, and has spawned a couple spin-off series from the main plot, and five anthologies of short stories set within the setting. It's also a bit more realistic than other sci-fi settings, like star wars, or star trek. Ships lob missiles at each other from millions of kilometers away, and lasers are considered close-range weapons, only suitable for knife-fights at a light-second or two (400,000-800,000km). The politics, factions and characters are great too.

Also, the publisher, Baen books is awesome. The first two books in the series are available for free, in their entirety online. You can read them in your browser, or download them in various formats, both for PC's and book-readers.

http://www.baenebooks.com/p-304-on-basilisk-station.aspx There's the first book in the series. "On Basilisk Station"

I have also enjoyed Game of Thrones as well. It was a nice change to get back into fantasy after reading almost exclusively sci-fi for as long as I had.

The Dark Tower series, by Stephen King was a fun read, a few years back. It is pretty insane though, and I can understand why some people don't enjoy it, or King's work in general.

And since we're talking about series. I have to mention my first. The Animorphs series by K.A. Applegate. That was my first real exposure to a long-running, continuous book series. The cool thing is, the characters actually kind of grew up as the series went along, and the conflict got darker, and more violent as the stakes rose. It felt like a pretty good progression. Also, it's a series about kids using alien shape-shifting technology to transform into Earth's most dangerous animals, to wage a guerrilla war (occasionally with actual gorillas) against mind-controlling slugs from outer-space who are trying to slowly infiltrate and take over the Earth. How isn't that awesome? :D

I think it was part of what got me into sci-fi when I was younger as well.

SonOfMethuselah:

I'm also a huge fan of Stephen King's The Dark Tower series, which I've read through to completion (seven books) about four times.

Eight books now my fellow Gunslinger.

+1 to The Dark Tower and Discworld here.
I also love the Drenai series by David Gemmell, The Belgariad/The Mallorean by David Eddings, The Sharpe Series by Bernard Cornwall and the Eagle series by Simon Scarrow.

Hrm. Toss-up between the Dresden Files and whatever that ever-growing konga line of drizz't books is called now.

Blunderboy:

Eight books now my fellow Gunslinger.

+1 to The Dark Tower and Discworld here.

Ohhhh, yes, The Wind Through the Keyhole or something similar, isn't it? I'll admit to having not read that one, yet. At the time it came out, I had a huge backlog of books and games to get through. Now that it's almost a year old, though, it really is something I should be jumping on.

I'm a huge Night Angel fan. Brent Weeks is easily my favorite author.

Harry Potter
Discworld, from what I've read, another series to add to my list
A Song of Ice and Fire, still need to read the 5th book, but love this series, so good.

Hoping to be able to add Iain M Banks' Culture series to this list, currently reading the first in the series, Consider Phlebas, and I'm really enjoying it, just about near the end and am debating if I should jump straight to the second one, or start the Wheel of Time series or one of the other books I have on my Kindle.

The problem with Topics like this is I see all these books that sound great and probably are, so I look them up and think, yeah I'll get that but I never have the time to read them all, even worse now with the Kindle, 'cos all these books I buy don't take up real world space but do take my real world money. First world problems eh.

The Pendragon series is probably my favorite. I've re-read those books so many times half of them are falling apart. Definite recommendation.

Also, obligatory Song of Ice and Fire nod.

And as a kid I also enjoyed the Alex Rider spy novels. Gotta love those gadgets.

Horatio Hornblower series by Forrester (Napoleon times, follows british naval officer from midshipman (think a cadet) to an admiral)

Legacy of Aldenata is pretty darn epic (Sci-Fi)

Sector General by James White is awesome (a space hospital)

Metro 2033, though most of them are in Russian, many books.

Ziame:
Horatio Hornblower series by Forrester (Napoleon times, follows british naval officer from midshipman (think a cadet) to an admiral)

Legacy of Aldenata is pretty darn epic (Sci-Fi)

Sector General by James White is awesome (a space hospital)

Metro 2033, though most of them are in Russian, many books.

I really need to read Horatio Hornblower, now that I think of it. Are you familiar with the Honor Harrington series by David Weber? It's been described, by the author himself at times, as 'Horatio Hornblower in space'. Lots of space-politics, naval conflicts and interesting characters as you follow Honor Harrington up through the ranks (I believe she was a Commander in the first book. But short stories show her at lower ranks). The naval combat itself is a lot more interesting than the WWII in space, visual-range laser-fights you see a lot in star wars, star trek and the like too.

Rascarin:
Robin Hobb's Farseer, Liveship and Tawny Man trilogies. (They actually form one long-reaching series). I heard she wrote another trilogy (or more...?) which I'm very interested in reading.

The Rain Wild Chronicles. It's currently three books, with a fourth coming. I'll put a short summary in spoilers, since it requires knowledge of events from the other books.

Waylander series and the Rigante series by David Gemmell are two of my all time favourites it was my first foray into fantasy of any kind and they exploded my young brain.

BrassButtons:

Rascarin:
Robin Hobb's Farseer, Liveship and Tawny Man trilogies. (They actually form one long-reaching series). I heard she wrote another trilogy (or more...?) which I'm very interested in reading.

The Rain Wild Chronicles. It's currently three books, with a fourth coming. I'll put a short summary in spoilers, since it requires knowledge of events from the other books.

Ah, Malta. I remember wanting to wring her neck at first, then thinking she was brilliant by the end of the Liveships. Hobb did an amazing job with her character development.

Another favourite is the whole Amber/Fool thing. I only wish I'd read Liveships before the Tawny Man series so it could have been an even better surprise...

I'll definitely have to save up some money so I can get the Rain Wild chronicles.

Science Fiction:
The Mars Trilogy (Red Mars, Blue Mars, Green Mars); by Kim Stanley Robinson

Fantasy:
The Empire Trilogy (Daughter/Servant/Mistress of the Empire); by Janny Wurts & Raymond E Feist

For Shits And Giggles:
The Sorcery! Epic (The Shamutanti Hills, Khare:Cityport of Traps, The Seven Serpents, The Crown of Kings), by Steve Jackson

OK, the Sorcery! Epic is a gamebook series but by Thor's thunderous bottom burps I wouldn't have gotten interested in fantasy - or possibly even fiction at all. It all goes back to those first tentative steps into the Shamutanti Hills, through a bizarre forested world full of magic and monsters and until a climactic battle against a Manticore no less. Now that shit was AWESOME. And the sense of accomplishment when you finished all 4 books and stood over the corpse of the Archmage and sheathed your sword for the final time was worth every dictionary check (c'mon .. I read them when I was about 5 - do you really expect the average 5 yr old to know what 'craven', 'blasphemous' or 'insipid' mean?).

Well, the first choice absolutely must be Discworld. Such a wonderful mix of comedy and drama I have rarely seen, and it's all based off of human behavior. Apart from that... I do enjoy the Dresden Files and [i[Codex Alera[/i] series greatly. The Young Wizards series is also quite good and doesn't get nearly enough love in my opinion.

Also, not really a series, but anything written by the author Chris Wooding. Partly it's nostalgia, because I read his works from a very young age, but mostly it's because I'm a sucker for stories with good settings, and he can write fascinating settings for his stories.

Rather cliché by now, but A Song Of Ice and Fire I love, really can't wait for the next book to come out.

Harry Potter, probably the first full, overarching story series I actually read, I think.

Non-fiction, but I have a metric fuckton (fuck-ton? fucktonne? fuck-tonne?) of the Horrible Histories books, educating and funny as hell, especially for a kid. The tv series on BBC is brilliant as well.

The Hyperion Cantos is awesome as well, some really quite fucked up stuff happens, particularly in the first book.

Starting to really get into Trudi Canavan's stuff as well, particularly Age of the Five.

On a video game related note, I love Karen Travis' books, particularly the Gears of War books and her Kilo-5 series of Halo books (Glasslands and The Thursday War with another to come hopefully!).

Got Kim Stanley Robinson's The Mars Trilogy and the Foundation series sat on my bookshelf next to each other, both begging for me to read them.

And after reading this thread, I really want to read some of these series as well, "DAMN YOU INTERNET!"

Discworld is my favourite, followed closely by Anno Dracula by Kim Newman (basically, Dracula wins in the events of the book Dracula, goes on to marry Queen Victoria, and a few years later a good chunk of the population of England is made up of vampires. And then some nut, named Jack the Ripper by the press, starts murdering vampire prostitutes in Whitechapel).

I do remember the Dragonriders of Pern books pretty fondly. I think I've read... nearly all of them, barring some of the more recent Todd McCaffrey ones which all really blur together in my head. Very interesting series, most of the stories come off more as a political drama plus dragons than anything else.

I do find it rather strange that so very many people like ASOIAF so much though. The series always came off like a poor man's Wheel of Time to me, only set in a standard fantasy setting instead of... whatever it is the Wheel of Time is set in.

rcs619:
Also, the publisher, Baen books is awesome. The first two books in the series are available for free, in their entirety online. You can read them in your browser, or download them in various formats, both for PC's and book-readers.

Pffft... The recent more hardbacks from the series also ship with CD containing ebook versions of every David Weber novel baen has published a the time of publishing AND come with permission from baen to freely distribute the files.

Baen do that with a few of their writers.

I like anything by Eric Nylund.
On a side note, I'm also a writer; give Divine Avenger a shot, yes? :D

 Pages PREV 1 2 3 4 NEXT

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked