Harry Potter: What do you think would have happened if he'd been in another House?

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It's just one of those things that I was wondering recently.

Let's say for example that he simply wasn't put in Gryffindor, in the second year he wouldn't have been able to get Gryffindors sword from the hat, and most likely wouldn't have been able to defeat the Basilisk.

Or even earlier, Ginny would have never been able to steal the diary back and wouldn't have been captured.

In the third book Sirius Black would have went into the Gryffindor common room, despite Harry not being there, so that'd cause a few changes.

If he was put in Slytherin then would he be mistrusted by the other students, especially in the second year (although he'd never have duelled Malfoy and so nobody else would know he could speak to snakes)?

So what do you think would have changed significantly? Even more so if he went into Slytherin?

Note:

I am very well aware that the books were written with the intention of him being in Gryffindor, there is no need to point that out, as a lot of things more or less rely on this fact. This is just for discussing different directions people think the series might have taken.

One thing I'd like to avoid if possible is the fact that Hermione is pretty much the person who figures everything out, let's assume for the sake of discussion that Harry is capable of thinking as well.

He'd have become best bros with the pimp-who-must-not-be-named and launched a righteous pure blooded crusade over the wizarding world.

Would have been interesting.

Hmm, I'm more interested in what might have happened if Harry had ended up in a different house than the Dudley's.

On that note, I know muggles are useless and boring, but surely social services would've reacted at some point to Harry's troubles? I mean, if I were the Dudley's next door neighbour, I'd have called the social services right away if I knew one of their kids had to live in a cupboard under the flippin' stairs. Or at the very least when they renovated one of their bedrooms into a prison cell.

Dumbledore, you senile old sod, you might as well have left the baby balancing over the shark tanks at the aquarium. :P

It would have just been Neville Longbottom and the Philosopher's Stone then, wouldn't it?

Didn't she kind of set it up that it could have been one or the other?

If he'd been in Hufflepuff, then he wouldn't matter. Because no one in Hufflepuff matters. They're the leftover house.

Colour-Scientist:
It would have just been Neville Longbottom and the Philosopher's Stone then, wouldn't it?

Didn't she kind of set it up that it could have been one or the other?

Well, Voldemort could have gone after Neville instead of Harry first, not quite the same thing.

...

The problem with Harry not going to Gryffindor is that Harry is a hero, and Gryffindor is the house for heroes. He doesn't really work anywhere else, unless he turns out not to be a hero.

In the last book, Dumbledore recognises that Snape is a good and brave man, and a member of Slytherin. He doesn't say that Slytherins can be good and brave just like everyone else, he says that "sometimes we sort too soon", that because Sanpe is a good and brave man, he should be a Gryffindor.

For Harry not to be in the house of the heroes, he either has to not be a hero or the sorting hat makes a mistake again.

Personally, I'd like to have seen Hermione as the hero/ine. Harry is just born a hero, born rich due to his inheritance, born naturally good at flying, gets extra special magic from Voldemort when he's a baby, even more rich due to another inheritance etc.

Hermione had to work for everything she's gotten (well, besides being clever and determined), and has to help the other heroes who just sort of muddle along.

Colour-Scientist:
It would have just been Neville Longbottom and the Philosopher's Stone then, wouldn't it?

Didn't she kind of set it up that it could have been one or the other?

No, because the prophecy came about due to Voldermort killing trying to kill Harry over Neville (it could have been either). That has no relevance to what house Harry ended up being in.

The prophecy would still exist.
He'd still have motive due to his parents being killed.

Muspelheim:

On that note, I know muggles are useless and boring, but surely social services would've reacted at some point to Harry's troubles? I mean, if I were the Dudley's next door neighbour, I'd have called the social services right away if I knew one of their kids had to live in a cupboard under the flippin' stairs. Or at the very least when they renovated one of their bedrooms into a prison cell.

They wouldn't know that he did. Social services don't really have cause to visit unless they have knowledge of a child being mistreated, to the outside world the Dursleys act like a model family. It's why they try and keep Harry out of sight, so nobody suspects that they aren't. There is no way they'd let neighbours know about him being in the cupboard, that's why they were so shocked that the letters mentioned it in the first one.

thaluikhain:

The problem with Harry not going to Gryffindor is that Harry is a hero, and Gryffindor is the house for heroes. He doesn't really work anywhere else, unless he turns out not to be a hero.

In the last book, Dumbledore recognises that Snape is a good and brave man, and a member of Slytherin. He doesn't say that Slytherins can be good and brave just like everyone else, he says that "sometimes we sort too soon", that because Snape is a good and brave man, he should be a Gryffindor.

For Harry not to be in the house of the heroes, he either has to not be a hero or the sorting hat makes a mistake again.

Eh, kinda.

It's more a case of Slytherin being for the ambitious and Gryffindor being for those willing to put others ahead of themselves. Snape shows that he is willing to sacrifice a lot for the greater good, whereas a Slytherin would be more likely to aim for personal gain. It's not so much good and bad, as it is selflessness and selfishness.

As for the "hero house", that's how the books come across, but it's not really the "idea" behind it. They each have their own virtue, but as the hero of the book is in Gryffindor it focuses on them as the heroes.

I am asking for people to use their imaginations, not think of reasons for why it wouldn't work.

Legion:
Eh, kinda.

It's more a case of Slytherin being for the ambitious and Gryffindor being for those willing to put others ahead of themselves. Snape shows that he is willing to sacrifice a lot for the greater good, whereas a Slytherin would be more likely to aim for personal gain. It's not so much good and bad, as it is selflessness and selfishness.

As for the "hero house", that's how the books come across, but it's not really the "idea" behind it. They each have their own virtue, but as the hero of the book is in Gryffindor it focuses on them as the heroes.

I disagree there, I think it's fairly implicit in the books that, perhaps despite their intentions, Gryffindor are the heroes and Slytherin are the villains. Hagrid in the first book says all evil wizards were Slytherins, no Slytherin students fight against Voldemort in the final battle, but all the Gryffindors volunteered, etc.

I even read somewhere that Rowling gave people birthdays depending on what house they were in, because she felt some starsigns were more trustworthy than others.

Legion:
I am asking for people to use their imaginations, not think of reasons for why it wouldn't work.

I'm not saying it wouldn't work, just that I can only see two ways for it to happen, that the hat made a mistake (like Dumbledore said it did for Snape), or Harry isn't a hero. Now, you might disagree, but I'm proceeding from that premise.

Now, if Harry wasn't a hero, for the prophecy to work, Neville would have to have been the one Voldemort went after first. Well...unless Harry dies heroically, I guess, which would fit.

Anyway, assuming Neville is the chosen one, more or less swap him and Harry, I guess. His parents get murdered instead of tortured, though his grandmother is less disappointed with him cause he sorta kinda offed Voldemort. Neville grows up exactly as Dumbledore didn't want Harry to, knowing he was famous since he was one year old. But Neville could work more or less as well, I think.

Harry stops being in any way important. He might still be around as a bit player, but I'd say he'd be less relevant than Luna.

...

If Harry is still the hero, though, and was put in another house by mistake he still has to stop Voldemort from getting the Philosopher's Stone. Probably he doesn't work with Ron and Hermione, he gets friends from his own house. IMHO, it is vital he is friends with people in his new house. He needs support and help from his housemates, the only student that regularly helps in that way outside his house is Luna, late in the series, and she's one person compared to all his housemates. I'm proceeding with the assumption that he is friends with his housemates, because he needs that to be the hero. Yes, him being "the hero" distorts all sorts of things in weird ways, but that's how I'm interpreting the rules of the world to work. I suppose being in a certain house might "rub off"...Harry is always a hero, but tries to be cleverer in Ravenclaw, tries to be sneakier in Slytherin, tries to be mumble mumble mumble in Hufflepuff.

I've rambled on for ages, mostly about Slytherin, so I've broken it up.

Wouldn't having him being put into a different house pretty much mean his personality would of been different itself?

I mean he end up putting into Gryffindor (well as a second placed for resfusing to joined Slytherin) for being brave. For him to had end up joining the other hourses would mean he would of either had been smart, friendly or cunning (or had accept the sorting hat first choice).

That itself would of change drastically of what Harry would of done and how or what he think. Well for one thing he wouldn't had end up being friend with Hermione let alone if he still try to stay friend with Ron when he was place in Gryffindor .

Scarim Coral:
That itself would of change drastically of what Harry would of done and how or what he think. Well for one thing he wouldn't had end up being friend with Hermione let alone if he still try to stay friend with Ron when he was place in Gryffindor .

I dunno, Harry (and Ron) became friends with Hermione after saving her from a troll. Doesn't matter what house he was in for that. Possibly could have upset her in the first place as well.

He was being friendly with Ron on the train before they'd been sorted. Both being in Gryffindor helped, but might not have been essential.

Scarim Coral:
Wouldn't having him being put into a different house pretty much mean his personality would of been different itself?

I am trying to imagine a Harry Potter from Ravenclaw or Hufflepuff. In the end I think he would have been a very dull person.

Well from the Sorting Hat's comments he could have been in any house, but it was his aversion to Slytherin that pointed the hat in the direction of Gryffindor, most likely because of the on going feud between the two houses.

So how would it have played out?

Ravenclaw:
It's likely that instead of befriending Ron, Harry would have made friends with the boys of Ravenclaw, such as Anthony Goldstein, Terry Boot and Michael Corner. Also If I remember correctly Hermione had a choice between Ravenclaw and Gryffindor, but most likely chose Gryffindor because Dumbledore had been in the same house, and because that's that's where she expected Harry to go, as she was desperate for friends, so she may have ended up in Ravenclaw too, although she's sorted before Harry so she'd be relying on their interactions on the train, which would be different if Harry had a more pro-Ravenclaw personality.

As for Harry himself the general environment around him would encourage him to study more, so his grades would most likely be better, although it's a misconception that he's stupid or just average. He cast a corporal patrnous at thirteen, and in his O.W.L.S he received an O in Defense, as well as 5 E's, of which one was in Potions despite the fact Snape hated his guts and didn't offer him any help, so if he did actually receive tuition he may have actually got an O, not to mention it's ironic how much Harry learned from Snape via his potion's textbook, showing that Harry had the potential if only Snape would have helped him.

Which leads onto my next point, being in Ravenclaw it's possible Harry may have been treated differently by his professors and peers, and that he may have remained neutral instead of getting involved in the fight between Gryffindor and Slytherin, and that as a consequence he might have gotten on better with Malfoy, and been treated better by Snape. It may have also effected have he went about things; he's known for being a spur of the moment guy, and improvises a lot, so being a Ravenclaw he might have thought things through and acted differently, although we'd be here forever if we analyzed everything he did.

Slytherin:
I personally couldn't see it happening because the abuse at the Dursleys (being starved and locked in a cupboard is abuse, and the fact Uncle Vernon didn't mind slapping Dudley, makes me believe Harry was probably hit although JKR couldn't show it), made him want to be accepted and not stand out, hence when the Sorting Hat told him he could be great in Slytherin, he opted for Gryffindor where he sought to make friends.

But let's just say he did go there, well I could see things being cold between him and Draco, although Snape would most likely treat him a lot better; I'd bet he'd be shocked and have to rethink his position on Harry, and despite his hate for James I don't believe he'd openly go against his bias towards his Slytherins, so Harry would most likely do a lot better in potions, not only that but I could see the Slytherins warming up to him so long as he gave them a chance, perhaps convincing them to side with him and not the Death Eaters when Voldemort rolls around. Of course the rest of the school would be a lot more frosty towards him, and even more so when he's accused of being the Heir of Slytherin, although he may get Slytherin some prestige through the TriWizard Tournament. I also believe he'd be a lot more sneaky about how he acts, and would probably learn Pureblood customs too.

Hufflepuff:
I think this would probably be the best house for Harry to have gone too, and I find the prejudice against Hufflepuffs to be ridiculous; what's so wrong with being hard working, sociable and loyal? Aren't those qualities you'd look for in a friend? So yeah I think Harry would be inundated with friends, and that as a consequence he wouldn't feel so isolated when part's of the school turn against him, and can you imagine Hufflepuff having two champions in the TriWizard Tournament? The Puffs would have been going crazy. As for negatives I could see parts of the school thinking less of him because of his house, which is sad but true.

Head of House:
Regardless of which house Harry went to I could see Filius Flitwick, Severus Snape, and Pomona Spout all being better Heads of Houses' than Minerva McGonagall.

Her failings are many:
1. Instead of punishing Harry as she rightfully should (Madam Hooch had said anyone caught flying would be expelled faster than they could say Quidditch), she instead rewarded him by showing blatant favoritism by allowing him onto the Gryffindor Quiddtich team, oh and got him a Nimbus 2000, although it's debatable whether she bought it or the money came out of Harry's vault.

2. Inconsistency - when Harry, Hermione, Neville, and Draco were caught out of bed she docked twenty points off Slytherin and awarded Draco a detention, whereas for her three Gryffindors she docked fifty points each, or one hundred and fifty combined, and then to make matters worse their detention was held in the FORBIDDEN FOREST, yes four first years in a place that is forbidden and at midnight too, with the only adult there unable to do magic, and they knew something dangerous was there because unicorns were dying, Hagrid said so himself. Are they stupid? But you know what's even more aggravating? The fact that McGonagall only gave Harry and Ron detention in 2nd year, you know when they stole a car, broke the Statue of Secrecy, and damaged the Whomping Willow, maybe if she'd of reversed the punishments for the offenses she'd have been right, but because she didn't it doesn't make any sense.

3. She did nothing when three of her own students confided in her about the Philosopher's stone, yes it was shocking and perhaps it could have been put down to childish imagination, but regardless she should have just humored the kids and checked anyway, and if there's nothing wrong no harm done, but if there is something wrong well then they can do something about it, you don't just blatantly ignore the issue. Is it any surprise Harry dealt with things on his own when the adults around him didn't listen to him when he asked for help?

4. She was the direct cause of Ron, Hermione and Harry being treated as outcasts in first year due to the point deduction, and did nothing about it, just as she didn't help Harry when he was being slandered by the entire school in second year, or again when the same occurred in fourth year through the tournament, and surprise, surprise, no help again when he's being accused of lunacy in fifth year too. In fact the only time she actually did anything remotely worthwhile was in his career meeting, when she promised to help him become an Auror, yet I suspect it was more to do with putting Umbridge in her place, than actually helping Harry, and no surprises because in sixth year she didn't make good on her promise.

I could probably go on but this post has already gotten too long.

If he wasn't in Gryffindor, and didn't become friends with Ron so much - would he have been rescued from his temporary prison near the beginning of the second book? Who else would have been able to and willing to do it, provided they knew? And what would've happened then?

Come to think of it, I always wondered what the Dursleys would do when someone reported to social services bars on a bedroom window on the FRONT of the house (as if no-one will notice). Was that seriously their long-term plan?

I think Hufflepuff would have been an almost identical case to Gryffindor. People might expect a little less of Harry and he would have been enormously popular in his house. He would still have been friends with Ron (they shared some classes with the Huffers) but would he have become friends with Hermione? They wouldn't have shared broomstick lessons together, so no detention and Neville and Hermione wouldn't have been there with them when they find Fluffy (unless Ron brought them or Harry was accompanying Ron).

And he would have probably become much bigger friends with Cedric Diggory (and Hufflepuff would have won everything Quidditch =D). Diggory would be a good friend and adventure with him well.

Ravenclaw would be a bit different because the key virtue is intelligence, whereas Hufflepuff in being good natured also attracted a similar type of brave on others behalf. He would have probably done something sneakier to the Basilisk than drawing a sword and stabbing.

Slytherine is the hardest, he could have still been good and Slytherine, but he would have been more ambitious which would be good for his education, but it's easy to see him being drawn into the dark side. I think Malfoy would have still hated him, because Harry wouldn't ever be a lacky and they would have ended up butting heads in the same way

thaluikhain:

Legion:
Eh, kinda.

It's more a case of Slytherin being for the ambitious and Gryffindor being for those willing to put others ahead of themselves. Snape shows that he is willing to sacrifice a lot for the greater good, whereas a Slytherin would be more likely to aim for personal gain. It's not so much good and bad, as it is selflessness and selfishness.

As for the "hero house", that's how the books come across, but it's not really the "idea" behind it. They each have their own virtue, but as the hero of the book is in Gryffindor it focuses on them as the heroes.

I disagree there, I think it's fairly implicit in the books that, perhaps despite their intentions, Gryffindor are the heroes and Slytherin are the villains. Hagrid in the first book says all evil wizards were Slytherins, no Slytherin students fight against Voldemort in the final battle, but all the Gryffindors volunteered, etc.

That's actually non-canon believe it or not =D According to Rowling a good portion of Slytherine sneaked in to join the fight to help save Hogwarts and she just didn't end up putting it in the books.

I think it's rightly implied that Salazar was a pretty bad dude and his morals attracted a lot of bad dudes, but also that you can get good people too and the implication that they sort too early is that anyone has a chance to be good. So it's not just that Snape was sorted in the wrong house, but anyone, Malfoy, Slughorn etc have the power to be good in them too. If people can turn out to be different in later life then it makes the whole idea of stereotyping houses pointless, rather than inefficient. In general the books start off black and white and end up grey, so I think that fits in with the idea that Slytherine aren't evil at all.

Think of RA Black as well, that was another hero who belonged to Slytherine.

thaluikhain:

Colour-Scientist:
It would have just been Neville Longbottom and the Philosopher's Stone then, wouldn't it?

Didn't she kind of set it up that it could have been one or the other?

Well, Voldemort could have gone after Neville instead of Harry first, not quite the same thing.

...

The problem with Harry not going to Gryffindor is that Harry is a hero, and Gryffindor is the house for heroes. He doesn't really work anywhere else, unless he turns out not to be a hero.

In the last book, Dumbledore recognises that Snape is a good and brave man, and a member of Slytherin. He doesn't say that Slytherins can be good and brave just like everyone else, he says that "sometimes we sort too soon", that because Sanpe is a good and brave man, he should be a Gryffindor.

For Harry not to be in the house of the heroes, he either has to not be a hero or the sorting hat makes a mistake again.

Personally, I'd like to have seen Hermione as the hero/ine. Harry is just born a hero, born rich due to his inheritance, born naturally good at flying, gets extra special magic from Voldemort when he's a baby, even more rich due to another inheritance etc.

Hermione had to work for everything she's gotten (well, besides being clever and determined), and has to help the other heroes who just sort of muddle along.

I'll agree that Hermione would've been greet as the lead Heroine in the HP franchise, but then there would be a huge "Goku" complex, meaning that Hermione, on top of being clever, determined, and gifted with magic, would always have to come to save the day regardless of what anyone one else does.

Hermione has a great role of being the smart and competent with magic one, Ron is goofy, lighthearted one who tends to nullify any amount of tension in a room, allowing the other heroes to complete their roles effectively, and Harry is the resourceful, gifted one that saves everyone and rallies the troops, despite being outclassed by some of his fellow wizards.

Muspelheim:
Hmm, I'm more interested in what might have happened if Harry had ended up in a different house than the Dudley's.

On that note, I know muggles are useless and boring, but surely social services would've reacted at some point to Harry's troubles? I mean, if I were the Dudley's next door neighbour, I'd have called the social services right away if I knew one of their kids had to live in a cupboard under the flippin' stairs. Or at the very least when they renovated one of their bedrooms into a prison cell.

Dumbledore, you senile old sod, you might as well have left the baby balancing over the shark tanks at the aquarium. :P

My thoughts on the subject were pretty similar to this. One of the reasons I delayed starting to readthe books (and I've
never watched the movies) was that while I can suspend my disbelief enough to take in wizards hidden all over the world,
magical creatures all over the place hidden by the wizards etc.... it just boggled my mind that
1)The Dursleys were such a bunch of arseholes that they treated their nephew/cousin like that
2)Why in the ^#** no-one ever called social services! The kids & teachers at his school had to have noticed that he
was wearing castoff clothes way too big for him when he came from an upper-middle class family! If I were one of
his teachers my first thought would have probably been "Oh my god, I bet those are to hide bruises!".

And seriously--Harry's parents were supposed to be so well loved, Harry himself deeply appreciated and *nobobdy*
from the wizarding community ever thought to check up on him? Arabella Figg, supposedly put in to the neighborhood
to keep an eye on him *never* told any decent wizards about his circumstances? Or if she did, nobody did anything
about it?

My apologies, I got kind of rant-tastic there.....

My big "What If" for the HP series has often been "What if the Dursley's hadn't been a bunch of arseholes, and
treated Harry like an actual family member?"

thaluikhain:

Personally, I'd like to have seen Hermione as the hero/ine. Harry is just born a hero, born rich due to his inheritance, born naturally good at flying, gets extra special magic from Voldemort when he's a baby, even more rich due to another inheritance etc.

Hermione had to work for everything she's gotten (well, besides being clever and determined), and has to help the other heroes who just sort of muddle along.

you just blew my mind 0_0..........similar to when I leanred what squibs are the charachter finch made alot more sense

in the very first book doesnt the sorting hat suggest slytherin for harry?..like it makes sense? (which it really doesnt)if harry had been in slytherine (or even the others) would he have been unable to be freinds with ron/herminone? I know its not a rule but it seems to be an unwritten one

Legion:
Let's say for example that he simply wasn't put in Gryffindor, in the second year he wouldn't have been able to get Gryffindors sword from the hat, and most likely wouldn't have been able to defeat the Basilisk.

Didn't the sword materialise for him because he was showing loyalty to dumbledore (and bravery against tom riddle by speaking so highly of dumbledore)?
So, even if he wasn't actually from gryffindor himself, it could still have appeared for him I think (unless it actually said somewhere that he had to be in griffindor house to get it. I don't remember that ever being stated, but i'm not by any means all that invested in Harry potter, beyond reading two or three of the books and watching the movies).

Some_weirdGuy:

Legion:
Let's say for example that he simply wasn't put in Gryffindor, in the second year he wouldn't have been able to get Gryffindors sword from the hat, and most likely wouldn't have been able to defeat the Basilisk.

Didn't the sword materialise for him because he was showing loyalty to dumbledore (and bravery against tom riddle by speaking so highly of dumbledore)?
So, even if he wasn't actually from gryffindor himself, it could still have appeared for him I think (unless it actually said somewhere that he had to be in griffindor house to get it. I don't remember that ever being stated, but i'm not by any means all that invested in Harry potter, beyond reading two or three of the books and watching the movies).

It did mention he had to be in Gryffindor, yes.

Fawkes (the phoenix) came to him for showing loyalty to Dumbledore, but the only reason he could withdraw the sword from the sorting hat was because he was a "true Gryffindor". Although I suppose another weapon or tool could logically be given, should he have been in another house. Of course, it wouldn't have the same affect as the sword though, seeing as it absorbed venom from the Basilisk, therefore giving him a means to easily destroy Horcruxes.

Vault101:

in the very first book doesnt the sorting hat suggest slytherin for harry?..like it makes sense? (which it really doesnt)if harry had been in slytherine (or even the others) would he have been unable to be freinds with ron/herminone? I know its not a rule but it seems to be an unwritten one

It mentions that he could "do well in Slytherin" as he has a "thirst for power" and then it says "No? If you are sure...". Slytherin is (supposed to be) the house for the ambitious and those who desire strength. While it doesn't make much sense in how the books are written (as all the pricks are in that house), there is no reason why Harry couldn't be in the house based upon the ideal of what the house stands for. If it were just a school for the kind of person who is likely to become a criminal then it'd just be useful as a means for deciding who not to teach magic really. That's why before I suggested people not look at it with how Rowling wrote it, but rather look at the lore itself.

Personally I don't think he'd be friends with Hermione if he were in any of the other houses. Simply because he only became friends with her two months of being in the same house, and that was when Ron upset her and she ran off. Only from realising she was missing and going to save her from the troll did they actually become friends. There's no (obvious) situation in which they'd be friends if Harry were in another house.

With this topic I am not really asking how Rowling would have written the story if she'd changed the house. I am looking for people to imagine their own ideas based upon the world itself. So as long as it's plausible, I think it's worth discussing, even if it goes against some of the themes of the books themselves.

Little Woodsman:

My big "What If" for the HP series has often been "What if the Dursley's hadn't been a bunch of arseholes, and
treated Harry like an actual family member?"

To be honest, I don't think much would have changed.

When it comes down to it, Harry spent the first 11 years of his like with a family who both disliked and feared him, he had no friends and nobody to confide in or support him. Realistically he'd not be quite so well adjusted socially as he is in the series, as he is quite trusting, very friendly, and fits in with the school as well as the average teenager would.

Although of course this is due to the type of book Rowling was writing. The idea of a student with neurological and trust issues is not really the theme she was going for.

So considering that Harry is a decent and well adjusted person when it comes down to it, despite years of neglect, I don't see him coming from a kind family changing that much. His summers would be more pleasant, but beyond that I don't really see what it'd affect.

He might not have been so douchey and self-righteous.

Legion:

Let's say for example that he simply wasn't put in Gryffindor, in the second year he wouldn't have been able to get Gryffindors sword from the hat, and most likely wouldn't have been able to defeat the Basilisk.

Which might have been moot had he not had such an aversion to people like Snape.

Or even earlier, Ginny would have never been able to steal the diary back and wouldn't have been captured.

Of course, Tom Riddle might go looking for another target.

In the third book Sirius Black would have went into the Gryffindor common room, despite Harry not being there, so that'd cause a few changes.

Crookshanks was in cahoots with Sirius. It's quite possible that Crookshanks could have gotten passwords to one of the other common rooms, especially since people tend to pay no mind to the devilish little hairball.

If he was put in Slytherin then would he be mistrusted by the other students, especially in the second year (although he'd never have duelled Malfoy and so nobody else would know he could speak to snakes)?

Well, he was STILL the "boy who lived," even if he was a Slytherin.

So what do you think would have changed significantly? Even more so if he went into Slytherin?

One thing I'd like to avoid if possible is the fact that Hermione is pretty much the person who figures everything out, let's assume for the sake of discussion that Harry is capable of thinking as well.

What if they were still friends?

Things would clearly be more difficult, as they would no longer share the same houses, necessarily the same classes, etc. But they could still be friends. Or, if Potter turned evil because plot contrivance, he could always manipulate her. He seemed good at getting people to do what he wanted, anyway.

Some_weirdGuy:

Didn't the sword materialise for him because he was showing loyalty to dumbledore (and bravery against tom riddle by speaking so highly of dumbledore)?

And because he was a "true Gryffyndor."

Legion:

When it comes down to it, Harry spent the first 11 years of his like with a family who both disliked and feared him, he had no friends and nobody to confide in or support him. Realistically he'd not be quite so well adjusted socially as he is in the series, as he is quite trusting, very friendly, and fits in with the school as well as the average teenager would.

Although of course this is due to the type of book Rowling was writing. The idea of a student with neurological and trust issues is not really the theme she was going for.

Some of what you said there is stuff that's always bugged me about the series.

Harry has some affinity for Hagrid, which is understandable, but he then latches onto Dumbledore because of it, because ponies. He's told Slytherin House is evil, which he believes (because ponies) and asks not to be put in it because of basically a single line from someone. I know it's a children's series, but even children's books should have some sort of logic behind them. It's not so much that he's trusting, it's why he's trusting. He likes Ron because Ron sat with him on the train...Maybe enough for an affinity, but not a lifelong bond.

I agree, though, that if he could be well-adjusted with the Durselys being cartoonish supervillains, then he could be well-adjusted basically anywhere.

It's part of why this question is so interesting, though, to think about the ways that Harry went. Much of his path was decided by a series of whims. Sure, Draco was a dick and Snape was immediately out to make Harry look like a prat, but so many of the other choices were because ponies. And because it's practically required that he good guy house face the bad guy house. But you can do all these sorts of things and make sense.

And I know that the last couple of books can be taken as becoming disillusioned with one's childhood beliefs and growing to understand the world, but I don't think she thought that far ahead (nor do I think Harry truly does that).

Zachary Amaranth:

In the third book Sirius Black would have went into the Gryffindor common room, despite Harry not being there, so that'd cause a few changes.

Crookshanks was in cahoots with Sirius. It's quite possible that Crookshanks could have gotten passwords to one of the other common rooms, especially since people tend to pay no mind to the devilish little hairball.

Yes, but the only reason Sirius went into the dormatories was to get Wormtail, who would be in Gryffindor house, not whichever house Harry would be in. Of course, most people probably would chalk it up to the behavior of a madman, rather than look for any rational reason he would be trying to get into Gryffindor and not at Harry.

OP, this is a really interesting question, but it would bring so many changes to the overall story it is hard to start. Especially since it has been so long since I've read the books, the order of minor events is not clear in my head.

I guess the logical place would be Harry's first meeting with Malfoy before they go in to be sorted. I still feel Malfoy would rub Harry the wrong way, but maybe he figures there's bound to be dicks in every house and doesn't hold it against Slytherin. Therefore he accepts the hats initial suggestion and joins Slytherin. In Slytherin, I feel there are two types of personalities: those who want to rule and be powerful and in charge of everything, and those who want to be better than most, but don't mind a person above them. For instance, Malfoy was of the first type, Crabbe and Goyle the second. Due to being "the Boy Who Lived" I think a lot of Slytherins would suck up to Harry, and since it would be the first time ever that this had happened to him, it would likely go to his head. He'd still butt heads with Malfoy, as neither is the follower type, and Harry would still think of him as a prat, even as Harry slowly became one himself without realizing it.

Snape would likely still treat him poorly, but not as bad as the original storyline. I think he blames Harry for Lily's death, and that would overshadow any feelings for Harry that he could have. Harry could potentially make some friends in Slytherin, but I feel most would be sycophants just wanting to be close to someone so famous and popular. As such, I think having a bunch of people look up to him and tell him he's amazing and talented (you know, if someone's sucking up to you) would start making him think he was better than most, which would start making him the prat that Malfoy is, as I mentioned before.

With luck, there would be a couple of true friendships. However, even if he continued to visit Hagrid, without continuing a friendship with Ron, he would not have been able to help get rid of Norbert, and therefore would not have been given detention in the forest and so would not have met Bane, learned about something drinking unicorn blood, etc. Same thing with discovering Fluffy. (Here's where order starts getting mixed up in my head.)

Assuming he does learn of all these things however (him and other friends find Fluffy, gets detention while trying to help Hagrid out in a way other than smuggling Norbert to the roof of Hogwarts), he still wouldn't know about the Philosopher's/Sorcerer's Stone since Hermione is the one who found out about it and she would likely be killed since Harry is the one who remembers she's in the bathroom. Therefore Harry would not see that Snape was bitten and come to the conclusion that he's trying to get at something the dog is guarding.

Due to not being on Gryffindor, Harry would not be made a Quidditch Seeker, as the Slytherin team still had theirs, therefore he would not have his broom cursed during a game, which is something that made Harry further suspect Snape. At this point, Harry has no one to really be suspicious of and therefore, when Quirrel goes after the Stone, he is stopped by the Mirror or Erised as Dumbledore designed. Likely he is caught there by the other teachers later and it is discovered that Voldemort is not as dead as the wizarding world had believed.

So that's my thought on the first book. There's no way to sum up the rest of the series quickly, I'd have to do a book by book and with all the permutations involved (esp since Hermione is dead), there's a LOT of rewriting that would have to be done. Suffice to say, I don't think the stories would have been as exciting if Harry had gone to another house, although I will admit, there would likely be a lot of drama once Voldemort became more prevalent (if he does at all anyway) with Harry being in Slytherin.

He could've tripped, fell and broke his neck on the way up an unfamiliar set of stairs.

SimpleThunda':
He could've tripped, fell and broke his neck on the way up an unfamiliar set of stairs.

Worse yet, he could've been left a quadriplegic at Pomfrey's yearning for euthanasia. Or not. All due respect OT, but anything and everything that didn't happen could've happened.

Aris Khandr:
If he'd been in Hufflepuff, then he wouldn't matter. Because no one in Hufflepuff matters. They're the leftover house.


Plus Cedric Diggory was a Hufflepuff, and was co-Triwizard Tournament Champion for Hogwarts and he would've won even with Harry being helped along.

Colour-Scientist:
It would have just been Neville Longbottom and the Philosopher's Stone then, wouldn't it?

Didn't she kind of set it up that it could have been one or the other?

Oh god I don't believe I'm doing this but...

Voldemort made Harry into his Nemesis by attacking his parents in Godric's Hollow when he was a baby. The Prophecy stated that 'The one with the power to vanquish the Dark Lord approaches ... born to those who have thrice defied him, born as the seventh month dies ... and the Dark Lord will mark him as his equal There is no mention of Harry specifically. Nevil's parents were both Auras that had escaped Voldemort three times like Harry's parents did.

But never the less, no it wouldn't work with Neville, because Voldemort would not have given him the power to beat him. Like he did when he 'marked' Harry. Neville just lost his parents to Bellatrix so he never possessed the power to defeat him.

OT

If Harry was not in Gryffindor then he would not have become such good friends with Hermione and Ron, both of whom are directly or not so directly responsible for saving Harry's life/enabling him to beat Voldemort. So it would be a very short book.

COMaestro:

Zachary Amaranth:

In the third book Sirius Black would have went into the Gryffindor common room, despite Harry not being there, so that'd cause a few changes.

Crookshanks was in cahoots with Sirius. It's quite possible that Crookshanks could have gotten passwords to one of the other common rooms, especially since people tend to pay no mind to the devilish little hairball.

Yes, but the only reason Sirius went into the dormatories was to get Wormtail, who would be in Gryffindor house, not whichever house Harry would be in. Of course, most people probably would chalk it up to the behavior of a madman, rather than look for any rational reason he would be trying to get into Gryffindor and not at Harry.

That was my point, yes. Everybody assumed that he was trying to kill Harry, so to go into the wrong common room would be an interesting idea. Although your response did give me an idea of why.

As you said, people assume that he is mad, and as he is on the run it is not unrealistic to assume that he'd not be up to date with current events. It is entirely possible that he'd assume Harry would be in Gryffindor due to his family being in it, as well as him being the enemy of Voldermort.

Not the most plausible scenario, but if a perceived madman did it, it'd not be an unlikely theory.

COMaestro:

*snip*

All interesting points, and I can see what you mean. I think the problem lies mostly with the fact that Harry is surprisingly uninterested in the magical world for somebody raised in a world without it.

The only time he really seems to try and learn anything about it is when he needs to for one reason or another. Like the Patronus because of his strong reaction to Dementors, or most of the spells he learnt for the Tri-Wizard tournament. If he hadn't been forced into situations early on where he needed certain spells, he'd know very little.

The same goes with non-spell related things, he simply seems to know nothing about the world he lives in and shows no interest. Hermione is pretty much the magical encyclopaedia, even knowing more than Ron who was raised as a wizard.

I think that whenever I think about stuff like this, I tend to deviate away from how Harry was written, purely because I cannot see how he could show so little interest in the magical world around him. Although the reason is obvious: Rowling wanted to make a story about a normal child/teenager's life to a certain extent, as seen by the themes of procrastination, suddenly noticing an interest in the preferred sex, dealing with bullies etc.

x EvilErmine x:

OT

If Harry was not in Gryffindor then he would not have become such good friends with Hermione and Ron, both of whom are directly or not so directly responsible for saving Harry's life/enabling him to beat Voldemort. So it would be a very short book.

That's why I mentioned to assume that Harry is actually competent, heh. The amount of times Hermione alone saves the day it's kind of sad how much Harry gets praised over her.

That said, if he didn't rely on them, it is possible he'd become more independent and have to learn these things for himself.

If harry was in slytherin he would and be way more cunning He would become a chessmaster type of hero or villan Pulling this strings of everything

I imagine if he joined Ravenclaw, we would be seeing the adventures of a couple of mad (wizard) scientists attempting to save the world.

I approve, mad scientists are always a great idea.

The other house would be getting all the points, naturally. Huh, imagine that...50 POINTS FOR HUFFLEPUFF! that'd be rather fun to hear.

Well if he went to Slytherin I think we'd hear a lot more of this:

Then he would have been able to pull out the fork of truth which is the legendary weapon from hufflepuff or the magical glock used by ravenclaw that fires magic bullets.

Vault101:
in the very first book doesnt the sorting hat suggest slytherin for harry?..like it makes sense? (which it really doesnt)if harry had been in slytherine (or even the others) would he have been unable to be freinds with ron/herminone? I know its not a rule but it seems to be an unwritten one

He got friendly with Ron on the train before the sorting, they got friendly with Hermione after the business with the troll later on. Wouldn't have had to be Gryffindor for either of those.

COMaestro:
I still feel Malfoy would rub Harry the wrong way, but maybe he figures there's bound to be dicks in every house and doesn't hold it against Slytherin.

I don't see why Harry must dislike Draco. I mean, one of the reasons that Draco is presented as wrong is that he despises muggles, and the wizards that associate with him.

Given that almost every muggle Harry has ever met either hates him for something that's not his fault, or supports/tolerates those who do, that viewpoint might not sound so unreasonable to him.

x EvilErmine x:

Colour-Scientist:
It would have just been Neville Longbottom and the Philosopher's Stone then, wouldn't it?

Didn't she kind of set it up that it could have been one or the other?

Oh god I don't believe I'm doing this but...

Voldemort made Harry into his Nemesis by attacking his parents in Godric's Hollow when he was a baby. The Prophecy stated that 'The one with the power to vanquish the Dark Lord approaches ... born to those who have thrice defied him, born as the seventh month dies ... and the Dark Lord will mark him as his equal There is no mention of Harry specifically. Nevil's parents were both Auras that had escaped Voldemort three times like Harry's parents did.

But never the less, no it wouldn't work with Neville, because Voldemort would not have given him the power to beat him. Like he did when he 'marked' Harry. Neville just lost his parents to Bellatrix so he never possessed the power to defeat him.

Er...maybe not. Neville lost his parents to the Lestranges after Voldemort's downfall. If Voldemort had gone after the Longbottoms first, one or more of Neville's parents (or maybe grandparents for all we know) might have died trying to save him the way Lily did with Harry.

I'm not sure if I really approve of the quite fascist way of putting people together based on what an old hat had to say about their personality.

He'd have been diagnosed with Lupus. Oh wait, that's not what we're doing? My bad :p

OT; the story would be the same, except Griffindor would appear to be the douchebags. Actually it would be more interesting. Assuming he became friends with Malfoy, you could have a big divided loyalties will he/wont he betray Harry theme, and someone like Neville or Hermione would make a more interesting antagonist than Malfoy, because they could be arseholes to Harry, yet it also be apparent that they are kind of justified in it.

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