Scams you've encountered

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I love window viruses. Everytime I get that call, I ask them which window? Main one? Then I take the phone with me and get the paper towels and Lysol to clear the viruses off of the window.

If they ask me to login to windows I tell them that I don't want a log in any part of my home and don't want broken glass everywhere.

Asita:
snip

This also happened to me. Twice. Although the second time it was just plain funny that they called me 30 minutes after sending off my CV to them, and saying they read it the day before and was really impressed. First time alarm bells rung from a)poor office space (a bare room with some posters up) b) over zealous staff - the team meeting was just like a group of fans cheering on their fav team, not something you expect from door to door sales and it was just seemed an act) and c) some serious misspelling on the material they game me

However there are loads of 'marketing' companies that try to drag in people to do door to door sales through misleading advertising, lying about the opportunities , pyramid scheme-like pay structure. Clear signs of a false company website would be a poor website with little content on what they do and over-emphasis and blogs that do not use original content but borrow from other news sites.

I did an interview one time with some hilariously dubious insurance company just to get some interview experience. Their pitch was that you are given leads of people who want the insurance, you go to their house and show them a couple spreadsheets and they will immediately be swayed to buy the crap you sell, and with hard work, you will make $200,000 a year. In reality, you go to the house of poor steelworkers who were convinced to give out their information under false pretenses and who don't want your shitty product, and on top of that, you are paying for gas, your company cell phone, overnight stays, and all sorts of "mandatory" accreditation classes. Once you do that, you are then to give like 70% of what you have left to your boss for providing you with the "leads."

I didn't learn all this until after the interview, but I walked out of the video presentation after I was no longer able to count the violations of basic economic principles their business model violated on my fingers. But anyway, the moral is that the old adage is very true: If it sounds too good to be true...

The only proper one was the fake virus alerts, event log bullshit where they'd point out normal system errors as threats and remotely mine your computer for information whilst pretending to fix it - you know, Comantra. Thankfully I had the sense to look it up before they had me install anything on my computer.

Other than that, the regular spam emails (I replied to one of the Prince of Nigeria ones with "Well what a coincidence, I'm the King of Australia and I have a similar problem, maybe we can help each other out"), but one was actually creative in that the guy created the account with his name as "Yahoo!" "Alerts", so with the stupidity of displaying actual names instead of email addresses, it showed as coming from Yahoo! Alerts but when I scrolled over the bubble it was something else. The actual email was beyond stupid though, apparently they were RUNNING OUT OF NAMES FOR EMAILS so they asked for confirmation of account activity by requesting a reply with your password. But points for trying.

99% of the people in a pickup truck pulling into my driveway and trying to sell some meat/sandwiches saying that it's on sale because it's the last of the batch and they can't just let it go to waste. Same story EVERY SINGLE TIME.

I had a guy from India call me telling me that the "United States government" had "okayed" my loan and I just had to confirm my info to get me money. I mean come on at least say what department of the "United States government". I promptly started to sell him scammers insurance. I just needed to confirm some of his bank details and pin numbers. Prick hung up on me.

I have TWO final notifications that i was sued for 2500$ for trying to sell my runescape account
I feel like Captain Obvious for saying this,but who the fuck sends TWO final notifications!?

Gormech:
99% of the people in a pickup truck pulling into my driveway and trying to sell some meat/sandwiches saying that it's on sale because it's the last of the batch and they can't just let it go to waste. Same story EVERY SINGLE TIME.

Wh... WHAT?! Who goes door-to-door selling meat sandwiches, of all things!?

OT: I keep getting calls from this one company who keeps telling me I've won a contest. I've never sat through an entire call so I don't know what it is they want from me or want me to do. Googling their number confirmed to me it was a scam though.

It's pretty obvious seeing as how most contests will move on to the runner up or do another draw if the winner proves difficult to get a hold of or doesn't accept their prize. But with me they've been constantly calling for the last few months, so either I'm the only person who ever entered in this contest (oh yeah, did I mention I never entered one?) or, it's a scam.

tippy2k2:

I just came back the next day and told them my debit card was stolen and I needed a new account :)

Your dwebit card is not your account. they can block the old card, issue new one and your account remains the same. the ONLY connection debit card has to bank account is that it cna acess its funs via ATMs or whne you pay in shop. thats it. you dont carry your bank account in your purse, you merely carry a key to the box.

but thats beside the point, sucks to hear the manager was such an ass.

spartan231490:
snip

please dont bring this ignorance in here. we talk about scams here, not about gun lunacy.

emeraldrafael:
I wonder how many people said religion on here and how many will...

i read the whole thread, and actually only one or two people mentioned it. people seem to consider scams as something different.

WOW ! That fucking sucks ! Did you lose ALL your money when you sutdown your bank account or you can have it back if you create another bank acoount ?

<facepalm> i do hope your joking. do you honestly believe you will somehow loose money if you decide to shut down your account just because?

I know! God, I spent like an hour trying to do a Recovery Disk thing, after two days of devoting all my time to trying to fix the motherfucker. After the Recovery Disk, which was supposed to be an end-all fucking nuclear option, didn't work, I just decided to switch full time to the laptop I used to look up guides. It's a lot more powerful, so I wasn't really losing anything, and I had luckily already transferred most of my important things over. Turns out, I can even go on to the computer and grab files if I really need to, like I said it's only blocked if I'm connected to the internet. So that at least was lucky.

why not jsut move important files and formatting? that will get rid of anything. recovery disk is far from end-all option. its a first step mild-bandage option when fighting viruses.

FoolKiller:
I love window viruses. Everytime I get that call, I ask them which window? Main one? Then I take the phone with me and get the paper towels and Lysol to clear the viruses off of the window.

If they ask me to login to windows I tell them that I don't want a log in any part of my home and don't want broken glass everywhere.

thats actually awesome. id try to tell you you do need logs in your windows because they would tell you stories about twin peaks. and you wouln't even need a loglady to translate.

apparently they were RUNNING OUT OF NAMES FOR EMAILS so they asked for confirmation of account activity by requesting a reply with your password. But points for trying.

i for one completely get furiuos when my account name is "taken" by some guy that used it for 1 single post and left it 4 years ago. if i was a god first thing i would do is delete those inactive accounts and let people register with normal names isntead of "name456numberscausenameistakenorstupid". i got huge respect for companies that remove old inactive accounts, like Inbox.
ofc they do that automatically, but the point is there.

spartan231490:
snip

...that's not what this thread is about, and I'm pretty sure you know that. Please keep the gun control rants to the threads that are actually about gun control.

Recently a friend went to a job interview and she was told that she had to work on the phones for 4 hours or so as part of the job interview. For no money. This i think is a scam.

dozens of them from the microsoft scam, indian/pakistani orphanage scam through to everyones favourite nigerian 419 scam.

ive even ran a few reverse scams on the 419 crowd. you act dumb, keep a file detailing absolutely everything you tell them to keep the story straight and then just keep stringing them along as long as possible. they are after a scan of your passport? send them a completely junk file thats been renamed to passport.jpg "oh sorry i did what you told me all this computer stuff is new to me".

you win if you can get them to send you a photo of them holding a sign saying "hello iamamoron" for instance. 419 baiting a hobby everyone can enjoy

Gormech:
99% of the people in a pickup truck pulling into my driveway and trying to sell some meat/sandwiches saying that it's on sale because it's the last of the batch and they can't just let it go to waste. Same story EVERY SINGLE TIME.

We have a similar thing in the UK called the "white van" scam but with speakers. The speakers they are selling at massive discount are full of sawdust, just empty shells. Always some spares left over from a delivery.

Strazdas:

Comocat:
I was selling a chair or something on Craigslist and got an interested party. He then claimed that he accidentally mailed me a $2000 dollar check and if I would cash it for him and send him 1000 dollars I could keep the rest. I guess they mail you fake checks and get you to cash them for. Apparently this is a pretty popular scam for morons.

how do you cash a fake check? wouldnt the bank just tell you to FO and even call the police on you if you tried?

My brother fell for a couple of these (Desperate for money for more drugs.) You get a real looking (honestly, as far as forgeries go they were pretty good) check that some banks will cash no problem. Until about 5-10 days later when the forged check is discovered and they ask for that money back, plus fees for cashing a forged check. Ideally a bank can tell in a few minutes if a check is forged but the 3 he found that cashed it didn't, after all they're getting the money one way or another. He left here (with me threatening to kill him for stealing everything not bolted down!) 6000 dollars in debt to 3 local banks (and after having conned the bank into believing his drivers license being my dad's was a "honest mistake" on the part of the DMV.

I've run into the common "windows PC" scam a dozen times. They've called my cell phone, the landline phone our whole family shares, my mom's cell phone, and my dad's cell phone. I had a problem when said brother was staying here (he believed it, how funny is that? Man runs confidence schemes to fuel his drug habit and still fell for a indian man going "your computer has virus, it is windows system32 virus!") when he gave them access to my dad's computer. Usually I give them the run-around saying I cannot connect to their site, I don't know what password to use since my accounts always seem to end up getting stolen, etc. Once I said "but which computer, we have 4!" the woman on the other end actually said..."maybe...all are infect?" The "bapa booey bapa booey" line works fantastically too, especially if you do it in a drunken "bro" impression.

The worst are the diploma mills. I gave my school permission to give out my name, address and phone number to interested colleges and of course the military six years ago. I got 4 pamphlets from the military, 2 pamphlets from local colleges, and to this day get a weekly flier from a unaccredited school that offers courses that will give me nothing but a fake diploma.

I keep getting an e-mail from the 'post office' that says my package can't be delivered and I should contact them back. It's amazing how the post office got my e-mail address despite that not being part of my posting information and thus inaccessible to them.

triggrhappy94:
Having recently graduated High School and moved onto college, I've encountered a couple (convincing at first glance) scams. Both of them promise success with hard work, but ultimately you end up paying.

Shortly after graduating High School, I got a letter in the mail from "Vector International" or something like that. This will probably seem familiar to a lot of people. I was excited at first by the prospect that finding work could be that easy, but after reading I got the feeling of "too good to be true". I immediately looked them up on line and everything I found said that they were a scam.
For those not familiar with the proccess: Vector is a knife supply company. You have to buy a demo set (or at least you used to have to) which sets you back over a hundred bucks. From there you have to go door to door, or call people.
I actually knew a couple people who ended up doing it. One of them told me her boss was a total ass, and you only get paid if you can arrange presentations or make sales.

That's not a scam, that's called working for commission.

Eternal_Lament:
I've never fallen for it, but I've run into the Microsoft phone scam.

For those who don't know, the scam works like this. You receive a call, and the caller says that they're some sort of representative from Microsoft, but are in fact just from some call center in India (easy to tell from the accent). The caller claims that your PC (doesn't matter what you actually have, they'll just say your Windows PC) is infected with multiple viruses, and that they need your permission to help clean it up. By using tactics such as making standard system errors seem like virus reports, they convince the person to go through some program that allows the person on the other end to take control of the computer, at which point they'll access whatever files are on their and just end the call there. It's been around for a while, and I've gotten at least three instances of this scam being attempted. You would think that at this point people would wise up, although apparently many still fall for it.

Depending on my mood I like to troll these goons sometimes. Sometimes I pretend to play along until they let slip that they have no clue what OS I'm operating. Once I asked them "which computer?" To which he replied, "your windows operating computer." I said, "sure but which one? I have more than one." "How many do you have?" "Well shouldn't you know that?" *click*

Atbird:

triggrhappy94:

Trull:
Am I the only one around here that realized the scam bot in this thread wasn't actually a bot? (S)he should be unsuspended.

(S)he broke unwritten rule number 11 (I think), the "Triggr rule" (I came up with it back on the Unwritten Rules thread, I get to name it), which states that if you're going to be sarcastic you have to make some kind of indication aside from the sarcasm itself. This is the internet so people can't tell just by reading it.

If (s)he wants, I'm sure (s)he can appeal the suspension by PMing a mod and explaining the situation.
If not, the suspension will eventually go away, and (s)he will just be left with a warning.

It also posted in a thread of mine, and it's just a plain spambot. The "Nice Try" link was a joke on the part of the mods.

Indeed, every post made on that (new) account was the same spam. Suspension is too lenient. What it needs is a ban.

captcha : slender man is slender

Yay captcha is giving me memes in memes because I like memes. yo dog.

SomeLameStuff:
Oh yeah. Had a guy call my house phone and ask me for $10000 to get my daughter back.

Problem: I was 15 at the time, and sure as hell didn't have a daughter. AND scams like that had already hit the news, and the cops were telling people to watch out for it.

Heh, I've had plenty of emails telling me that the account I have at a bank I don't use is under threat.

Youtube scams are usually pretty obvious. "Hey, I think your channel has real potential, it could get really famous! Follow this link to increase your subscribers!" For one thing, my channel isn't very good, and for another, if there was a legit website with only the honest intention of allowing people to advertise their youtube channels, I'd probably know about it, and I really don't see a scenario in which I get away with using some kind of program that gives me artificial subs, even if I was to assume it wasn't a goddamn virus.

I was also once approached in the street by someone with terrible english trying to get me to pay for his petrol because his bank account wasn't working and that he'd send the money to my account. From his account, I'm guessing? The broken account? GG, bro.

Y'know, I'm not actually sure of the scam here, but once I was randomly contacted on youtube of all places by someone trying to convert me to Islam. I'll give him credit, he was a hell of a lot more polite than the typical christian street preacher technique of "YOU! YOU'RE A TERRIBLE PERSON AND YOU'RE GOING TO HELL, AND YOU SHOULD FEEL BAD!"

Eternal_Lament:
I've never fallen for it, but I've run into the Microsoft phone scam.

For those who don't know, the scam works like this. You receive a call, and the caller says that they're some sort of representative from Microsoft, but are in fact just from some call centre in India (easy to tell from the accent). The caller claims that your PC (doesn't matter what you actually have, they'll just say your Windows PC) is infected with multiple viruses, and that they need your permission to help clean it up. By using tactics such as making standard system errors seem like virus reports, they convince the person to go through some program that allows the person on the other end to take control of the computer, at which point they'll access whatever files are on their and just end the call there. It's been around for a while, and I've gotten at least three instances of this scam being attempted. You would think that at this point people would wise up, although apparently many still fall for it.

I had that exact same thing. Except having had a few actual errors, I ALMOST fell for it, until I rather wisely googled the website he asked me to go to instead of just going to it, then making it clear that I wasn't going to let him access my files but if he explained what the issues were that Id appreciate it and could fix them myself knowing enough about my computer/having much more experienced friends who could help me. He started shouting down the phone at me for not paying attention to him and refusing to give him access until he eventually hung up in frustration because I was questioning everything he said (I was bored, and it started to amuse me once I'd caught on but he didn't know I hadn't fallen for it).

Highlight of the conversation:

Scammer "Sir, you're computer is broken and doesn't load up properly"

Me "I just turned it on and it worked fine, just like the last 6 or seven times I have in the last day or so..."

Scammer "SIR! YOU'RE NOT LISTENING TO ME! YOUR COMPUTER IS BROKEN!!!

Mr.Cynic88:
I recently received an automated cold call from somebody with a nigerian-esque accent saying that if I donated money to him, he would pray for me. Being both logical and an atheist, I hung up, but I'm sure there are plenty of old/religious people who may have taken the bait.

Is that a scam, though? If they really do pray for you, then it's paying for a service. Sure, a service that does nothing, but it's not like he promised for a god to help you if you donated.

Which are scams.
My uncle is religious, and he has been taken advantage of by religious organisations that promised to heal his health problems if he had faith. (and of course, the way to show your faith is by giving them money.)

On a more cheerful note, my aunt loves to troll her relatives with scam-calls. (Of course, no-one loses money over it)
She once sent a pair of knitted old socks to my other aunt with a letter about how their family had been chosen for study for the new super-socks, and asked them to try the socks out and keep a diary about the effects. The target aunt and her mother-in-law fell for it for about a week.

One other time this aunt called my grandmother, pretending to be a police officer (she can disguise her voice), and first started asking if my grandma had taken her dog on a walk to the nearby park. My grandmother got scared, of course, since she was afraid the police was calling because she hadn't collected the dog's poo, and my aunt let her believe it for a while, before starting to go on about how there had been a bear in the park and the police was calling everyone to warn them about the bear...

My aunt could make a living by scamming people. Then again, she owns a company that sells stationary and that kind of stuff, so maybe she already does...

Eternal_Lament:
I've never fallen for it, but I've run into the Microsoft phone scam.

For those who don't know, the scam works like this. You receive a call, and the caller says that they're some sort of representative from Microsoft, but are in fact just from some call center in India (easy to tell from the accent). The caller claims that your PC (doesn't matter what you actually have, they'll just say your Windows PC) is infected with multiple viruses, and that they need your permission to help clean it up. By using tactics such as making standard system errors seem like virus reports, they convince the person to go through some program that allows the person on the other end to take control of the computer, at which point they'll access whatever files are on their and just end the call there. It's been around for a while, and I've gotten at least three instances of this scam being attempted. You would think that at this point people would wise up, although apparently many still fall for it.

My grandfather fell for that one. My grandmother will never let him hear the end of it, luckily she found out fast enough to call the bank company and stop too much money going out.

I had 'Microsoft support' call me the other day because of problems they had found on my computer. I told them I was a computer science graduate and that what they were doing was illegal. They hung up pretty quick.

Res Plus:

Gormech:
99% of the people in a pickup truck pulling into my driveway and trying to sell some meat/sandwiches saying that it's on sale because it's the last of the batch and they can't just let it go to waste. Same story EVERY SINGLE TIME.

We have a similar thing in the UK called the "white van" scam but with speakers. The speakers they are selling at massive discount are full of sawdust, just empty shells. Always some spares left over from a delivery.

it's actually kinda creepy how many countries have the same scam and in australia we also call it the white van scam since the scammers are always for some reason in a white van

had the same scam attempted on me and 2 work colleges in a truck on the way to a job once, the conversation went roughly:
"hey wanna buy a cheap stereo. last one left from the factory 100% legit"
"go fuck yourself"

the scam itself sometimes isn't technically a scam. what they offer you is a ridiculously low priced high tech item and what you end up getting is something which is cheaper but usually worth about what you paid.

RyQ_TMC:
1) When I was on vacation in Rome, a guy stopped by in a car and asked for directions to Piazza del Popolo. Despite an obvious question of "why are you asking a tourist", I humored him and gave him the directions. He then launched into a story about how he's a sales rep for Hugo Boss or something, showed me a bunch of (obviously fake) windstoppers he had on the pilot seat, he'll happily give one to me, but you know, he's been driving in circles for hours, he's out of gas and he doesn't have any change, so if he could get some money for that... I told him I didn't have any, his facial expression immediately changed from "friendly" to "fuck you" in that weird way only Italians can pull off and he drove off.

Oh my god, someone tried that on me and my friend when we were on a research trip to Rome too! Though it was some old guy claiming to be a Versace designer, in the city for a fashion show but had got lost. He had a catalogue of "the latest designs" (which were clearly cut out of magazines and stuck into a scrap-book), and offered me a shirt/jacket and my friend a bag (which he had piles of on the back seat) if we could give him directions (and "for being friendly"). He spent a good 10 minutes trying to sweet-talk us. Then he claimed to be out of fuel, did not have any cash, and that the petrol station (which we could see a few hundred meters behind him) wouldn't accept Visa credit-cards. We could only have his designer gear if we'd give him 20-50 Euros...each (I think, might have been 200 Euros). Funnily enough, we told him to scram.

The facial expression change is something delightful to behold, and you are quite right, I've never seen anyone but an Italian pull it off. Still, he put a lot of effort into his scam, and I am certain that it must work on some tourists.

Laggyteabag:
When I was in Rome on holiday in 2010, myself and my parents were walking to the Colosseum when a man driving a 2-door hired Fiat pulled up next to us, he said that he was none other than Giorgio Armani and he wanted to sell us a "next-season" jacket for the tiny price of 1500€ because he wanted to buy fuel. He even pulled out a few covers of a magazine with pictures of him on the front posing as Giorgio Armani. Now, even if it was him, why was he in a 2-door Fiat hire care, and why was he even DRIVING in the first place?

Haha, so that is 3 of us in the same thread that have experienced similar scams! I was wondering why the old guy was in a kinda crummy Fiat/other small car, did seem a little odd for such a high-profile designer...thinking about it, my scammer may have been claiming to be Armani, rather than Versace

To both the above quoted posters:

Out of interest, whereabouts in Rome were you when you were approached by these car-based scammers?

Queen Michael:

spartan231490:
snip

...that's not what this thread is about, and I'm pretty sure you know that. Please keep the gun control rants to the threads that are actually about gun control.

It's too important. I will spread the word wherever I can, if even 1 person hears the truth who hasn't before I will consider it a job well done. No matter how much people get angry at me for it.

Biggest Scam # 2, HR 347. The back-room politics bill no one ever heard about that conditionalizes the first amendment. That's right folks, peaceful protests and free speech are no longer allowed at any event being protected by the secret service. Participating in such a protest is a felony now. I'm not saying the US is about to become a fascist state. I'm just saying we should probably put on our tin-foil hats.

Licourtrix:

I've run into the common "windows PC" scam a dozen times. They've called my cell phone, the landline phone our whole family shares, my mom's cell phone, and my dad's cell phone. I had a problem when said brother was staying here (he believed it, how funny is that? Man runs confidence schemes to fuel his drug habit and still fell for a indian man going "your computer has virus, it is windows system32 virus!") when he gave them access to my dad's computer. Usually I give them the run-around saying I cannot connect to their site, I don't know what password to use since my accounts always seem to end up getting stolen, etc. Once I said "but which computer, we have 4!" the woman on the other end actually said..."maybe...all are infect?" The "bapa booey bapa booey" line works fantastically too, especially if you do it in a drunken "bro" impression.

I see a lot of this posted around and we dont really have such scam here. i guess the average person isnt as computer-owning as it should be.
Thing is, our ISP would leginatelly call you for viruses. if your computer is zombified, they woudl call and tell you about it. but its not about getting information, the chat would go like this:
"Hello is this <name lastname>?"
"yes"
"You are in contract for internet <name>. Your computer is spreading viruses. fix it in 30 days or we will cancel your internet contract"
and then depending on mood they would try to help you or not. but its not a scam, they genuinely try to stop viruses.

It's too important. I will spread the word wherever I can, if even 1 person hears the truth who hasn't before I will consider it a job well done. No matter how much people get angry at me for it.

Biggest Scam # 2, HR 347. The back-room politics bill no one ever heard about that conditionalizes the first amendment. That's right folks, peaceful protests and free speech are no longer allowed at any event being protected by the secret service. Participating in such a protest is a felony now. I'm not saying the US is about to become a fascist state. I'm just saying we should probably put on our tin-foil hats.

every lunatic thinks his information is important. once again, this is not a thread about it.

I haven't been a victim of it. But I got home one day to find my mum on the phone with some guy from some tech company who had called to tell her that they had detected a fault in her computer, and that she needed to pay for some software to fix it. My mum's computer did have an issue at the time, and her being computer illiterate bought their software and started downloading it.
Thankfully, I arrived before it was fully installed and could copy her hard drive for any personal information but they still got 70 euros out of us.

My mother received a prize notification letter in the post, saying she had definitely won at least one of the following prizes - a car, a big huge cash sum, a tv, a mobile phone, and another pile of big awesome stuff. she just had to reply, and one of these prizes was definitely hers.

Reading the prize breakdown closely revealled that all the big awesome prizes were 1 only. the big number of prizes were the mobile phones, numbering in the hundreds of thousands, so overwhelmingly, people were going to be winning these mobile phones.

Said phones came with mandatory 24 month contracts of 30 a month, so your 'free prize' would be costing you just over 700

spartan231490:

Queen Michael:

spartan231490:
snip

...that's not what this thread is about, and I'm pretty sure you know that. Please keep the gun control rants to the threads that are actually about gun control.

It's too important. I will spread the word wherever I can, if even 1 person hears the truth who hasn't before I will consider it a job well done. No matter how much people get angry at me for it.

Biggest Scam # 2, HR 347. The back-room politics bill no one ever heard about that conditionalizes the first amendment. That's right folks, peaceful protests and free speech are no longer allowed at any event being protected by the secret service. Participating in such a protest is a felony now. I'm not saying the US is about to become a fascist state. I'm just saying we should probably put on our tin-foil hats.

Fact remains, you should keep it to the appropriate threads or you'll get the moderators.

Queen Michael:

spartan231490:

Queen Michael:

...that's not what this thread is about, and I'm pretty sure you know that. Please keep the gun control rants to the threads that are actually about gun control.

It's too important. I will spread the word wherever I can, if even 1 person hears the truth who hasn't before I will consider it a job well done. No matter how much people get angry at me for it.

Biggest Scam # 2, HR 347. The back-room politics bill no one ever heard about that conditionalizes the first amendment. That's right folks, peaceful protests and free speech are no longer allowed at any event being protected by the secret service. Participating in such a protest is a felony now. I'm not saying the US is about to become a fascist state. I'm just saying we should probably put on our tin-foil hats.

Fact remains, you should keep it to the appropriate threads or you'll get the moderators.

I don't see how it was inappropriate. The thread asked about scams, I posted scams.

Hexenwolf:

That's not a scam, that's called working for commission.

It's not that they rip you off. It's that, unless you know a lot of rich people or are in an area without a lot competition, you end up getting payed far less then minimum wage for a job that works you to death.

spartan231490:
Snip.

I wasn't going to say anything. But please try to keep the gun stuff to either thread explicitly about guns or (more preferably) the RnP section.

I encountered Vector myself. They sent this brochure with pictures of young people in suits working in a business environment, but when I got to the building it was a rundown rented out space that sold knives. I immediately turned them down.

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