Clinical Depression, Struggles With

 Pages 1 2 3 NEXT
 

Disclaimer: I don't recommend reading this if you're depressed or think you might be. This is all pretty heavy handed stuff.
There's also a decent amount of whinging in this post, but I'll try to keep it to a minimum.
While I may be a university student, depression is still a very real thing, especially among people in my age group. The Social Readjustment Scale measures how likely you are to be affected by mental illness and I scored 454. A major risk is considered above 300.

Everyone has issues. These could be anything from minor self-image problems to incredible cynicism. We all have them in one way shape or form and we all like to say, "You can get help. There's always someone willing to listen." However, that's not always true. For example, I'm depressed and I've got an appointment with a therapist lined up next week to try to sort everything out.

This kind of treatment, however basic, isn't available to everyone. Not everyone can afford a therapist and even if you can, finding one that will actually help you can be a challenge in of itself. Ironically, what got me thinking about depression was Depression Quest, a "choose-your-own-adventure" game about depression. I recommend playing through it and choosing the answers that you would actually pick instead of the ones that would help you the most. I played through it and began thinking, "These are some of the symptoms of depression? I've got a few of those myself." I talked to the healthcare clinic on campus and was diagnosed with depression.

So now, I'm hoping things will get a little better and I can't start to, well, feel again.

Here's the discussion portion: Do you know anyone that has dealt with depression? How did they get out of it? Are they still struggling with it?
If you do know anyone that is depressed, or if you are, best of luck. The world's a tough place, but maybe, just maybe, we'll make it out.

Heehee I played Depression Quest as well, I ended up with a pretty good ending in that I became no longer depressed. A few of the choices did actually sound familiar..

I knew someone who was dealing with depression, Me along with their therapist helped them through it. I was just a friend that stayed with them, helped em through the hard times, basically someone to talk to that wasn't a therapist. I don't believe they're struggling with it anymore, last time I talked to them they seemed rather cheery.

I didn't get a good ending with Depression Quest. I didn't even get a mildly optimistic ending. I've had ups and downs, but I've never been so badly depressed that I couldn't get out of bed and do the things that I needed to do. My problem is just talking to people, particularly my family, but I have a few very good friends I can confide in.

I know some other people who have it worse than I do, I think my need to see them feel better helps me as well.

I have been there too.
I got a dog, and found a style of living that suits me and my personality.
Now I am much much happier and havent been too low for quite a while.

Therapy and medication can help you live with depression, maybe stop it from dominating your life, but it never goes away.

I don't know. You've got to try things like going out and spending time with people, being in a relationship with someone and doing things as a couple, develop your career. If you do all those things then maybe all your problems will go away, alternatively you might find all of it degrading, shameful, dishonest and meaningless no matter how "good" things are going.

In the latter case I'm not sure that it is a defeat. I think it just means that you've got to find a way to live your life that works for you and, ideally, doesn't hurt anyone else. Principles are important, routine too, for adding structure to existence.

Currently going through a bout of it myself. It sucks balls.

Have you tried exercise?

A remember hearing a recent study which found exercise to be a better antidepressant than most pharmaceutical drugs.
That being said, I overcame depression several years ago through a form of controversial drug therapy. For those in an extreme position, lsd or mdma therapy can be used with great caution and a professional/smart guiding hand.

mitchell271:
Do you know anyone that has dealt with depression?

Yes, I have clinical depression and have had it for about 6 years now, my brother has depression (Didn't pay much attention to what was mentioned... Not the sort of thing we discuss) and my dad is bipolar (AKA: Manic Depression)

How did they get out of it?

My brother and dad take medication to deal with it, I'm fortunate in that I don't need any medication in order to deal with my depression, instead I can force myself to think about all the people I care about and how I'm making them feel whilst in my depressive states (Also, when I'm contemplating suicide I think back to how sad everyone got when my mother died)

Are they still struggling with it?.

My brother isn't struggling, as long as he takes his medication. My dad doesn't get depressed but the heavy medication cripples him. Personally I'm still struggling as I will have periods of about a week or 2 where I'll not want to do anything, will have no will to go on and will do nothing, often at the detriment to any social or educational events and relationships.

I'm currently depressed, I'd say. Nothing chemically imbalanced, but due to circumstances. I'm turning 30, don't like my job, lost a family member a month ago, my parents are retiring and moving thousands of miles away, selling the house I lived in for 27 years, etc.

I know I'm very well off and everything will work out, but I still feel really down every day. I'm hoping it'll get better as I'm applying for other jobs (not better, but more in line with what I enjoy doing even if I lose income and stability), execising more and trying to go out more, too.

It's also the time of year, and the fact that winter won't let the fuck go of the Canadian prairies. It's currently -16, -25 with the windchill, so I'm pretty fucking unhappy with that. I'm also always stuck in an office without sunlight.

This is certainly something I can relate to- anyone that spends any time on the Advice forum might notice I make some kind of thread about some issue every few months. Whether or not I have clinical depression remains to be seen, but I've been sort of forced into booking a counselling session with the university's counsellors after I let slip how I was feeling to my mum. It's a big step to admit that there might actually be something wrong with me, I tend to think I am just being silly and that I'm just being dramatic to myself.

I've been told to look after myself, eat well, exercise and keep my room tidy. It does help, but it's by no means a cure. I'm hoping some proper counselling will help me out.

EDIT: Thanks for showing me depression quest. It's pretty scary, a lot of it seems to be worryingly what I do. It's very affecting, I played it through doing what I would do first, then tried to play it in different ways after. I found I couldn't bring myself to make the choices that I knew were the worst to get the worst ending.

Yeah, I've been diagnosed with clinical depression, generalized anxiety, and OCD. I've currently been seeing a nurse/therapist every week as part of my CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy), and I've been already taking Fluoxetine for a couple of months. There are some days where I feel optimistic about stuff, but then there are other days when I just don't feel like doing anything anymore and one thing can occur in my day to make me descend into a spiral of self-loathing and overbearing cynicism. It's not really a good existence to live.

But funnily enough, I have hope. I mean, I'm only seventeen, am still living with my parents - when I think about it, I guess my life hasn't started yet. They say that patience is a virtue, and all that. And if I'm fifty and nothing has worked, I guess I would've eventually overcome my fear enough to successfully commit suicide and escape this living hell we call Earth. I mean...is adulthood worse than adolescence, on average? I don't know. I'm just really scared of everything: myself, other people, full independence, if I'm going to succeed on my ambitions, etc.

I don't know anyone else that's depressed, although I do have a suspicion that one of my friends is, because she's constantly putting herself down, and her ex-boyfriend occasionally insults her for seemingly no apparent reason. I didn't do the "Depression Quest", because I've already answered one of those things for my therapist, and I'm waiting for the results.

i tried it, I got bored really quickly

I am a clinical depressive, and have taken medication for about 17 years now. I do therapy once a month, as the medication helps control it, the therapy at this point in time is sort of a check in and to refill my prescription. When i was first diagnosed it was after a suicide attempt, and i was hospitalized for 10 days. When they tried to cycle me off meds i ended up back in the hospital. Meds control it, but it is not a perfect solution. I have had my meds changed once or twice to help keep up with newer styles and what not.

I exercise daily, make sure to get good sleep, and am lucky enough to have a supportive wife who understands and 2 wonderful little kids that force me to take care of myself. after all of these life developments they tried to cylce me off meds again, and it was not a good idea.

I accept certain things, and that alone helps combat it. I accept that i will be on medication for the rest of mylife most likely, whether i want to be or not (too many things to lose and too many people whose live i would effect in potentially horrible ways).

Things that help me beyond the meds and therapy check in: the exercise, the good sleep, positive interactions with people, and not putting myself in bad situations that i know could trigger an episode. Finally, acceptance...it really took accepting certain things about myself, and that led to me making the types of changes that i needed.

Sadly, if it is clinical in someway there is really only controlling it, you cannot "get out" of it. Sure there are stories that people take meds for 6 weeks or whatever and are fine after that....sorry that isn't clinical. Clinical is something you have to live with, and control.

In essence find something that works for you and use it. But, and this is a big one, don't expect to be cured if it qualifies as truly "clinical."

mitchell271:
Disclaimer: I don't recommend reading this if you're depressed or think you might be. This is all pretty heavy handed stuff.
There's also a decent amount of whinging in this post, but I'll try to keep it to a minimum.
While I may be a university student, depression is still a very real thing, especially among people in my age group. The Social Readjustment Scale measures how likely you are to be affected by mental illness and I scored 454. A major risk is considered above 300.

Everyone has issues. These could be anything from minor self-image problems to incredible cynicism. We all have them in one way shape or form and we all like to say, "You can get help. There's always someone willing to listen." However, that's not always true. For example, I'm depressed and I've got an appointment with a therapist lined up next week to try to sort everything out.

This kind of treatment, however basic, isn't available to everyone. Not everyone can afford a therapist and even if you can, finding one that will actually help you can be a challenge in of itself. Ironically, what got me thinking about depression was Depression Quest, a "choose-your-own-adventure" game about depression. I recommend playing through it and choosing the answers that you would actually pick instead of the ones that would help you the most. I played through it and began thinking, "These are some of the symptoms of depression? I've got a few of those myself." I talked to the healthcare clinic on campus and was diagnosed with depression.

So now, I'm hoping things will get a little better and I can't start to, well, feel again.

Here's the discussion portion: Do you know anyone that has dealt with depression? How did they get out of it? Are they still struggling with it?
If you do know anyone that is depressed, or if you are, best of luck. The world's a tough place, but maybe, just maybe, we'll make it out.

I'm terribly sorry to hear all of that. My family (including myself) all have major history of depression (including some suicides), it doesn't matter how successful someone is, or how well adjusted they seem, anyone can be depressed. So yes it is a very real thing, and it is very difficult to battle. I feel pretty well right now, but I do have occasional bouts of depression, some lasting longer than others. I have tried therapy (by far the most useful) and medications. So far I've found the medication doesn't work at all on me. The only thing that has ever helped me get through my depressions is to work myself down to the root of the problem and do something to change it. Even then it doesn't ease up instantly (don't be fooled, because you will feel better immediately, don't fall into that trap), it takes time for your mind to heal, just like the body.

I have clinical depression but recently I have been coping better mostly because they have found out I've been suffering from a serious illness for the last 21 years. This has made me feel like past things haven't been my fault like my ex being mad I couldn't get pregnant and chronic fatigue plaguing my existence.

I know I'll never get rid of the depression but at least things are looking up for me as the disease is incurable but treatable. I'm already eating a tiny amount compared to what I was before and lost loads of weight.

I know this isn't very helpful for you but I also found counselling really helped me. It took me a long time to find a guy who I found helpful though.

Exercise is probably the best cure I can recommend for any sort of mental illness (along with staying away from alcohol & caffeine, and getting a good night's sleep).

I've had mild depression & reactive psychosis before, so hang in there...it's horrible but life does go on.

That's depression?!? Can I have that please? That, as described, is a simple chemical imbalance in an otherwise functional societal situation. Change him into someone who sees and acts with extreme clarity and can't find any truth anywhere, only lies that lead to denegration/backlash when exposed.

Do you know anyone that has dealt with depression?
Yeah, I've had it for about six years, my parents have had it longer. It's very...weird to be honest, like you're forever sinking in the dark but each day you manage to keep you head above it, or get it out.

How did they get out of it?
My parents take medication, I went off mine a couple of months ago because it seemed to do more bad than good. I went to about 5 different therapists in the past which didn't really help. After my dad went to a special clinic for PTSD people in the Police he's been managing much better.

Are they still struggling with it?
Everyone with depression will have good days and bad days. I myself do pretty well most days, I have to make sure I don't get bored. My parents have been getting on my back about getting a job even though I'm going overseas in a little over 2 months. With a physical disability in a relatively small town it's hard to get a job, especially one where tehy'll keep your position after a short time. It gets my irritability up when they bring up the subject, I start to yell and get aggressive, then sulk in my room.

My friends are all pretty far away, I keep in contact with them through Steam and Facebook though. I Skype with my girlfriend and some other friends so my social life is okay. But I don't leave the house much anymore, I don't even exercise. It's either too hot or I'm socializing and it's just...boring. If I start to deeply think I start to worry, and that's just not good for me. I'm gonna see what happens after my U.S trip in June, a change of scenery might help. I've been starting to write again so that's a plus for me, makes me worry a little less. I've just gotta work on motivation and my insecurity with myself.

I have been diagnosed with clinical depression several years ago, and I was given many different anti-depressants. Right now in my life I do not take any medication and I do not see a therapist. I can't really explain why I felt like I didn't need to take drugs anymore but I stopped and it really doesn't feel any different from when I was.

I think the best thing I can recomend is to find some way to get your mind focused on anything but you. Of course I certainly understand that that is much easier said than done, but I think that really helps. Perhaps you can direct energy and attention towards a friend or family member. If you do not feel particulary close to someone at all, I would also recommend setting projects for yourself. Find something creative to do with something you enjoy. I found that when I was depressed the more idle time I had, the more focused on myself I was and that made me worse. However, if I kept my mind active, I could manage my depression better because I wasn't so focused on me.

Also, I now have such a deep appreciation for comedy because a good laugh always helped me so much when I was depressed. Maybe you could try looking for more comedic outlets like say on YouTube channels or something.

I've been trying to over come my depression for a few years now, I like to think I've made progress since a while ago I know I couldn't face a day and just seeing the outside world through a window could just burn my eyes and remind me that I've made myself a place and there's nothing I can do to leave. These days though I've managed to get outside most days and stay in my positive state of mind for a short while at least.

Yes I still have my very bad days, but now I constantly fight off the negative thoughts so I'm not stuck for longer than a day in that mind set. One day I'm hoping I can just wake up and have the drive to do what I know I can do, but for now I'm happy enough with my ability to think a little more positively about myself and what's happening in my life. =)

I was diagnosed with clinical depression and a general as anxiety disorder when I was 15. From 15-19 I was a barely functional shell, and my grades and relationships faltered greatly because of it. I'm almost 21 now, and I do have advice to help you get back on track:

1) Take your medication, especially if your depression is caused by a serotonin imbalance, where your body is physically not making enough to allow you to even feel that happy.
2) Therapy. Professional or even just a place where you can talk to someone without being judged. Someone who'll allow you to speak, express yourself and organize your thoughts.
3) Think about yourself and put you first. Do what makes you feel comfortable and happy. Push yourself a little bit by bit until you can start fully functioning again. Avoid as many triggers as possible. Focus on simple pleasures.

Of course, results may vary and always consult a doctor if you do think you are depressed, especially if you feel suicidal.

I think I have it. I don't want to be one of those guys who self-diagnoses themselves by looking at WebMD, but everything honestly seems so bleak. My home situation is possibly irreparable between my mother and I, my grades are awful, despite the fact that I should be getting A's. These days, I do little more than go through the daily ins and outs of going to VI Form, and then coming home, thinking about doing work, shrugging it off and watching anime instead, until 11pm.

Honestly, the idea of going to the doctor's about it scares me. I've been to therapy before, more than once, and all it succeeded in doing, was making me feel worse. And I absolutely hate the idea of being drug-dependant. But I'm not entirely sure what to do anymore.

Edit: I played that game. Ended up with what seemed like the worst possible outcome =/

Wow, big pharma really does have an influence over today's society. Especially now that everyone is convinced they are suffering from some sort of "clinical depression" or "chemical imbalance".

AstroSmash:
Wow, big pharma really does have an influence over today's society. Especially now that everyone is convinced they are suffering from some sort of "clinical depression" or "chemical imbalance".

I'd get mad at you, but something tells me it wouldn't be worthwhile.

AstylahAthrys:
I was diagnosed with clinical depression and a general as anxiety disorder when I was 15. From 15-19 I was a barely functional shell, and my grades and relationships faltered greatly because of it. I'm almost 21 now, and I do have advice to help you get back on track:

1) Take your medication, especially if your depression is caused by a serotonin imbalance, where your body is physically not making enough to allow you to even feel that happy.
2) Therapy. Professional or even just a place where you can talk to someone without being judged. Someone who'll allow you to speak, express yourself and organize your thoughts.
3) Think about yourself and put you first. Do what makes you feel comfortable and happy. Push yourself a little bit by bit until you can start fully functioning again. Avoid as many triggers as possible. Focus on simple pleasures.

Of course, results may vary and always consult a doctor if you do think you are depressed, especially if you feel suicidal.

As someone who suffered for 7 years and is now more or less free of it, these points are well worth remembering, and I will add a fourth one of my own:

4) Don't try to improve everything at once. You will most likely fail, and that will bring you down to the level you were, or worse yet, end up with you being more depressed than you were.

My advice is to take it slowly, improving a little each week. you're not supposed to be cured of depression in a months time. If you are reading this,you are most likely young, and contrary to what people tell you, the average lifespan is a looong time. You can afford to take a year or two to fix your mood:)

bastardofmelbourne:

AstroSmash:
Wow, big pharma really does have an influence over today's society. Especially now that everyone is convinced they are suffering from some sort of "clinical depression" or "chemical imbalance".

I'd get mad at you, but something tells me it wouldn't be worthwhile.

America has a drug problem.

Edit: How many of you take medication for your depression? I'm not denying something like depression exists, but some people mistake clinical depression for being sad (including me, some time ago). I just see it everywhere: "You are depressed, you can't pay attention, you have anxiety, you're not normal; just like everyone else. Take some medicine. Side effects may vary."

I have a mentally ill family member. And it wouldn't take you more than 10 seconds to notice it, yet some people take meds that are considered to be strong for her, for "depression".

Doctor's just hand out any kind of medicine for any kind of 'disorder', no matter how strong it is. Usually even very different. 15 minute med checkups don't help.

Depression is overdiagnosed and overmedicated.

Want to see what a chemical imbalance in your brain really does? It's far more serious than feeling sad.

Same with aspergers. People who have aspergers need lots of help. They're not just nervous in social situations. Most people are. Aspies are more like Rain Man, rather than Napoleon Dynamite.

I'm a psychologist professionally, and I'd like to just chime in with some really common-sense tips ... that are all too frequently ignored.

The three pillars of health, psychological and physical, are sleep, exercise and diet. The keys are "what", "when", "how much".

Poor sleep patterns are a major indicator of depression, but they're also a major cause of depression. This naturally creates a spiral when someone becomes depressed, where they can't get to sleep, because they're depressed and all they can think about is how incredibly hopeless things are, and so they don't get enough sleep, which causes fatigue and makes you less able to cope with the depression. Note that if you're waking up multiple times during the night then this is an indicator of anxiety, not depression, although very frequently people have both anxiety and depression, so they can't get to sleep, then when they do get to sleep they wake up again at random intervals during the night... and can't get back to sleep.

Exercise is another big factor. Despite what your "ripped" friends may say you can get too much exercise, and you can also get too little. Over-exercising can lead to brain chemistry imbalances that normally cause anxiety, but can also cause depression (also people often over-exercise because of underlying self-esteem issues). Under-exercising likewise isn't a great idea since endophins are released during exercise and these can help counteract mild depression and anxiety, as well as keeping your brain and body healthy. Likewise the current media emphasis on being "trim" leads to self-esteem issue for those who are viewed as overweight.

Diet is s dirty 4-letter word for many people. I'm not using it in the sense of "Atkins" or whatever the latest insane fad is. Rather I'm using the term to refer to what you eat, when you eat, and how much you eat. Our bodies are chemical engines, and what you put in is critical. If you haven't watched "Super Size Me" then I recommend it. What most people don't think about though is how much they're eating and when they're eating. Too much of a certain chemical entering the bloodstream at once can cause psychological problems. Just think about when you were a kid and you'd eat a candy bar, get a huge "sugar rush" and then collapse asleep an hour later, exhausted ater running around like a maniac for 30 minutes.

The three pillars are heavily inter-related, for example eating turkey or chicken (rich in tryptophan) makes you feel sleepy, and while you sleep tryoptophan metabolises into melanin and melatonin, and when you wake up in the morning sunlight helps transforms melatonin into seratonin, creating a sense of well-being.

Here are some very simple tips that anyone can follow to decrease the symptoms of depression (note: decrease the symptoms. No-one is immune to depression, we all have good days and bad days, and the expectation that we should be "happy" all the time is both unrealistic and a big problem with modern society. Aim to be "contented" and you'll be a happier person):

1. Sleep
- Avoid coffee and other stimulants for 2 hours before bed time.
- Do not exercise for 2 hours before bed time.
- Avoid computers, TVs and other bright screens (like iPads) for 1 hour before bed time. The frequency of light emitted by these devices makes our brains think that it is day time, and impairs our ability to get to sleep.
- Go to bed at the same time every night, even on the weekends. A couple of late nights a month is okay, expecting yourself to be okay on Monday when you normally sleep 10pm to 6am, but have been sleeping 6am to 10am on Satuday and Sunday is just ridiculous.
- When in bed lie down and go to sleep. Beds are for two things, sleeping and sex.... and you can have sex lots of other places too, so keep your bed for sleeping.
- Sleep for 7 to 9 hours. Not more, not less. Yes, you can "cope" with less sleep, but it is damaging your mental health slowly but surely. If you're sleeping less than 6 hours a night your risk of major depression doubles to triples.
- Follow the 20/40 rule. If you're not going to sleep in 20 minutes by just lying there with your eyes closed then get up and do something light (washing dishes, reading a book - not watching TV or playing on your computer) for 40 minutes, then get back into bed and try again. This method is somewhat brutal, but it sure beats lying in bed allowing your mind to dwell on everything that you're worried about. Repeat the 20/40 cycle regularly until it works (I've never had a patient that it didn't work for inside of 4 days).
- Meditate while going to sleep. No, I don't mean buy some cheap incense and saying "Om!", I mean when you're in bed try some meditative breathing exercises. The one I suggest most often is to breath in slowly and lightly through the nose (lowering your diaphram as opposed to expanding your chest) for a count of 4, then hold the breath lightly for a count of 2 or 3, then breath out slowly through your nose or mouth (personal preference) for a count of 3 or 4 (allow your lungs to empty normally, don't push). This is known as parasympathetic breathing, and it does a lot of good things, from lowering blood pressure to encouraging voluntary control of automatic body processes... also, on a most simple level, it distracts you from all the stuff you're stressing about. Initially this exercise will seem difficult, but if you practice is regularly then a few breaths will induce a sense of well-being and control after a few months. Initially it will just feel like this irritating exercise this guy on the internet told you to do. Stick with it.

[Note: There is some personal variation in all of the above. For example some people favour a 15/30 pattern, and some people hold their breath on the breathing exercise for just 1 second. Human bodies aren't all the same, find what you're comfortable with)

Exercise
- Exercise at the same time every day, for the same amount of time. This establishes a pattern and helps to regulate your metabolism, allowing your body to know what to expect and when. Make changes to your exercise routine slowly and progressively rather than dramatically. I started with 3 sets of 15 push-ups, then 15 sit-ups as my morning routine, now my regular routine is 3 sets of 100 push-ups and 100 sit-ups, slowly increasing with 1 extra push-up and sit-up a week over 2 years. Initially 3 sets of 15 push-ups was hard work, now I get a light sweat from 100.
- Exercise lightly and consistently. The goal is to get a light sweat doing. Cycling, hiking/walking, moderate weight lifting, tai chi, yoga, or just push-ups and sit-ups in your room... these are all good choices. Heavy weight lifting or sitting behind your desk lifting a can of mountain dew are bad choices.
- No pain, no pain. I hear the idiotic phrase, "no pain, no gain" repeated endlessly. Pain is your body's way of warning you that you're damaging things. Exercising until you begin to feel a "burn" is good. Continuing to exercise when you're in pain is idiotic. Don't do it. It has extremely negative effects on brain chemistry.
- Meditate while you exercise. This is a good way to tell if you're doing too much. If you're panting and can't maintain an even breathing pattern then the odds are good that you're overdoing it. Stop, take a breather and dial it back a notch.

Diet
- Eat at the same time every day, and roughly the same amount. Again, this is critical in allowing your body and brain to know what to expect.
- Eat half. When we're hungry our brains tend to flash warning signals and demand FOOD... LOTS of FOOD! Normally when you're hungry your assessment of how much you need to eat is off by about 50%. When you're hungry bear this in mind. Eat half your food slowly (try to take more than 15 minutes) and then take a break. If you're still hungry 30 minutes later (the time it takes for your brain to send the "I'm full" signal) then eat the rest. If you're not then put it in a tupperware for your next meal. Remember that different foods have different calorie values, so the "eat half" rule is a guideline.
- Eat a variety of things and don't stress too much about what you're eating unless you have an allergy/intolerance. The key here is "moderation in all things". A cola every now and again (maybe small 200ml cola once or twice a week) isn't going to hurt. Drinking a liter/quart of cola every day will seriously damage your health. Likewise a beer a couple of times a week isn't a problem, but if you're drinking until you get drunk every day then you definitely need to get help. There's a lot of fuss made about butter vs margarine, etc. Mostly if you're only eating small amounts occassionally then it isn't going to make a huge impact on your lifespan or general health. One of my personal bugbears (warning, personal prejudice ahead) is MSG (monosodium glutemate), because it interferes with the brains' "I'm full" signal, causing you to eat more than you should, so I avoid MSG like the plague. Generally though I'd simply advise people to avoid being "extreme" in their diet. If you want to be a vegetarian then I'd say fine, but try to eat a little chicken/fish/eggs once in a while if you can do so without feeling too bad about it. If you want to be a carnivore then fine, but try to regularly include some nice leafy vegetables in your diet, and experiment with some vegetarian dishes a couple of nights a week (a couple of nights a week without meat won't kill you... although the expression on many meat-eaters' faces when I tell them this suggests that they think it might).

There are lots of other hints and tips that I could share, but this post is already approaching TL;DR territory, so I'll leave it there. If you just remember one thing them remember that establishing a regular, consistent pattern is probably the most critical thing, and the most frequent mistake. Most people treat their weekends as "responsibility-free" zones, going out and boozing all night, eating junk, not exercising, and sleeping strange hours... and then wonder why Mondays and Tuesdays are hell. It takes a little self-discipline, but keeping a regular pattern is totally worth the sense of balance and contentment it will bring to your life.

AstroSmash:
Le snip

You might be right (I'm in the UK, I don't know enough about how it's dealt with in the US to really argue with you. I know that Brits are less likely to go for any kind of treatment, so it's not the same here), but it's worth pointing out that this thread probably isn't very representative of wider society.

For starters, only a few people have claimed an actual, diagnosed, clinical depression, out of all the people that have seen the thread. This site in itself is probably a poor indicator too, considering the demographic (males, 16-30) are one of the higher risk groups for depression. Besides, not everyone's cases are going to be as severe as each others', it can be hard to express properly. I'm fairly confident there's something wrong with me beyond being a bit sad, but on the same token I'm not a suicidal wreck.

Well.... That really was depressing.

Good thing I don't date anyone, 'cause according to the game, it won't end well.

Damn.

I googled that 'Social Readjustment Scale' you mentioned as well, and I feel there were a lot of things missing from the small test it gave me. :/

AstroSmash:
Snippity snip

Thank you, AstroSmash, for dismissing those of us with mental illness as merely being drug addicts who suffer from sadness. Your empathy warms the cockles of my heart.

Turning my sarcasm off, yes, I have depression and yes, it nearly killed me. Twice.

Not from a chemical imbalance, not from hallucinations, but from my brain going "Suicide. What a good idea" and taking steps to put said idea into existence. What brought me back? The people I love. Not pills, though the scrips I've had to eat to be able to cope do make a difference and I'm grateful for them, but people. My wife, bursting into tears because I told her I was going to leave her so that when I killed myself it wouldn't hurt her as much, who insisted then and there that I get therapy right fucking now. My family and friends, who kept me sane when I lost my wife to heart failure and held my hand as I went through the nightmare of burying the woman I loved and putting my life back together afterwards.

I've always struggled with what I call my internal saboteur, a part of me that always takes a negative outlook on the world and my place in it. I deal with that voice every hour of every day, fight against it when I talk to my girlfriend or attend class for college or go to work. Hell, I had to deal with it when I played Depression Quest (and thank you, mitchell271, for linking that game to this thread). It goes well beyond "being sad"; it is a constant, unending, undercurrent of bad feeling with no reasonable cause and no reasonable solution. I can do something about it though, whether it's taking a pill or talking to someone or just taking a nap.

I live with depression, the operative word being "live". I've lost friends because of it. I've lost days and even weeks of my time dealing with it. But by gods, I'm still alive and so are a goodly number of people who would've ended their days much sooner without a pill. If that means I have a "drug problem" and I'm part of a larger shift towards chemical enslavement of the self, so bloody be it. I'll live with that, because that beats the option of dying from my mind whispering, "End it. Do yourself a favour and just end it."

Mitchell, I hope you get the help you need and want. Being willing to seek out help is the start towards something better.

Note to self, reflecting on life, bad.
According to most people I had depression since five years ago, up to April in 2012. I never really thought about it, cuz' it just felt normal, and had nothing compare it to. At any rate I guess looking back on it now I was really expressed being depressed. But I got better, but now after I played the game, I had to reflect on the last few months. Was also recently diagnosed with aspergers and said it was quite likley I'm going to fail high school. Don't know if it's a placebo affect or legit that it seems I'm about to go back down.
Suppose it's time to handle it like everything else, go forward,think later, use sarcasm.

AstroSmash:
America has a drug problem.

I'm sure you'll get that point across very succinctly with a video of Jack Nicholson telling me I can't handle the truth.

I got a good ending in the game, the character was still depressed but they were dealing with it and could live their life. Can't say I made the exact same choices, but that was limited by the game since the character found therapy helpful so he continued going while I found it a waste of time and money.

My mom is clinically depressed and it's not something you get over, but it is something you can deal with. In her case she needs happy pills. She's not struggling with it but she also knows she has to keep on her meds or her depression will become a major issue.

I have no clue if I'm depressed or not, though I think I fit more in bipolar where I have my ups and downs. Thankfully I can recognize my down-phases and know they'll pass, also known as the "get over it" mindset. A lot of people get mad when you tell them that but that helps me the most when I'm feeling the worst. If you don't feel like it will stop, make it stop. There is no fate but what you make. If you don't feel like doing it today, do it tomorrow. At least you have a goal to wake up for.

Interesting game. I got a fairly 'meh' ending, largely by answering what I'd normally do in those circumstances. I found that a little amusing, given where my depression and those sorts of choices ended-up taking me.
Anyway, makes for an interesting comparison with Actual Sunlight. Depression Quest is maybe a bit more accessible, but lacks Actual Sunlight's punch. (A note on those interested in Actual Sunlight, it is likely to prove quite difficult going especially for anyone with depression. Especially the end. Just be aware of that.)

For my own experiences, I've had depression for a little over a decade now - of a variety that's not of a similar species to what LivingContradiction describes. It.. hasn't gone very well, all things considered. My uncle also suffered from depression, but didn't make it out alive. Two of my sisters have some first-hand experience with the disease as well. As have a fair few of my friends, over the years.

TehCookie:

[line redacted]

While I understand that this has helped you, I must say that that sentence is perhaps not be the best thing to say when a lot of depressed people may be reading.

AstroSmash:

America has a drug problem.

Congratulations.

In one link and one sentence, you put up possibly the worst response possible for a thread of this type.

There's a time and place to discuss overmedication of depression, and guess where that time and place is?

Not in the middle of a goddamned depression encouragement thread.

Do you ever consider what your actions might cause? Do you ever consider the appropriateness of your actions? Have you ever wondered to yourself "Maybe this isn't a good idea, seeing how there's potentially suicidal people here, and posting a video of someone screaming "You can't handle the truth" while telling them that one of their last bastions of hope is useless and unnecessary might result in some ugly consequences"?

Do you ever consider other people beyond what your brain wants to talk about right here and now? Do you have a filter?

Actually, scratch what I said about "worst response possible".

It would be worse if you quoted this and said "yes".

I saw your edit, and I don't give a damn about it. It's a discussion that should definitely be had... ANYWHERE ELSE.

 Pages 1 2 3 NEXT

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked