Which era has the most flamboyancy?
90s
2.3% (1)
2.3% (1)
80s
67.4% (29)
67.4% (29)
70s
23.3% (10)
23.3% (10)
60s
2.3% (1)
2.3% (1)
Other
4.7% (2)
4.7% (2)
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Poll: Most flamboyant era in music?

It seems every generation has their group of musicians that put on a show not with just their songs but their behavior, their clothes, or maybe just their names. Which era do you think was the most bombastic?

Though every decade seems to have its share of flamboyance, I went with the 60s. Dem hippies man... dem hippies...

Though most of them are valid, apart from maybe our current generation which doesn't really have much, I'd have to go with the 70's Every other era definitely has it's own thing going on, but it was mainly rebellion. For flamboyancy it has to be the 70's and Glam Rock, ha ha. The 70's also had punk. That's two for the price of one!

I agree with the above poster, Glam Rock is the most flamboyant thing I've ever seen.


80s
I think I could probably find a few more if I really wanted.

The Romantic Era was easily the most flamboyant. Every era of music has been a response to the stuff that has come before. Following the Classical Era's rigidly structured music, composers of the Romantic Era went the complete opposite direction. Their music was dictated less by structure and often more by narrative. With the context of the music and the name of the piece, listeners were able to piece together what was happening in their minds, painting a mental image of the story as the music progressed.

A lot of the time, composers tried to emphasize the ideas and characteristics of the Romantic Era, such as a greater focus on nature, supernatural elements, national identity, or nostalgic portrayals of the past centuries. What resulted was a lot of music that is just all over the place, criticized for lacking in substance or meaning, but following a nonlinear train of progression that adheres to the Composer's own flights of fancy.

Take Prokofiev's Dance of the Knights for example. It starts off incredibly intimidating before making a sharp turn into an almost childlike bridge before diving back into the darkness. His work might be from the 20th Century, but it still retains a number of Romantic elements that follow the sort of organized chaos the movement was known for.

American Pop music wise; (Which seems to have become a yard stick for some reason when general terms are thrown around)
The 80s man.

Every decade has had their little quirks but when I think of flamboyancy and music in the same sense I instantly think of the over the top glory that was 80s Hair Metal.

Obviously the 80's... I mean there is no debate.

You could maybe say the early 90's.. but that was technically still the 80's as far as I'm concerned.

Soviet Heavy:
The Romantic Era was easily the most flamboyant. Every era of music has been a response to the stuff that has come before. Following the Classical Era's rigidly structured music, composers of the Romantic Era went the complete opposite direction. Their music was dictated less by structure and often more by narrative. With the context of the music and the name of the piece, listeners were able to piece together what was happening in their minds, painting a mental image of the story as the music progressed.

A lot of the time, composers tried to emphasize the ideas and characteristics of the Romantic Era, such as a greater focus on nature, supernatural elements, national identity, or nostalgic portrayals of the past centuries. What resulted was a lot of music that is just all over the place, criticized for lacking in substance or meaning, but following a nonlinear train of progression that adheres to the Composer's own flights of fancy.

Take Prokofiev's Dance of the Knights for example. It starts off incredibly intimidating before making a sharp turn into an almost childlike bridge before diving back into the darkness. His work might be from the 20th Century, but it still retains a number of Romantic elements that follow the sort of organized chaos the movement was known for.

Musically, I agree, but as to the stage performance flamboyancy, baroque opera is at least equally, if not even more insane. Maybe opera is cheating, though, given it's nature. If that is the case, the romantic era wins, with it's thousand-man orchestras and jeweled-baton conductors.

I voted 70s but it seems i listen to a lot of 80s.
I think 80s is the most wierdest.

A toss up between the 70s and 80s but I don't think any decade could beat the combined flamboyance of the glam, prog and punk groups of the 70s.

I would have to go with the 17th century baroque style.

But from your poll choices I'll say the 70s. It was mainly shown in their off stage behaviour but I think that tops names and style because they were actually living like rock stars, unlike the posing of the 80s, followed by the rejection of the 80s in the 90s (where they really just wished they were in the 70s). The 50s had class, the 60s had some style. Now? Anyone who picks that is only looking at Lady Gaga. But off stage she's perfectly normal and a saint so that's not enough.

e033x:

Soviet Heavy:
The Romantic Era was easily the most flamboyant. Every era of music has been a response to the stuff that has come before. Following the Classical Era's rigidly structured music, composers of the Romantic Era went the complete opposite direction. Their music was dictated less by structure and often more by narrative. With the context of the music and the name of the piece, listeners were able to piece together what was happening in their minds, painting a mental image of the story as the music progressed.

A lot of the time, composers tried to emphasize the ideas and characteristics of the Romantic Era, such as a greater focus on nature, supernatural elements, national identity, or nostalgic portrayals of the past centuries. What resulted was a lot of music that is just all over the place, criticized for lacking in substance or meaning, but following a nonlinear train of progression that adheres to the Composer's own flights of fancy.

Take Prokofiev's Dance of the Knights for example. It starts off incredibly intimidating before making a sharp turn into an almost childlike bridge before diving back into the darkness. His work might be from the 20th Century, but it still retains a number of Romantic elements that follow the sort of organized chaos the movement was known for.

Musically, I agree, but as to the stage performance flamboyancy, baroque opera is at least equally, if not even more insane. Maybe opera is cheating, though, given it's nature. If that is the case, the romantic era wins, with it's thousand-man orchestras and jeweled-baton conductors.

The Baroque guys were just fucking nuts, but on a more personal level. Since the Romantics were trying to counter the Classical guys, they adopted a lot of the Baroque player's madness and fused it with the Classical stuff. It was on a much larger scale then.

I would have said the late 70's to about the mid 80's. Hair Metal, Punk Rock and New Romanticism were just the tip of the iceberg, plus the Power Ballad was king.

The early 70's with golden era Bowie, Slade, and Roxy Music.

I haven't lived in either decades but from what I've heard and been told I would say the 70s. I mean come on...Donna Summers

1980s American Pop is campy and flamboyant as all hell.

The 80s easily. Any decade in which Queen wasn't popular is lesser for it. And they aren't even flamboyant by 80s standards. But by today's standards...

I was just looking for an excuse to post this again. Because you can never have enough Freddie.

 

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