Would you bring a pocket knife on a plane under the new TSA rules?
Yes
30.6% (53)
30.6% (53)
No
55.5% (96)
55.5% (96)
I would like to but don't have any suitable knives
13.9% (24)
13.9% (24)
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Poll: So the TSA is letting people carry knives on planes

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I have a Swiss knife on my keys and I never put it down and carry it always with me if i could take it on airplane i would after all i carry it on a bus, train whatever.

BiscuitTrouser:

Yopaz:

You know, most explosives are highly toxic. Consuming even small amounts could cause them to vomit blood. Yes, suicide bombers could probably take that risk because they wouldn't care about getting sick. It's not like they're planning to live it through anyway, that's true. However if they were to drink something that would make them them deadly sick and cause them to lose the skin inside their mouth don't you think that would be enough to tip us off that they are not carrying water?

Oh, you also conveniently ignored the part where I said that I wasn't saying that there was no danger danger in letting us bring water. You ignored the part where I said a knife can be used as a murder weapon, you ignored that I mentioned it can be used to make a bomb. Tell me how a knife is less dangerous than a bottle of water. Because that's the point I am trying to make here.

But some are not :3 Im pretty confident nitroglycerin isnt toxic immediately. All im saying is if they are aware the only test is to drink it thats easily bypassed.

I didnt address those because i agree. A knife is way more dangerous.

The points i disputed were these two, everything else we agreed on:

Tasting was a useful test in any way shape or form.

Testing the liquid would be easy or more efficient.

The rest isnt relevent to what i wanted to say. We agree.

x EvilErmine x:
WTF?...Why are you even bring a knife on a plain in the first place? What's that all about? What possible use would you have for a blade while on a flight?

If you absolutely need a knife where you are going then check that shit in with your luggage and and declare it with customs.

Oh and btw, anyone who says a 6cm blade isn't really that dangerous is talking out of their arse. Anything with an sharp edge can be deadly in the right hands (or should that be wrong hands?).

EDIT

It's not toxic, it's actually sometimes used to treat Angina as it can promote vasodilation and increase blood flow.

In cases of high exposure (such as industrial exposure from demolition explosive) then it can cause intense headaches, a condition known as 'bang head' lolz

Nitrglycerin is lethal in doses higher than 200mg-1200mg so it is classified as highly toxic even though it is used as heart medication. In fact a lot of medicines are highly toxic.

However I will agree that neither tasting or chemical testing are good solutions. I just find airport security in general to be stupid and that it's a step in a stupider direction when they suddenly will allow knives.

That's interesting news. What about tweasers, small scissors (eg. grooming, manicuring) and other such small sharps?

I read an awesome quote some day somewhere:

If all you need to hijack a plane is a pocket knife (or a fork, or nail clippers etc., stuff that's banned from planes)...

...Then most likely you could hijack the plane with your bare hands.

You know seriously, if some would manage a hijack just with martial arts, or technical prowess or whatever... What would they ban next? Would they only allow stupid and weak people to fly? There would be some tests on the entry and if you score more than 90 IQ points, and can lift more than 50 kgs, you'd be banned from flying?

thaluikhain:

Soviet Steve:
I was flying last summer and while in Holland I had the chance to close-read one of the posters that announced what wasn't allowed on a plane. Amongst them were catapults and ballistas. :(

Well, how would they feel if they didn't ban them, and a terrorist brought down a plane with a trebuchet?

Cap: bark ing mad

Yeah, like that.

That list doesn't seem to include Trebuchets, so the threat of Dutch airliners being taken down by medieval siege weaponry is still very real...

Let me answer that with another question; Why would I want to carry a knife on a plane?

Cases of Nitroglycerin toxicity are rare and the symptoms are generally mild. 200mg-1200mg is the estimated toxic dose and i would add that it's not a very precise estimate either as there's 1000mg of wiggle room there, that's a fair bit. Treatment for an OD is generally just to increase central fluid volume to counter the drop in blood pressure from the vasodilation. So i would argue that it's actually just mildly toxic as the definition of highly toxic would be a chemical substance that has an LD50 of equal or less than 50mg/Kg body weight.

Holy s***, really? While I can't see anyone holding up a plane with a pocketknife with any success, they could injure someone. I'm not entirely sure about the TSA's policies, but when I go on planes they don't allow fucking nail clippers, and I'd like to see all sorts of mundane but still sharp objects declared safe before knives.

Actually though, something I find hilarious whenever I go to an airport: the signs telling you what you can't bring on the plane start with "Sharp objects", and then "blunt objects", which begs the question: What manner of object ARE you allowed to bring?

This is a really bad idea, and it shows just how stupid security can be sometimes.

MeChaNiZ3D:

Actually though, something I find hilarious whenever I go to an airport: the signs telling you what you can't bring on the plane start with "Sharp objects", and then "blunt objects", which begs the question: What manner of object ARE you allowed to bring?

I guess you're only allowed to bring objects which aren't blunt, but are made of a material that can't effectively be "sharp". So you're only allowed objects which are in sharp shapes, but made out of foam.

Yopaz:

And knives can be used to stab and kill someone. With a 6cm blade I could even use it to make a bomb.

How do you make a bomb with just a knife?

thaluikhain:

Soviet Steve:
I was flying last summer and while in Holland I had the chance to close-read one of the posters that announced what wasn't allowed on a plane. Amongst them were catapults and ballistas. :(

Well, how would they feel if they didn't ban them, and a terrorist brought down a plane with a trebuchet?

Cap: bark ing mad

Yeah, like that.

someone should make a game outta that, dog-fighting planes where you use medieval siege weaponry strapped to your aircraft, maybe even some broadsword boarding action in mid-air.

awesome! Having to find a pocket knife shop every time I go somewhere with just hand luggage is annoying as hell. It's cool they're realising that knives are needed by some people and that they're really not that big of a threat on a plane anyway.

Eh, knives are only as dangerous as the people wielding them. Same for guns I suppose, though it is easier to use a gun. I'm not sure I'm alright with a bunch of excitable and generally useless people getting hero complex on a cramped aircraft because they think their 2 inch implement is a useful force multiplier, but it may help discourage future assailants from taking the chance in the first place.

I just want to point out than in most places the under six cm no fixed blade thing is how they define knives so legally they are not letting you take a knife on planes just utility blades or something. I know this quite while as I have been allowed to carry multiltools with a blade or two on them for years in school because they are not legally knive.

Yopaz:
Shouldn't the insane rulings start by removing the insane rulings rather than those who can be justified? Sure a 6cm knife wont be enough to hijack the plane or kill a lot of people, but you could stir up some hell. However a bottle of water, a tube of toothpaste, jam, perfume or moisturizer is strictly prohibited.

I might be wrong, but I don't think the problem is with those things, but rather liquid/paste/gel explosive compounds could easily be disguised as those things.

OT: Cool, I'm a habitual swiss army knife carrier. Although I'm English, and thus subject to British airport security. Damn.

Yay! I can finally carry my swiss army knife and multitool on the plane again! This makes me really happy

Binnsyboy:

Yopaz:
Shouldn't the insane rulings start by removing the insane rulings rather than those who can be justified? Sure a 6cm knife wont be enough to hijack the plane or kill a lot of people, but you could stir up some hell. However a bottle of water, a tube of toothpaste, jam, perfume or moisturizer is strictly prohibited.

I might be wrong, but I don't think the problem is with those things, but rather liquid/paste/gel explosive compounds could easily be disguised as those things.

OT: Cool, I'm a habitual swiss army knife carrier. Although I'm English, and thus subject to British airport security. Damn.

Yes it can, but a knife can pose even more of a threat, even a small one.

Duncan Belfast:

Yopaz:

And knives can be used to stab and kill someone. With a 6cm blade I could even use it to make a bomb.

How do you make a bomb with just a knife?

All it takes is a little chemistry using only the knife and things you're allowed to bring or things they actually give you on the plane. That's all I am willing to share.

I remember taking a flight with my troop when I was a kid and we all had pocket knives. But I don't really have any reason to have a pocket knife as an adult.

Yopaz:
Sure a 6cm knife wont be enough to hijack the plane or kill a lot of people

6 cm is still larger than the standard boxcutter blade. They used boxcutters to hijack planes on 9-11.

Bad example?

I know people are all hasty to try and justify less safety, but still.

derelict:
Eh, knives are only as dangerous as the people wielding them. Same for guns I suppose, though it is easier to use a gun. I'm not sure I'm alright with a bunch of excitable and generally useless people getting hero complex on a cramped aircraft because they think their 2 inch implement is a useful force multiplier, but it may help discourage future assailants from taking the chance in the first place.

This has always been one of the major reasons i have a hard time accepting the official story of what happened aboard the 9-11 flights. I mean seriously, box cutters?! Those are no more dangerous than what the TSA is now allowing with these knives. Yet i'm supposed to believe that it was enough for 6 people to overcome an entire plane full of people, let alone 2 planes. I'm not saying i'm a truther that believes the government was involved(I don't dismiss the theory either), but its just a rather hard version of events to accept.

I dunno, I'm not really much of a guy to freak out over plane takeovers and such, but I don't see why this would be allowed. You can put your pocket knife into your luggage (or can you? I remember my aunt having some problems, but that was in Austria I believe; still, point stands, just allow them in the luggage if they're not already) and I don't think it's worth changing the rule just to make life a tiny bit easier for those flying with only overhead luggage.

I'd personally just implement a thing where such knives (and any other similar objects) would be labeled and placed into a special luggage that holds such items for all the passengers that are flying with only overhead luggage and need to carry a pocket knife. Implement a tiny fee for such things and that option works for the airline company and I personally wouldn't mind paying a small amount of money for such an occasion (I carry my Swiss Army knife with me at all times too, it's on my keyring). For the frequent flyers, they could always just work that into whatever plan they have for them to not make it a constant expense.

The thing is that while such knives are not really that dangerous, anything that can cause panic on a plane is generally best avoided. That said, I'm not all that familiar with airline security on board, so if they can deal with such issues swiftly and without any problems, I guess it's fine. I'd still stick to the "chuck em all in a box and throw it in with the luggage" solution though, just seems the simplest and safest solution to me.

Dirty Hipsters:
So starting April 25th of this year (that's next week) the TSA is going to start letting people carry small pocket knives on planes again. The selection of knives you can bring is rather limited, you can only bring folding knives that have a blade length of less than 6 cm, a blade width of less than half an inch. No fixed blade knives, no molded grips, and no locking blades will be allowed on any of the knives.

Considering these rules, will any of you be taking pocket knives on board any flights in the future? If so what kind of pocket knives are you bringing?

Personally, I think it's a really dumb decision to allow knives on planes again, but considering that they are allowing it I would love to bring one (since I'm one of those people that always carries one on him anyway). Problem is, I don't have a single knife that fits all these characteristics. Most of my folding knives either have liner or frame locks, and even the ones that don't tend to have blades longer than 2.5 inches (a hair over 6cm). Even the smallest knife I have, a spyderco grasshopper, wouldn't be allowed on a plane because the blade is wider than 1/2 an inch.

edit: For those asking why someone would even NEED a knife on a plane in the first place, my response is that you don't necessarily need the knife on the plane. The thing is that many people don't like checking their bags, so they prefer to fly with nothing but carry on baggage (I'm one of those people). For those people who like to have an everyday carry knife with them it's nice to actually have the option to bring it on their trip without having to check their luggage. It has little to do with having a knife on the plane, and more to do with having their knife available to them at their destination without having to entrust the airline with their baggage.

6 cm is 2 and a third inches. Second, a knife with these characteristics isn't a knife, it's a paperweight/letter-opener. I wouldn't even use such a crappy knife to cut boxes at work.

Zachary Amaranth:

Yopaz:
Sure a 6cm knife wont be enough to hijack the plane or kill a lot of people

6 cm is still larger than the standard boxcutter blade. They used boxcutters to hijack planes on 9-11.

Bad example?

I know people are all hasty to try and justify less safety, but still.

Why thank you for quoting me entirely out of context. I know this is your thing so I am not surprised though. After spending so much time explaining why carrying a small blade can be so dangerous it's really nice to be informed that they can be dangerous.

I don't really carry a knife around, although I used to have a multitool that had one on it which I guess I would carry on to a plane if I still had it and needed it for opening bags of horrid peanuts or stabbing people who snore.

But since we are suggesting things that the TSA overlooked, what is their stance on sharpened sticks? Like super sharp and pointy ones.

A knife, no. A multi-tool with a sharpened edge attachment, sure.

Curious though, why is the length limitations given in centimetres but the width in inches?

Mine were already confiscated when I forgot they were in my bag. But this is handy. Still can't pack my toothpaste though which is much more annoying.

Aramis Night:
snip

Actually, that's the crux of the problem. Two planes full of people that essentially laid down and died on the hope that the people taking command of their lives would allow them to live despite the obvious threats of death, if they'd only listen to the raging psychotics with tiny improvised weapons.

You don't hear much about the plane that went down that was headed for the Pentagon. I guess for some reason the headline "plane passengers heroically sacrifice themselves to prevent act of mass terrorism" doesn't sound as good as "Planes hijacked and flown into the WTC."

I don't get it at all, but I suppose that's the country we live in these days.

Side note...captcha was "marry me"

...what? No, go home HAL. You're drunk.

Dr. Cakey:
Water is still classified as a deadly weapon, then?

/ok

Liquids that mix and explode are generally more worrisome than small pocket knives...

And running chemical tests to ensure that water is water is water wastes more time then it's worth. If you want water, buy some inside, or bring an empty bottle and fill it up at a damn tap, either of which is perfectly acceptable on the plane.

derelict:

Aramis Night:
snip

Actually, that's the crux of the problem. Two planes full of people that essentially laid down and died on the hope that the people taking command of their lives would allow them to live despite the obvious threats of death, if they'd only listen to the raging psychotics with tiny improvised weapons.

You don't hear much about the plane that went down that was headed for the Pentagon. I guess for some reason the headline "plane passengers heroically sacrifice themselves to prevent act of mass terrorism" doesn't sound as good as "Planes hijacked and flown into the WTC."

I don't get it at all, but I suppose that's the country we live in these days.

Side note...captcha was "marry me"

...what? No, go home HAL. You're drunk.

Wow. That was actually a really excellent point to bring up. It does speak to the motivations of the media/government that they focused more on the victimhood of the people on the planes and in the buildings to inspire fear. When they did address heroism it was more often in discussion about the first responders and very rarely about the plane where the passengers attempted to fight back.

Haven't flown ever but that's good I guess. Loosening up on the ridiculous security measures I've heard so much about.

I always carry a pocket knife on me but it's more of a tool than anything for doing random cutting at work, suppose it could do damage if I had to but that's why I have my handgun. But I doubt they'll let civilians carry handguns on planes anytime soon so pocket knife it is.

Rumpsteak:
A knife, no. A multi-tool with a sharpened edge attachment, sure.

Curious though, why is the length limitations given in centimetres but the width in inches?

I actually have no idea how the length and width limitations were determined. I wrote the length in centimeters because I think writing 2.36 inches sounds fucking stupid. The actual limitations are 2.36 inches in length (which is perfectly equal to 6cm), and 1/2 inch in width (which isn't perfectly equal to anything in centimeters). I feel like the length limitation was decided as 6cm not because they wanted to have something that's easily measured in centimeters, but rather because the average Swiss army knife has a blade length of just under 2.5 inches, and they didn't want to make it convenient for anyone to bring those on board, so they decided on a length that made those knives just barely not make the cut.

Dirty Hipsters:
**snip**

I have no need of a knife (so I voted no) but I'll be happy to be able to bring Fingernail Clippers once again.

Also, any idea if shampoo, conditioner, perfume, etc are going to be allowed again? Those tiny travel sized ones they require at the moment are a pain in the ass. I want to be able to bring actually useful amounts of hair product with me again.

Bara_no_Hime:

Dirty Hipsters:
**snip**

I have no need of a knife (so I voted no) but I'll be happy to be able to bring Fingernail Clippers once again.

Also, any idea if shampoo, conditioner, perfume, etc are going to be allowed again? Those tiny travel sized ones they require at the moment are a pain in the ass. I want to be able to bring actually useful amounts of hair product with me again.

Nope, the rules about liquids are still the same.

I lurv my multi-tool. I wouldn't be able to get through a single work-week without needing it. I keep it on me when traveling, because I know it's the kind of thing that can help me out in a tight situation. And yes, the knife on it is key to its usefulness. If it meets the TSA's requirements, this is a great thing for me.

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