Could you start over in your current/last job?
I would happily do so!
16.7% (7)
16.7% (7)
I suppose I could deal with it.
59.5% (25)
59.5% (25)
No, I'd have to find something else.
23.8% (10)
23.8% (10)
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Poll: Starting over in a job

For seven years, I worked my way up the corporate ladder from temp to peon to knowledge base and eventually to middle management. I took my job seriously and always suggested new things we could do to satisfy both employees and the big-wigs. I was even fairly well-liked, not for being a yes-man, but for shooting straight in a diplomatic manner. I talked my bosses out of bad decisions, I talked my subordinates out of quitting their jobs in favor of less severe options, I did my best.

Unfortunately, when new heads started rolling in up top, they didn't like my boss, and human nature being what it is, I was lumped in with that culture and given the ax for reasons so incomprehensible you might go Lovecraft-crazy trying to decipher the corporate doublespeak. Being a hard worker and someone with an inseparable love of food and shelter, I took another job in the exact same field, as an entry level worker. I went at it as hard as I could, but a few weeks in I realized... I couldn't do this. After all that work, I just couldn't start over. Which was unfortunate, because it was years of my life and a lot of useful experience just essentially down the drain.

So therein lies my question: Have you ever been excised from an entire field of work by being fired/laid off? If you're currently employed, could you go back to the entry level again at another place doing the same thing? Why or why not?

As someone who's only just in his 2nd week working at a movie theater, yeah, starting over wouldn't be much of a problem. My contract is about to expire and I don't know if they'll offer me to renew it. I don't know if I want to either. It's just a money thing, the job itself isn't particularly gratifying. The atmosphere is nice but it's just too damn boring and, uh, menial.

I just get to lift. I lift things here, I lift things there and I take my small paycheck home to add to the money pile.

I haven't had to restart from the bottom cause I've yet to advance. And I'm okay with that right now. I'm going to be going to school in a field that doesn't involve knowing where the chicken wire can be found. A bigger paycheck would be nice but I also know how stupid things get in management at my job so... I'll just lift. I like the exercise.

I empathize with you for being laid off (I was squeezed out of one of my earlier jobs because my boss decided she didn't like me) but I haven't climbed the ladder myself yet. I want to climb the ladder in the film industry.

And what a harsh and rickety ladder it will be...

I have spent 18 months translating a certain topic.
having to start from scratch would totally suck but I enjoy the challenges so I guess I could put up with it.
My colleague handed in her resignation notice today. I cant fathom what she will do next.

I'm in a dead-end part time job, starting over would have literally no effect on me.

Still, it's easy and satisfying when you get a nice customer so it's not too bad :D

I start my first career job in 2 weeks. I've had to put 3 years into study to get to where I am now. If for some reason I don't make it this field of work. I could restart in another but if I needed to do those 3 years again I would choose a new field to study in.

I'd have no issues starting over. Money isn't that important to me. Hell, I'm tempted to start over now. I'm not real thrilled with the way the company is going, some of the decisions they're recently made, and all the responsibility suddenly dropped on me. The main thing keeping me from starting over is I really would like to keep my car without having to refinance it.

At the moment experience is trumping qualifications so I would more than likely find myself in the same scenario if I left.

The trick is always to have a referee - preferably your direct superior - should something cause you to lose your job that was out of your control. Then again it's very difficult to fire somebody in my country unless you essentially catch them setting another staff member on fire or perhaps have two separate video feeds and witness testimony that you unloaded the cash register into your own pocket. So losing a job due to "corporate restructuring to further bring the company in line with its philosophical ideals while taking into account fiscal policy over an extended forecasted term" is not something that can happen easily.

Norithics:
If you're currently employed, could you go back to the entry level again at another place doing the same thing? Why or why not?

Could I? Yes, probably. I've been in accountancy for nearly five years and am awaiting the result of my final AAT exam, meaning I'll be qualified. If they boot me out, I've still got that qualification, and in all honesty would probably be able to get more money elsewhere for the same job.

Would I? I don't know. It's a workable skill, but while I don't hate it, it isn't exactly the profession I want to be in. It's all about the filthy lucre for me. Maybe I'd go and do something else. Then again, what I want to do is write, and other than a monthly residency on a small-but-respected gaming site I don't have any way to market that skill.

What a refreshing thread :)

I'm an oddball in that I've lived via instinct and spirit more than thought and logic most of my life when it comes to careers. Jobs were just food, shelter and beer money - the thought of owning my own home or having a family was the last thing on my mind.

I could barely hold a job down until I was 25 (I left school at 16 too) for simply being a bit of a free spirit (I lost 2 jobs for physically assaulting my bosses lol) and actually quite enjoyed being at the bottom run of the ladder as:

1) You get away with more;
2) You tend to have more fun with ground level employees as they give far less of a shit about the firm;
3) There's no pressure to change who you are because if you lose your job, another is around the corner.

But we all have to grow up sooner or later unfortunately, and I started to calm down at 25 and did similar to yourself.

But, having lived several months on the streets in my early 20's too and experiencing quite a lot, it gave me a broader perspective on work.

As shit as things may seem now, just remember that there are numerous ways of living and if you do bottom out there's always other benefits to it. For example, any smart man who has to drop on to a base level job should just find one where he can access the net and work for himself doing net-based things. Try and see the bigger picture and the opportunities and you may actually end up happier than you realize.

Essentially it's the life-package you have, not just the job alone.

So

Have you ever been excised from an entire field of work by being fired/laid off? Yep, several times.

If you're currently employed, could you go back to the entry level again at another place doing the same thing? Why or why not? No problem, there's other benefits and quite often your skills get noticed and you'll progress quickly anyway.

I was made redundant after 4 years of man-management. There are fewer management job roles and many more potential candidates if the company looks outside of their industry for management skills. I moved to a much smaller company - back in the field - back on the front line. It kept my eye in and allowed me to pay the mortgage. However, I kept looking for management roles and, eventually, an opportunity came up to start a new team in a small company - which I took with both hands.

Have a think about joining a smaller/larger organisation. Smaller ones pay less, but give you more influence and more opportunity to stick your thumb into many pies at once. It's exciting and risky. Larger companies have better pay and benefits, but you are seldom encouraged to get stuck into areas outside of your expertise.

Good luck.

Norithics:
...excised from an entire field of work by being fired/laid off?

There's a difference between being fired and being laid off. I was once fired from a technical support position and that kept me from finding gainful employment in that role for nearly a decade. Whereas I was laid off from a data processing position and was able to find employment in that field within the next month.

If you have seven years experience and were laid off, you shouldn't have much trouble finding something in your field that isn't a "ground-floor" position.

But if you were fired, yeah, might look into different areas. Maybe even consider going back to school and picking up a new degree.

Norithics:

So therein lies my question: Have you ever been excised from an entire field of work by being fired/laid off? If you're currently employed, could you go back to the entry level again at another place doing the same thing? Why or why not?

With 7 years of experience I would hope to be able to find something closer to my most recent role - experience generally counts for something, so I have a hard time imagining starting over from the bottom without good reason (moving into a different industry or a different country where only local experience is valued).

That said, I would do it if I didn't have any other options - you have to make a living somehow, after all!

I've spent seven years stepping sideways. I've made no advancement.

I "start over" fairly often, actually.

I wonder what it's like to have a job with actual advancement potential.

lacktheknack:
I've spent seven years stepping sideways. I've made no advancement.

I "start over" fairly often, actually.

I wonder what it's like to have a job with actual advancement potential.

When You find out let me know

I've finally managed to start a small video game studio with two mates and the idea of starting over is great. we'll do it with every new project!

My other jobs have never been so glamorous. I'm an actor mainly so I've always looked for the crap jobs that people complain are ruining the economy. the term zero hour contract springs to mind...

I've never actually wanted to join a corporate structure and work my way to management. I only want to make more money and have more challenging projects doing exactly what I've been doing.

Self employment! It's the way to go for me.

Norithics:
For seven years, I worked my way up the corporate ladder from temp to peon to knowledge base and eventually to middle management. I took my job seriously and always suggested new things we could do to satisfy both employees and the big-wigs. I was even fairly well-liked, not for being a yes-man, but for shooting straight in a diplomatic manner. I talked my bosses out of bad decisions, I talked my subordinates out of quitting their jobs in favor of less severe options, I did my best.

Unfortunately, when new heads started rolling in up top, they didn't like my boss, and human nature being what it is, I was lumped in with that culture and given the ax for reasons so incomprehensible you might go Lovecraft-crazy trying to decipher the corporate doublespeak. Being a hard worker and someone with an inseparable love of food and shelter, I took another job in the exact same field, as an entry level worker. I went at it as hard as I could, but a few weeks in I realized... I couldn't do this. After all that work, I just couldn't start over. Which was unfortunate, because it was years of my life and a lot of useful experience just essentially down the drain.

So therein lies my question: Have you ever been excised from an entire field of work by being fired/laid off? If you're currently employed, could you go back to the entry level again at another place doing the same thing? Why or why not?

Why don't you apply for a higher position? You obviously have the experience .

OT: I personally couldn't start over . In that situation i would a) try yo apply for a job close to what i was doing before , or b) apply for a different job that could use some of the skills i picked up in the former job.

I'm still studying, so I haven't had the chance to experience the marvels of corporate restructuring. But I've known quite a few people who have had to go through that process, and it seems to be really destructive on their self-confidence. I think it's quite rough on them, since they're all baby boomers and easily spent 20-30 years in their previous jobs. Makes me think it's better to never stay anywhere for too long, since everybody either seems to fall to the profit incentive or to internal politics (like yourself). Still, at least you have a job for now, just keep looking for what you want at the same time. Or, like krazykidd said, apply higher. From what i've heard, companies are more likely to promote from within (it's a lot cheaper for them).
Good luck.

Johnny Novgorod:
As someone who's only just in his 2nd week working at a movie theater, yeah, starting over wouldn't be much of a problem. My contract is about to expire and I don't know if they'll offer me to renew it. I don't know if I want to either. It's just a money thing, the job itself isn't particularly gratifying. The atmosphere is nice but it's just too damn boring and, uh, menial.

Money is better than no money bro.

OT: I'm on like week 4 of working in a bakery chain, so yeah probably without much hassle. I've never managed to work my way up anywhere so y'know, not a big deal.

At this point in my life I'm past caring so long as there's money.

 

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