What's the most boring book you've ever read?

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Great Gasby was definitely not a fun read, but Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky wins this topic for me. There was some interest during the actual crime, but that was pretty much it. Before and after that it felt like I was chipping away at a giant mountain of useless, boring words that made me tired from the effort it took me to get through a chapter. There were many times I would "cheat" by skipping a page or two, feel guilty and go back to reread them only to find I missed absolutely nothing important or relevant, much less anything even close to interesting. It eventually came to the point where I was like 4/5 done with the book and became absolutely sick of it, I would rather watch paint dry then read another completely boring page.

I dont remember the authors, but it was a book called "The Elves".

Christ, i cant remember when i was bored more and hated the characters with more passion. Yes, Elves are beatiful and arrogant, but you can overdo even that. The writer actually managed to make me hate the two protagonists promptly after introducing them. They are constant dicks to everyone around them, i found the human characters to be a lot more interesting. But they only serve to showcase how "AWSUM" the two Elves are.

Then, there was one from...Markus Heitz i believe, who is my favorite Author of all time. He amde a series of books about "Albae", who are pretty much the Dark Elves from Warhammer. I really liked the first book, but at the ending, and then the two sequels, it just died down for me. The drama felt shoehorned in horribly, and i felt like the guy was just throwing in tragedy all over the place to create tension. Yes, some drama is good, so to keep me hooked. But if i want to severely depress myself, i might as well go back to play League of Legends.

Brian Tams:
Fucking Eragon. Christopher Paolini is, and will always be, male Stephenie Meyer. The dude just can't write.

The book is about 400ish pages, and about half of that is stuffed full of useless fucking shit like "Eragon made dinner. Eragon sat down at the table. Eragon ate dinner."

And it only gets worse in the second book, Eldest.

Pretty much. /thread.

OT: I would include Anathem by Neal Stephenson, but I can't honestly do that because I gave up after 3 paragraphs. Far too many made-up words for my taste, especially having just read Snow Crash.

Probably the most tedious book I've read is some science fiction book I read in high school. I can't remember the title or the author, but I can remember it pitted a matriarchal empire with a focus on psychic powers against a patriarchal empire that strove for physical perfection. It was preachy as hell and I think the two leaders fucked at some point and it was terrible.

soren7550:

lacktheknack:

Glongpre:
Life of Pi. I can't even explain what happens except that there was a tiger. And he was on a boat...

Life of Pi is wonderful... ;___;

OT: "Night", by Elie Wiesel.

Don't get me wrong, it's a very important book. It's written competently, it's interesting (in the same way as a train wreck), and its subject, an unflinching stare at the atrocities of the Holocaust, is a very tragic and important one indeed.

But I felt sick reading it, had to force myself to finish, and I will never read it again.

Everyone should read it once... and only once.

OP asked about boring books that we've read start to finish, not books that made us uncomfortable/sick/whatever.

I'm not so masochistic that I've ever finished a book that bored me, so I had to go with the next best thing. :D

I think around the 7th grade I had to read The Giver
No. Nonononononononono I could not stand the writing, I could not stand the plot, I could not stand the characters, the setting, the tone, and the worse part was the audio book that my English teacher played to go with it cause I guess he found a way to make the book an even worse experience. I. TOOK. MY. SHIRT. OFF. AND. THE. OLD. MAN. PLACED. HIS. HAND. ON. MY. BACK. And he groveled at then end of each word. ONeeeeegghhh. MYeeeeegggh. BACKeeeeeggggghhh.

Also the ending where our "touched by an old man" protagonist left the utopia only to maybe die was so vague and disappointing I complained about it for a week, I wasn't the only one (Yay for shared hatred! Brings friends together).

L'etranger.

Father dies, minutia, then he gets arrested and hung. I had to read it for a class, what could I do.

A book someone got for me because they thought I'd like it was Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, I read the first chapter and stopped because fuck this garbage.

warm bodies

it was just so god damn formulic and safe and nothing made sense. none of the characters explain their decisions in a way that we might see what the hell is going on inside their head and the ending is just......good graces that was dumb.

I think Ethan Frome was easily the most boring book I'd ever read. It's about a guy, who wants to cheat on his wife with her cousin, but doesn't, and then rides a sled into a tree with said would-be-mistress. Ultimately the guy's wife has to take care of them because they end up crippled as a result of crashing into the tree. Also at one point a dish broke. That was quite literally everything that happened.

RandallJohn:
I'll probably draw heat for this, but I loathe "The Eye of the World." I hated most of the characters, I hated the repetitive storyline, I hated the tangents it went on... I realized I wasn't going to like it about halfway through, but when I start a book I just have to finish it.

While I like the series I understand your dislike of the book. Most of the books are people walking from place to place and every character thinking the other characters are idiots who do not understand the same things they do.

OT: I hated both the Left Behind books and most Stephen King novels in general. I find them extremely boring with no real suspense or emotional weight.

One I just got done reading was a book called Ghosts of Manhattan I kept reading it hoping that the main idea of the book, think post-WWI steam-punk Batman, would get better but it does not. In fact the ending made want to stop reading even though I only had about 50 pages left.

Easton Dark:
L'etranger.

Father dies, minutia, then he gets arrested and hung. I had to read it for a class, what could I do.

Much as I like the idea of classes reading Albert Camus, I chose to read it, and I found it fascinating.

OT: Dracula. Bram Stoker ain't a good writer, that's for sure...

Whenever anyone asks me why I hate the Lord of the Rings films, I'm going to bring them to this thread. It's not surprising that people prefer a dumbed-down medieval action-adventure flick with all the subtlety of a sledgehammer in the face to the most impressive exercise in literary world-building the Western world has ever produced, but goddamn is it frustrating.

On topic, my vote goes to anything by Kafka, probably. It's likely that I just don't get a lot of what he was trying to do. I mean, I understand it, but it doesn't hit me in any special way. Much prefer Lovecraft for my horror fix.

I bought a copy of ayn rands "atlas shrugged" because it was what bioshock is apparently based on. Didnt realise it was a right wing greed is good type of thing, gonna try and give it a go though, though if anyone in the uk wants it ill post it to you for free as the fuckers thicker than harry potter Vii and the bible combined, and looks pretty out of place next to my collection of kesey, kerouuac, thompson and burroughs.

Kenbo Slice:
Have you ever read a book that you just had to force yourself through, whether it be for school or to see what the big deal behind the book is? If so, what was it?

Mine would have to be The Great Gatsby. I hate, hate, hate that book. It's boring and uninteresting. I didn't care for the characters at all. Thank goodness it was a short book because after a while I couldn't take it anymore.

This might be controversial round these parts but any of the Song of Ice and Fire after A Game of Thrones.

Jesus fucking christ he is a waffling moron obsessed with tits and eating and how to describe them in such mind numbing detail that I actively throw the book out of the window to add in some excitement.

Not Matt:
warm bodies

it was just so god damn formulic and safe and nothing made sense. none of the characters explain their decisions in a way that we might see what the hell is going on inside their head and the ending is just......good graces that was dumb.

Absolutely this.

I caught myself rolling my eyes at all the metaphors he crowbarred in to each chapter. A good, compelling story does not need that many metaphors. Talk about purple prose. It was just a re-telling of Romeo and Juliet to appeal to the current pop culture prominence of zombies. That is all that book was and it was mind-numbingly dull, in addition, as you say, to making fuck all sense. Luckily, the movie actually appears to be a comedic adaptation, which could have actually saved the story.

I struggled through "This Side of Paradise". It's just so bland. I know it's meant to be jam packed with subtle insight into... God knows what, but it wasn't doing it for me. I liked The Great Gatsby. It's too brief for me to generate meaningful, negative feelings for it.

What I'm taking most from this thread is how different my opinions are from a good few of the people posting here. This isn't an attempt to sound high-brow. In fact, I want to defend Twilight as being an alright book. It seems a lot of people approached it with a negative outlook (one poster read it solely so they could justify their criticism of it...) and that strikes me as being self fulfilling as if you read/watch something expecting to hate it, more often enough, being in that head space is going to yeild those results. It's worth saying that I have read a great deal more since Twilight and it suffers by comparison to a lot of other books, but I definitley enjoyed it at the time of reading it and that's surely what matters?

Tayh:
Starship Troopers.
Man, I never expected to find a case where the movie was way better than the book.
It's just a lot of talking, politics and boring patrols. There's not even a single battle against the arachnids!

I am the opposite I love the book and have re read it a dozen times at least. I dislike the movie to tears, the only parts I will watch are the battle scenes but I have to not think about the charterers as being from the book more as just a random sci-fi flick.

I have a few the most recent is Battlefied Earth. A friend gave it to me as a gift because they know I love sci-fi. I have struggled 4 or 5 times to get into it. I don't know if part of it is because Hubbard spawned scientology and I hate the book because of that or if the book is really just not interesting. There is a couple of Warhammer 40k books I have bought and put down in disappointment, mostly the Eldar themed ones but the Inquisition Wars series was the first series that I stopped midway through and couldn't force myself to read anymore of, it was like going down a helix slide into deeper and deeper crap. I donated it to the library, maybe someone else will like it.

TheKangaroos:
I struggled through "This Side of Paradise". It's just so bland. I know it's meant to be jam packed with subtle insight into... God knows what, but it wasn't doing it for me. I liked The Great Gatsby. It's too brief for me to generate meaningful, negative feelings for it.

What I'm taking most from this thread is how different my opinions are from a good few of the people posting here. This isn't an attempt to sound high-brow. In fact, I want to defend Twilight as being an alright book. It seems a lot of people approached it with a negative outlook (one poster read it solely so they could justify their criticism of it...) and that strikes me as being self fulfilling as if you read/watch something expecting to hate it, more often enough, being in that head space is going to yeild those results. It's worth saying that I have read a great deal more since Twilight and it suffers by comparison to a lot of other books, but I definitley enjoyed it at the time of reading it and that's surely what matters?

I liked Gatsby but I looked at it from the dark undertones more than others I think. I knew something bad was going to happen before I read more than a few pages in.

I can't really name one, at least one that you guys would know anything about (I had to read Hungarian realist literature in school, you see...).

For me entertainment is king, so if a book doesn't entertain me I drop it without the slightest bit of guilt. Thanks to that I really cannot name a book that bored me and wasn't compulsory reading, but those are all boring, so naming one of those would be cheating.

'Nooit meer slapen' by Dutch writer, W.F. Hermans, who is supposedly one of THE Dutch writers and this book was apparently his best work. The title roughly translates to "Never sleeping again" and focuses on a Geology student who has to do research in Lapland to gain his degree. The problem with the book is that it is a chore to read. The characters are really not that interesting and the dialogue is boring. The first 150 pages felt irrelevant to the story. the thing is that everything makes sense after you have finished the book, meaning that on a second read through, the book will probably be a lot more enjoyable to read, because then you know why all these events are important to the story.

A lot of the books cited here are from a different era and different styles of writing. Mine is a fairly modern novel; The Story of Danny Dunn by Bryce Courtney. I like Courtney, I Love The Power of One and Tandia and I also enjoyed The Potato Factory Trilogy. However OH MY GOD this book was soooooooooooooooooooo boring! I read about half of it saying to myself "it has to get good sometime!". However it didn't and I gave up.

Catcher in the Rye hands down. The protagonist was so without charm, charisma or any redeeming features I couldn't stand to read through his perspective past the hotel. How did this novel get so popular again?

I didn't read this in high school, but I decided to give it a go to see what makes it such a literary classic. I'm currently somewhere in the middle of book two of Tale Of Two Cities, so far it's such a chore to read through. I don't know why Dickens felt it was necessary to repeat things four times.

I've been fairly fortunate with the books i've read, most of them have been quite good (i know how to pick them, for now), but there was one: Cities in Flight, by some well renowned sci-fi author guy. It was way too technical and had next to no character development, just a lot of descriptions of biology and technical aspects of everything. It was quite boring, i don't read sc-fi to learn how a gravitational engine works or whatever...

In school i remember reading some story by Steen Steensen Blicher a social realistic story called "Hose Krĉmmeren" (Which is a guy who sells socks in the 1800s) It wasn't nearly as exciting as it sounds and unfortunately the 3 hour long movie was even worse...

I honestly don't get the hate for Gatsby, i read it recently and loved it and it's even a quick read (note like Cities in flight which is a billion pages of nothing...):p.

Glongpre:
Life of Pi. I can't even explain what happens except that there was a tiger. And he was on a boat...

I didn't even get that far when I read it. I watched the movie last year and thought "Well........no wonder why I didn't finish this POS". If it wasn't for the sometimes-brilliant imagery i'd call it one of the worst movies I've ever seen.

First and foremost, if it's boring i don't even get to the end of it, time is precious and I'd rather try something else:

Lord of the Rings, I tried reading it twice, the second time I got to the end of Fellowship of the Ring and began The Two Towers, and then I quit. I also ALMOST left the theater during the third movie, I couldn't get through The Hobbit at all.

Some of Anne Rice's "latest" (well, it's been a while) vamp books were pretty boring, but I surprisingly managed to get to the end.

No other books come to mind right now...

Tolkein again for me though it was The Silmarillion. Always get so far then get a bout of why am I forcing myself to read this.

All books.
I like reading news, interviews, science, factual stuff, someone even dared me to read the whole Oxford dictionary so i did, but i can't get into fictional books. Just can't translate text to pictures like people who like books claim they do, video games and movies do that for me so i can enjoy stories in those mediums, but not books.

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

It remains to date the only book I've ever read that actually physically put me to sleep.I'm not even joking.It was so boring I could never read more than ten pages without my eyes starting to close.I had to finish it as I was reading it for school but fuck me it was a chore

At first, it would have been a toss up between Fellowship of the Ring and Great Expectations. Thing is, Fellowship's problem (in my mind, at least) was the beautiful descriptions being applied to trivial things, making things very, very long when they needn't have been. But after taking a class on the series (I had to burn an elective), it became obvious that Tolkien was more a linguist than an author. Put a whole lot of things into proper context, and it was interesting to see the million little paralels in the old english works he used. Still a slow book, but if you compress the events a bit, it's not bad.

Great Expectations has even less going for it. Near the end of it (had to read it for a high school class), my brain just put it's metaphorical foot down and refused to read another word. I got ill thinking about forcing myself and when I did it anyway, the ink on the page might as well have spelled out how to summon cthulu for all the good it did. Just...complete lack of care, translation of symbol to meaning did not occur. I only got through by audio book and even that was tortuously boring. The only upside to the entire bloody thing was the Convict whose name escapes me at the moment, and that's only the case because the guy who played him in a school production was very good.

I got two:

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens. The whole book is long, full of characters and a Victorian language style that was too dense. Charles Dickens was paid by the word to write each chapter for the newspaper it first showed in. I'd like to say that a good artist is one who doesn't value money over what they make, but Dickens does not do that at all. There's too many words! So much of this writing could have been condensed down into something much shorter. Not only that, but both my mother, and my grandmother hate this novel. Why in the world was I ever assigned to read it in 9th grade?

Candid by Voltaire. What a lame book. The entire premise was supposed to be about a guy who does not care at all and is the epitome of apathy around others. He gets into a relationship, he doesn't care. He goes to jail, he doesn't care. He eats a salad, he doesn't care. Yeah, I don't think I'll ever care about this book.

The one that stands out to me as the most obnoxious on all levels was 'The Great Gatsby'. Apart from being badly paced and generally boring, I think a lot of it's (alleged) commentary is on something distinctly American and loses impact when read by an Australian.

Silas. Fucking. Marner.

Good heavens, I have never read a thing more dull in my life. If there is anything to get excited about in that book, it's how exceedingly awful every single bit of it is. Apparently, it's considered enough of a classic that it is part of literature courses. I can't see how. It goes on for pages and pages with nothing of consequence happening. Then it skips sixteen years to have more of the unlikable roles that fail to be characters do more nothing.

It's described as tackling themes of love and religion and community and all of that and as far as I could tell, no it fucking didn't that was a filthy fucking lie. Basically, the titular "character" is a hermit who accidentally ends up kidnapping a child and raising her as his own, redeeming his hermit-dom and hatefulness by completely turning it around with no actual motivation whatsoever. Then we SKIP the entire raising part (not like anything interesting happened there) to the point where her unlikable parents try to buy her back buy she decides to stay with the guy who you know fucking raised her since she was an infant are you honestly trying to buy back your abandoned child you sick freaks is anyone in this book human or are you all demons.

Needless to say, I wasn't particularly fond of it.

EDIT:

And ooh, a close second is "A Painted House" by someonewithafuckingfirstnameiforgot Grisham.

Basically, it acts like it's a coming-of-age novel, which is it's excuse for throwing nothing but pointless bullshit at us for several hundred pages all told from the perspective of an annoying, horny child. I am okay with the kind of life stories. I don't need high adventure or action or such. But if you're going to focus simply on someone's life, at least make their life remotely interesting or at least make the character remotely likable.

I like several of the books already mentioned. 1984 in particular, which I would probably call my favourite book ever! Since I seem to like boring books, trust me when I say that The Room (no relation to Tommy Wiseau's masterpiece) by Hubert Selby Jr (of Requiem for a Dream fame (sorry for the abuse of parentheses)) is the most frustrating and tedious book I've ever read. It's about a simple-minded criminal who's locked in a cell and fantasizes about revenge. The end.

Wuthering Heights. And the fact that I had to read it for school really didn't help. Nothing. freaking. HAPPENS!

Mine has to be "Buddenbrooks" by Thomas Mann. In fact it's so boring it provides a whole new experience, plunging into depths of tedium seldomly reachable otherwise. I could almost recommend it.

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