What's it like where you live?

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I'm no demographics expert, but I am under the impression that not everybody is from the same town or city or even country for that matter. Many of us have only seen a portion of the world and getting to know about other places even through the lens of another person is interesting.

So, tell us a bit about where you're from. Try to personalize it rather than making it so fact-based. If all I wanted was facts, I'd look to Wikitravel and look up wherever you live.

I currently live in Valencia, Spain. I call it "The Forgotten City". Despite it being the third largest city in Spain, it's often overlooked by tourists who leave Barcelona (the second city most tourists visit after Madrid)* just skip over it in lieu of the beaches of Alicante or the beautiful historical monuments and buildings in Seville. Even if they do see it, they stay here for a maximum of one weekend.

Personally, I love it for that exact reason. Spain is like Italy in the sense that most of the country is an enormous tourist trap. The cities that are the best for living in my opinion are ones that offer plenty of culture with a slight cosmopolitan edge to make it easier to adjust to living in Spain. Another good example of that appears to be Zaragoza from what I have heard.

After spending a week in Madrid, a month in Barcelona getting a teaching certificate, and now two weeks in Valencia searching for a job, I have committed to living in Valencia. Despite the economy, the English teaching industry still has plenty of jobs available and I've gone on one interview per day for the last 5 working days. There's no doubting the action here for a job if you have sufficient experience.

While Madrid and Barcelona are bigger cities, have way more tourist attractions, have a higher diversity of people and a booming nightlife, they are simply too large to appeal to me. In Barcelona, I was constantly bothered by the street sweepers that cut through the city at 2 or 3 AM every night. People would be screaming to each other at 5 AM after getting back from one of the countless bars in the area. Madrid is simply too large for my tastes and Barcelona is so cosmopolitan that learning Spanish would be a waste of time. If I was 5 years younger (I'm nearing 29 now), I wouldn't care as much. Like just about every big city I've lived or vacationed in, it's a nice place to visit but I wouldn't want to live there.

Like America, each province in Spain has its own culture. For example, Valencia is the birthplace of the original paella which is a combination of rice, meat (rabbit or chicken for paella valenciana, other may be used in different mixes). Many consider paella to be the national dish in Spain. I don't have any personalized food porn, but I can provide an example of what it looks like:

image

I don't eat it as much as I'd like as eating out in Spain is quite expensive (10 Euros for a full afternoon meal, more for dinner). But if made properly (in a special dish called a paellara), it'll hit the spot more often than not.

Due to dwindling funds, my job search, and inability to fly solo in social situations, I haven't socialized as much as I would like. I'll undoubtedly have more to say later should this thread take off.

*People traveling into Spain from France will often visit Barcelona first given its proximity to the southern border and work their way down from there.

What's my city like?

Well, the mentally ill just walk around town and end up being a danger to the shop workers. Nothing ever gets done about them.

One time a well renouned beggar demanded money, I said no and said he was going to rape me.

So yeah...

I live in a "small town" called Tracy, right in the middle of the state of California. I put "small town" in quotes because that is how most people describe it, despite having 250,000+ people.

It also has set up of a small town, that is: entertainment is limited to one theater and one bar, and then houses. Just lots of houses. Also a random High-Speed rail station that cost over $10 million to build, yet doesn't have any rails or trains within a mile radius.

The food here is mostly major chains, but there are a few good local places. Right across from the school I go to there is a place that serves the a full 1 pound of the best burrito in existence for $2, and only 75 cents to get a horchata with it. It is so good that it is constantly at three times the limit of people in the building demanded by the fire marshal and the flies have declared it their favorite place to hang out, too.

As for the chillax surfer dudes associated with California, I can confirm that those do not exist. The water flows straight from the north pole all year, so the water in Southern CA can be as cold as southern Alaska. The only people that go in the water are hardcore surfers that hate everyone that walks on the beach because they are amateurs. Also, they get to eat $100 sushi dishes every day on welfare. It only takes 3 hours too get to the beach from here, too.

As for stuff in nearby towns, there is Oakland, which holds two sports teams and the highest murder, mugging, theft, assault, and rape rates in California. (If you go there you will get mugged. One of my friends got stabbed with a potato peeler for his left shoe while he was there, no joke). Also police there get minimum wage, which happens to be less than thee infinite amount of welfare you can get.

Now to get to the one, ONE[1] thing that makes it worth it to live here. San Fran-fucking-cisco. Everyone gets along, everyone is chill with whatever you do as long as it doesn't hurt anyone, and Chinatown district is a great place to go if I feel like buying some awesome bladed weapons, food poisoning, and high-powered fireworks. Priced ridiculously high for tourists who don't understand the concept of haggling.

[1] besides burritos, that part should be obvious.

I live in Stockholm, Sweden. Venice and capital of Scandinavia or some bullshit.
It's quite divided. Inner city is populated by snobs, outskirts border on hillbilly territory and in the middle section where I live it's like most middle-class towns. Mainly apartment buildings, some sections with only houses and some with terraced houses.

It's quite nicely linked togeather compared to the majority of other cities I've visited in Sweden. In other towns it feels more like they have one shopping centre and then a few houses scattered here and there. I've only been through about 1/3 of Sweden though, so I can't speak for it all.

Uuuh, personalized... Well, there's gypsy beggars fucking everywhere. Tons of junkies and homeless in the inner city and we also released all our mentally ill people into the wild a while ago because we closed our mental hospitals for some reason. Plenty of those where I live. While they aren't the dangerous type they can be really fucking annoying. Had some lady who always tried to pick a fight whenever she saw me. Think most of them have died off without proper aid though. For the past five years I've only seen one of them.
Not that many restaurants in my close area, but plenty of bars to supply the vast amount of alcoholics that live here.

The inner city is always full of people. During the weekends you can hardly move around in the streets. You get used to it quite quickly, and learn which alternative routes you can take, but during the summers it's really packed.

Really not sure what else there is to say. While not exactly the biggest fan I wouldn't wanna move anywhere else. I've lived in this big city all my life and being stuck in a smaller town would probably feel really weird to me.
Pretty sure this is an issue in all major cities however.

Feel free to ask questions if anyone wants specifics. Easier to answer that than trying to summorize this place tbh. :P

My hometown in Chippenham, Wiltshire (Although I move all over the place with the military now.)

It was a good place to grow up, safe and local, but I can't say I miss it a whole too much!

I'm from a village in the middle of England between Nottingham and Sheffield. It's a picture-esq place with some wonderful countryside; beautiful in the summer and full of character. It's also near enough to bigger towns & cities so that there's plenty to do.

The problem is the people - they are mostly utter mongs. There's a minority that are OK, but they lack basic intelligence and are mostly sleepwalking drones, brainwashed by society and it's media, and caring more about who shagged who on TV soaps such as EastEnders rather than doing anything with their lives.

Single mums are everywhere, wannabee-gansgters strut around embarrassingly, and nearly every company I've worked for is run by total and utter idiots who lack basic common sense, and make blatantly bad one-step-logic decisions all the time, despite their previous million decisions using the same approach falling flat on their arse.

I'd always like to have a place here and it'll be a nice place to retire aged 60+ when I could just be an ignorant old man enjoying a pint with his mates in the pub after their life-draining wives have left them or passed on. But it'd be very bloody nice if in the 30 years leading up to then I could land some serious dollar, and buy a place somewhere more exotic/tropical, with more culture and less village idiots.

SuperUberBob:
SNIP

I've visited Spain several times but always typical coastal holidays like Magaluf or Solou, so I'm gonna try and do Barcelona next year. You've perked my interest with Valencia now though - is it worth a visit as a tourist?

I'd probably take in a football match, but Valencia need to get their act together! lol

It's not ideal. It's hot and humid all the fucking time, the roads are shitty, parking is a nightmare ANYWHERE, there's a lot of people who aren't really proficient in English, everything is expensive, and the radio stations all suck.

I was not meant to live in Hawaii. I don't get the appeal.

Well here is the lovely view outside my bedroom window, taken last Saturday morning:

But in all seriousness, I love where I live (Bath, UK). It can get a bit hilly going into the city centre but pretty much everything I need is at the top of the hill. This also makes cycling to the university really easy, as it's only a couple of miles and basically flat. It can get a bit expensive eating out/drinking but I never do that. What you're left with is a beautiful world heritage site surrounded by some of the nicest countryside in the UK.

I live in Amsterdam now. It's a great city, but mostly people come to see it for, as I chose to put it, "Pot and Pussy". It's rather tiresome.

Where I live, its damp, grey, rains alot and nothing or no-one ever changes.
I live in a rural part of County Tyrone, N. /Ireland. The closest town has a population of 610 people. And the best way to describe said town is by a quote for Obi Wan Kenobi... "You will never find a more retched hive of scum and villainy" haha.
In the surrounding area (20 mile radius) there isn't very much to see or do. Belfast would seem to get the maority of the tourism for the North of Ireland and the North coast have some good views and attractions. There are parts of Tyrone and the North that have some great potential to attract tourism and even its local people, but the effort to promote such areas and beauty spots has fallen short. Northern Ireland really does not live up to its potential.
The South/Republic of Ireland on the other hand has amazing scenery, attractions and the most wonderful people. The restaurants on the West coast (namely Kerry, Clare and Galway) are fantastic. The people are amazing friendly and kind.

All of Ireland North and South can be pretty amazing at times and sometimes can take its toll on the population. It is a beautiful place though for the most part some of its more beautiful visions are hidden and rarely publicised.

One misconception that I have found especially with tourists or those not native to Ireland is how they believed before they visited that it was an extreme dangerous country, How the troubles are still very much active and how the people from either religious background are or would be hostile to anyone from the opposite backgroud.
Though this may have been the case 20 Years ago, time has moved on. From my point of view Northern ireland is no more a threat or dangerous to anyone. The times have changed and the majority of the population have dealt with the past and moved on for a brighter more intergrated future. Like any country, you have your crazies, and dangerous people, but we certainly do not have as many as what is believed by the outside world. The chance of being shot or blown up here are no higher than in any other park of the uk, Europe or Usa.

For the most part Tyrone and northern ireland as a whole is ok to live in, a bit boring, but thats all. It has wonderful potential to be even more popular, but that has somehow not been taken advantage of as yet.

I live in a little Dutch town called Woerden. It's small (~35000 inhabitants) and quiet. It is said to be the most average town in the Netherlands, in terms of demographics. It's a rural area, surrounded by the typical completely flat Dutch farmlands. The area it's in is called "The Green Heart", because it's a large connected rural area right between the four largest cities in the Netherlands. Woerden does have a long history. It was founded as a Roman border town almost 2000 years ago and still archeologists find new objects from that time, most importantly several river ships.

There's really not much to do in my town (there's the yearly cow market with lots of festivities around it, but very little else), but luckily it's close to cities like Amsterdam, Rotterdam, The Hague and Utrecht, and has very good public transport connections. :)

I live in rural Oxfordshire in the UK. It is raining at the moment, the field outside my window is green with sheep scattered over it. I am surrounded by trees and yet the horizon is broad and the sky big and bright (if overcast).

This is a traditional English village with two churches, a pub and a postbox. It is home to 200 households. The nearest big city is Oxford, which is 20-30 miles away. Part of the village is 17th and 18th century stone farm houses, pretty thatched cottages or conversions of the former old schoolhouse - all with massive landscaped and manicured gardens, the other half is council houses from the 1950s - many of which have been extended. The population is part people wealthy enough to have escaped city life, but still need to commute - and part aging natives whose family has been here for fifteen generations. We have regular power cuts lasting for hours, no mains gas (most people use oil) and broadband is rubbish (the nearest exchange is 7km away).

It's nice and quiet here. I can hear the birds singing. You need transport to get anywhere. Everyone knows you and what you're up to. However, we're almost totally isolated from news outside of the immediate area.

Pretty shit really. I feel like I'm the only English person in my town right now, everyone else is either Polish, Latvian or chav.

I live in Guildford, Surrey(County), England. It's a small city south of London. It's green and pretty but quite boring. I'm here mainly for work as there's a big game development community in Guildford. That's probably the thing I like most about the city, when you go out for lunch you can see games people everywhere.

There's countryside all around the city but it's only 30 minutes on the train to London so it doesn't feel very isolated. There's a big university here so on some nights there are a lot of students out in the town.

Here is an image of the high street (not my own). The office where I work is less than 5 minutes from here and I walk down this road every morning and every evening.

Well, this seems like fun!

I am from a gorgeous city in the United States known as Denver, residing in the state of Colorado.

This place is by no means small, though we still try to keep small town attitudes. Which is most likely why we are ranked the second happiest state in the US. That or the fact that we have over 280 days of sunshine per year!

We are blessed enough to have 7 professional sports teams, covering everything from Lacrosse, both types of football, and even rugby. Though by far the Denver Broncos bring us the most attention.

I love it here for far too many reasons to name. For one, there is always something to do on any given night. We house a gorgeous theater where I have watched some of the greatest theatrical productions of my lifetime. There is a thriving bar and club scene which is certainly responsible for some of the best, and worst, memories of my twenties. And as stated earlier, pick a sporting event... I promise you can find a game.

The fallout that the US Economy experienced seemed to skip us, and over all our economy held out fine. As such, there is a large influx of individuals from surrounding states coming into the city looking for work. This at times has led to tension, but all in all, it has just seemed to introduce me to new and interesting folks.

But honestly, if you really want to know why I love this place. It is because Skyrim is my backyard...

and

I love the mountains like a mistress. When it comes to poetry, they are my muse. Every spare second I have I flee to the shadows of towering Aspens and Evergreens. I sleep alongside peaceful mountain run offs, quietly slip my way through canyons and valleys filled with Elk. When the world of steel and concrete bids me to return, it is always with regret that I do so.

Yet the mountains can be our biggest adversary as well. We just finished up a horrendous stretch of rain, that led to one of the worst floods we have had in over 100 years. I believe it even made international news. The foothills were utterly devastated, entire towns being wiped off the map. Currently there are still 1,000 people unaccounted for. But, we take that in stride. To live so close to nature, you have to expect a bit unpredictability and danger. It is the way of the west, and a source of our pride.



Really there is not too much else to say. We work, we laugh, and we play. We are passionate about life out here I guess. After all, sometimes it is better to just...

Kaendris:
SNIP

Are you some type of tourist operator for Denver? Because I'm sold! lol Wow, it looks and sounds great.

What's the music scene and women like?

Esotera:
Well here is the lovely view outside my bedroom window, taken last Saturday morning:

But in all seriousness, I love where I live (Bath, UK). It can get a bit hilly going into the city centre but pretty much everything I need is at the top of the hill. This also makes cycling to the university really easy, as it's only a couple of miles and basically flat. It can get a bit expensive eating out/drinking but I never do that. What you're left with is a beautiful world heritage site surrounded by some of the nicest countryside in the UK.

As a Chippenham lad... I agree with you so much!

Bath is one of my favourite cities in the world! It is such a nice place! We always take visitors there, especially foreign visitors, because it is that nice a place!

Well, Belfast is a pretty small, quiet city, so not much interesting happens. It's very insular and people tend to mind their own business, since I live close to the centre I often hear the parades beating their dead horses, which is a good time for people to stay in to avoid drunken violence and frankly unimpressive visuals.

There's still a bit of that ridiculous divide between two barely-different Religions, you know the one.

But yeah, we don't have much ethnic diversity, here, but it starts to increase as you get in towards the centre of the city. Especially around the Students Union. In the Summer, we even have our own wee 'Con take place down there.

I'm not complaining (about this aspect, at least). This place is quite comfy to live in for a shut-in like me.

Yaaaay. Belfast. What nice, reasonable people. This was over a flag coming down, by the way. A bloody flag.

Elementary - Dear Watson:

As a Chippenham lad... I agree with you so much!

Bath is one of my favourite cities in the world! It is such a nice place! We always take visitors there, especially foreign visitors, because it is that nice a place!

I think the surrounding area is definitely one of the best places in the UK, you've got the Mendips, the Quantocks, and the Somerset Levels all within a pretty small area. Can't say I've been to Chippenham apart from passing through the train station, but from what I saw it looked nice!

SpunkeyMonkey:
What's the music scene and women like?

Well, we are home to one of the prettiest natural amphitheaters I have ever had the pleasure of catching a show at. Any concert worth going to is done here. Red Rocks.



Everything from Global Music Festival to Bluegrass plays there. So music in Denver is incredibly deverse. Matter of fact, the "underground" scene is pretty popular, though it tends to be mainly heavy grunge and metal music. The Fray came out of Denver, and the music scene sort of exploded afterwards. But come on, in a city where you can find everything from poetry readings to seedy watering holes, I promise you, your type of music is represented.

As for the women... well. I do not think you would be dissapointed. We are currently ranked 14 in the US "prettiest people" poll.

Did I mention we also have quite a few Micro-Breweries?

The woods, USA. : p

Middle (more or less) of the country, just west of Appalachia. It's a kind of weird inbetween from the "Texan southerner" and "DEEP south southerner".

Lots of trees, and grass. Ticks and chiggers in the spring, cicadas and toads in the summer, and not much snow in the winter. Which makes me sad. People in general aren't the most forward thinking lot, but most of them are nice folk, even when they encounter something they don't understand.

Esotera:
Well here is the lovely view outside my bedroom window, taken last Saturday morning:

But in all seriousness, I love where I live (Bath, UK). It can get a bit hilly going into the city centre but pretty much everything I need is at the top of the hill. This also makes cycling to the university really easy, as it's only a couple of miles and basically flat. It can get a bit expensive eating out/drinking but I never do that. What you're left with is a beautiful world heritage site surrounded by some of the nicest countryside in the UK.

I can see my house in your 2nd picture :) Whats amazing is that Bath is only so big, so there is a decent chance we have passed each other at some point :D

It's an amazing city to grow up in although it has chnaged alot in the last 15 years since the universities expanded and alot of the residential areas I grew up in have become student only areas. We do have the best pub in the world though, so I suppose it balences out :)

piinyouri:
The woods, USA. : p

Middle (more or less) of the country, just west of Appalachia. It's a kind of weird inbetween from the "Texan southerner" and "DEEP south southerner".

Lots of trees, and grass. Ticks and chiggers in the spring, cicadas and toads in the summer, and not much snow in the winter. Which makes me sad. People in general aren't the most forward thinking lot, but most of them are nice folk, even when they encounter something they don't understand.

Heh, reminds me of Kirbyville, Texas. Out on the eastern side of the state, bout 2 hours north of Beaumont. I lived out there for a stretch of my childhood. Ended up being raised on stories of Bigfoot and haunted wheat fields. Then again, I learned a lot about whiskey, southern values, fishing and fires.

I miss the Big Thicket sometimes...

I'll put it this way. There are about 20 pubs in my small town. There aren't any McDonalds, KFCs or even Subways. There are about 10 antique shops. We have a small cinema which doubles as a church.

Not exactly built for my age group. And I kind of like it that way.

Kolby Jack:
It's not ideal. It's hot and humid all the fucking time, the roads are shitty, parking is a nightmare ANYWHERE, there's a lot of people who aren't really proficient in English, everything is expensive, and the radio stations all suck.

I was not meant to live in Hawaii. I don't get the appeal.

Admittedly that was one thing that did suck when I went to Hawaii. The radio. We got some hits of the 60s, 70s and 80s station from another island I think, but only got signal on one strip of road. The rest was utter shite.

Esotera:
Well here is the lovely view outside my bedroom window, taken last Saturday morning:

But in all seriousness, I love where I live (Bath, UK). It can get a bit hilly going into the city centre but pretty much everything I need is at the top of the hill. This also makes cycling to the university really easy, as it's only a couple of miles and basically flat. It can get a bit expensive eating out/drinking but I never do that. What you're left with is a beautiful world heritage site surrounded by some of the nicest countryside in the UK.

Good lord! That second pic looks like something out of a Stronghold game!
I've never seen something look so placid and idyllic that wasn't in some sort of entertainment media.
I want to live there. ;-;

I'm from Lincolnshire in England, in a small village called Swineshead. A place that used to be pretty from. There was always something going on somewhere, a game of football, an opportunity to go out in town, even just a nice country walk with the dogs.

Now? There isn't so much to do. I used to be patiently waiting for the weekend to swing by the local venue and watch bands and party with friends, and now, Friday and Saturday are days entirely dedicated to Warhammer. Not that I'm complaining, it's just disappointing.

The areas nice, quiet, and there're fields EVERYWHERE so it isn't too hard to think of something to do, but I lived in Scotland before and that was waaaaay better for being out in the country.

I Live in Leicester, England. Its going to be, or now is not sure, the first city in the UK to have a majority non white British population and is pretty unique place to live in the UK. Its known for a very large Indian population, the largest concentration of Indians outside of India I believe and has some of the best curry houses in the world. The streets where I live boast the latest range of Bollywood fashions and so many gold jewelers that the nickname for the road I used to live on is "The golden mile". There are many temples and places of worship, some of them decorated and fashioned to look quite beautiful. During the festival of lights or Diwali as it is called the golden mile is closed to vehicles and literally thousands of Indians will walk up and down this road packed so close they are practically touching with music playing and lights flashing, people set up food stalls and hand it out to people walking past (mmmmmmmm... free) and generally have a good time.

Much nicer than my old home, a place called Scunthorpe, the only British city to have a foul word hidden in the name and now has its own TV series called Skint, about how poor, deprived and generally shit the place is.

To put it shortly, my city feels like a bunch of country folk coming together trying to play it like they are city folk. on the outside it may look like its great, but when you look deeper they still countrymen.
Especially this can be seen when new studies season start as people come from everywhere to study here, and since they never been here get drunk and start sexual harrasment.

piinyouri:

Esotera:
Well here is the lovely view outside my bedroom window, taken last Saturday morning:

But in all seriousness, I love where I live (Bath, UK). It can get a bit hilly going into the city centre but pretty much everything I need is at the top of the hill. This also makes cycling to the university really easy, as it's only a couple of miles and basically flat. It can get a bit expensive eating out/drinking but I never do that. What you're left with is a beautiful world heritage site surrounded by some of the nicest countryside in the UK.

Good lord! That second pic looks like something out of a Stronghold game!
I've never seen something look so placid and idyllic that wasn't in some sort of entertainment media.
I want to live there. ;-;

You should see it in early summer just before sunset, as you come in from the north the sunlight reflects off the sandstone buildings and it looks like the city is on fire :)

My current city of residence is Perth the state capital of Western Australia. It's quite a pretty city, situated on the Swan River. I really enjoy living here even though I'm more of a regional-urban guy. However since it is Australia, everything is INSANELY EXPENSIVE. Also there isn't really a lot to do here when compared to the bigger cities of Melbourne and Sydney.

There is a wide variety of different races and cultures here (immigrant society) with the majority being of European descent (although the Asian contingent is quite large).

I live in Targu Mures, Romania. It's a good place, I guess... it's typically Eastern Europe, the people make little money here, so a lot of stuff you need for daily life is cheaper than anywhere else, a lot of stuff is mode expensive. Internet is really awesome, it is in the top 15 worldwide, according to speedtest, and indeed, 100 mbit seems to be everywhere, they throw it in your face for 12$ with free 3G (we don't have any 4g ... yet). The sights are beyond beautiful, the historical monuments are really worthy to see. It's just the people that suffer, everything mostly. I used to live in a much smaller city, where mostly everyone knew each other. Aaand, we mostly get a bad rep from people because they think, that we are Eastern Europe scum. Communism haven't been too good for this country, indeed, after 21 years, it is still being felt in peoples' mentality and demeanor. Local television and entertainment is mostly crap.

The positivity? Incredibly good, organic and homegrown food, that you can buy at almost everywhere, at least in smaller cities, so we can be really hipster about that, at least. Other than that, we have the world's best driving road, according to Top Gear.

SuperUberBob:

I currently live in Valencia, Spain. I call it "The Forgotten City". Despite it being the third largest city in Spain, it's often overlooked by tourists who leave Barcelona (the second city most tourists visit after Madrid)* just skip over it in lieu of the beaches of Alicante or the beautiful historical monuments and buildings in Seville. Even if they do see it, they stay here for a maximum of one weekend.

Thanks to the El Cid campaign in Age of Empires 2, Valencia is one of the few Iberian cities I know anything about. Should I ever get to south-east Spain, I'm certainly going for a visit.

I live in a small town with a population of around 4,000 with uni students in mid-Wales, though on Friday I'll be moving up to Aberytwyth, another Welsh town, but this time with a population of 25,000 including student for the start of my university life. As small towns go, it's alright, if a bit isolated. Amazon has been a lifesaver.

Well, I live in the Eastern Suburbs about an hour out of Melbourne, Australia.
Whether is a bitch here. Melbourne whether is 4 seasons in one day, or one really extreme season if you're not lucky. Days go from sunny to rainy to both in a matter of hours at times. Its a generally warm place, with temperatures having dropped below 0' during winter maybe three times in the last few years, and in summer it gets to over 40 quite easily [Obviously celsius temperatures], which makes the hour drive to Phillip Island for surfing and sailing worth it, as well as the pool in the backyard.
The area that I live is one of the nice estates of the suburb, which is a mildly respectable suburb. It has some nice estates, but its right next to several suburbs that have rather poor reputations. Police used to patrol the high school here 'cause of bad behaviour, our neighbouring suburbs are the places you're told not to travel alone through, and never at night, and the people from such places generally end up flooding our local shopping centres, which drags the suburbs reputation down a bit.
Outside of that there's not much to say about the suburbs. Its general suburb life. Not a lot of culture 'cause the houses have been around maybe 20 years, no major tourist attractions, just plain, ordinary houses and people. I guess I could go into the 'Australian way of life' or W/E, but that's not really relevant as everyone here is different. We've got the heavy racists and xenophobes, we've got your stereotypical old men who cook a barbie and drink beers on the veranda, less than an hour away there's friends of mine who live and work on farms, we've got the rich upperclass snobs, and those who have money but don't flaunt it or do much with it. Religion really isn't a major player, at least around here, with anyone who does believe having the common sense not to try and convert those who don't, and not treating the bible like its a true historical text, but instead working off the messages it teaches and believing in god. People like that around here are, more often than not, either of Italian descent, grandparents, or people who've moved here from overseas, with most other people simply not believing, and not even caring about religion in general. Of course there are exceptions, and elsewhere in the country things are very different.
The neighbourhoods I've lived in have been kind of close, but not really. We all know each other, we all talk occasionally, and when door knockers come around, a call goes out so we all know to pretend we're not home, but we generally keep to ourselves and don't interact a lot. BBQs that are hosted are generally either because its dinner time, and people are hungry and have meat to cook on a BBQ, and just turn into a normal family dinner with no guests, or between close family and friends who get invited over for some special occasion. There is one family in the street who does host BBQ parties for the street a couple of times a year, but they're generally the exception.

drummodino:
Also there isn't really a lot to do here when compared to the bigger cities of Melbourne and Sydney.

Hehe, I wouldn't say there's a ton to do here either really. Sydney has most of it, or Brisbane thanks to its proximity to the Gold Coast.
Could just be 'cause I'm a local and don't really look at any of that touristy crap here though.

Fimbulvetr3822:

I can see my house in your 2nd picture :) Whats amazing is that Bath is only so big, so there is a decent chance we have passed each other at some point :D

It's an amazing city to grow up in although it has chnaged alot in the last 15 years since the universities expanded and alot of the residential areas I grew up in have become student only areas. We do have the best pub in the world though, so I suppose it balences out :)

Yeah it's a really cool place to be a student :) although I wouldn't like to live in Oldfield Park simply because it's just full of students. What's the best pub in the world? My vote would go for The Hobgoblin.

piinyouri:

Good lord! That second pic looks like something out of a Stronghold game!
I've never seen something look so placid and idyllic that wasn't in some sort of entertainment media.
I want to live there. ;-;

It's pretty expensive to buy a house but can be cheap if you rent in a houseshare...I only pay 325 a month for the place I'm living and it's decent enough. Anyway, have some more Bath porn:



Esotera:
OMG

Beautiful. I don't know if you know this, but there is literally nothing like this in America. I mean, there's beautiful landmarks, cities, and even towns, but nothing as storybook-esque as that. Again, beautiful.

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