Games Workshop - the omega of monopolies gone wrong?

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Or maybe I'm just getting old. I was thinking of making this thread a long time ago, but it seemed kind of petty (and let's face it, it still is), but after seeing the new Dark Elf sets I couldn't not make this thread anymore.

For the entire time I've been playing their games their policies have been, save for one notable exception, baffling beyond belief. Never have I seen any company have such an openly hostile "fuck you" attitude towards its customers. But what are we gonna do? They make the rules and miniatures, and while there are some alternative miniature manufacturers, getting alternative models for any army beyond the most typical stuff is next to impossible.

As you all know, the prices for GW products are absurdly high, and are raised like every 2 years. Some of it I can see justified, but most of it I cannot see be anything else than "We wantz ur munny!!!!1" I understand the rising cost of plastic and making those molds for all those detailed miniatures has got to be pretty damn expensive. But how do you justify raising the prices of all the other products (ie. rulebooks, paints, brushes, tape measures, accessories like spell cards etc.) as well? I'm pretty sure there's still quite a bit of wood left in the world to make paper for all those books.

I once heard a GW employee justify the ridiculous prices by saying that making the molds for the miniatures is really expensive, and the molds don't last very long. Fair enough, but why do they keep bringing more and more detailed miniatures out each year while also remaking old ones if the production costs are so high? The Dark Elf War Hydra, for example, has been reworked twice during the last 9 years. The most staggering slap to the face was the new Dark Elf warrior set, which I'm going to compare to the one I saw in stores for most of the time I have been playing:

- The old set had 16 models, the new one has 10
- When I started playing, the regiment sets were 25€ each. The new one costs the same, but has less models
- The detail and weapon options have been significantly diminished in the new set

So they're charging the same amount of money for a set that has less models of poorer quality with fewer options. I just... don't even... what?

The "Fine"cast line (aka Failcast) was also another "Wut?" GW replaced all their metal models with lighter, softer resin cast versions of the same models, and then raised the prices. The detail on the resin models was slightly sharper, but it couldn't make up for the air bubbles that made some models nearly impossible to even assemble properly and the fact that the resin models could almost be squished with bare hands into tiny little pieces, whereas the old metal models you had to beat with a hammer to really damage them.

Add to this the drop of support for nearly all their smaller specialist games, lack of support for fan events and websites, turning their own magazine and even website into disgusting circle-jerks of ads and hype, i.e. removing nearly everything worthwhile from both, the "special offers" on their websites that don't give any discount, the removal of almost all their special collector's models from their webstore, and many many more things that I've surely forgotten to mention here, and you have a company that makes EA and Activision look like tender choir boys in comparison.

TL;DR: Forget calling EA evil, just look up the shit GW has pulled on their customers. Is there any company that has an even worse policy in regards to its customers? Because GW goes beyond merely trying to take our money, and seems to actively want to alienate its supporters.

Shit, this turned out to be another rant on GW, didn't it?

Eh, constantly revving up the prices on their stuff is greedy and annoying, not particularly evil.

Having said that, GW has been giving an atittude of not actually caring about their product for many years. They aren't obliged to care, though, but it was one of their strengths back when they had it.

TBH, I used to be quite bitter about how they sold out, but then everyone does it, it seems. Now, I don't begrudge people making money, that's sorta what they are there for, but I can't respect people who don't seem to take pride in their work.

Cost of miniatures and materials was the main reason I quit the tabletop game. And that was a good 5 years ago now. God only knows what the prices are at now!

I remember the days when a Codex was £8. Those were the days.

TimeLord:
Cost of miniatures and materials was the main reason I quit the tabletop game. And that was a good 5 years ago now. God only knows what the prices are at now!

Interestingly, they've not bothered to update the prices on their specialist games stuff. If you can find compatible miniatures before they kill those off (*grumble*), they are often a lot cheaper than comparable new stuff.

Metal tactical squad for $40 when I started...

EDIT: Having said that, when I started, some 15+ years ago (ah, the days of sustained fire dice...), people were still complaining about overprices miniatures.

Agreed, it has gotten a bit absurd over the years. The price hiking we are kind of used to. And I could live with that due to all the extra bitz and ease of converting stuff. The modelling part of the hobby is not too shabby novadays. But if you want to actually play then you are out of luck. The rules are horribly unbalanced, often to the point of being unplayable. There is barely any support at all to stimulate the customers.

When the latest Eldar Codex came out I bought the White Dwarf to see what was new. Well, finally some plastic wraithguard, a shabby-looking flyer and a gigantic wraithlord/minature titan. There was not a single article about the rules, nothing about tactics, nothing in regards to fluff or theme. Compare to the White Dwarf for the earlier codex. 5-6 pages about change of theme and altered rules, how the new models are supposed to function. Add to that articles about army building, specific ones for painting the aspects, and so on. Reading the White Dwarf gives me no reasons or interest in buying their products at all anymore. Ironically enough because they all focus on advertising and nothing on the actual hobby.

thaluikhain:
Eh, constantly revving up the prices on their stuff is greedy and annoying, not particularly evil.

Having said that, GW has been giving an atittude of not actually caring about their product for many years. They aren't obliged to care, though, but it was one of their strengths back when they had it.

TBH, I used to be quite bitter about how they sold out, but then everyone does it, it seems. Now, I don't begrudge people making money, that's sorta what they are there for, but I can't respect people who don't seem to take pride in their work.

Raising the prices of their stuff is fine, that sort of comes with economic difficulty. What isn't okay is charging more for less and poorer quality products. Or maybe it's like what Yahtzee said about Capcom in his RE5 review: they're not evil, they're just idiots. Which would make sense, because it's the only explanation I can think of for that hideous reworking of the website around 2007-ish(?) when they effectively eliminated everything interesting that might get new hobbyists hooked and just made it a webstore.

Angelowl:
Agreed, it has gotten a bit absurd over the years. The price hiking we are kind of used to. And I could live with that due to all the extra bitz and ease of converting stuff. The modelling part of the hobby is not too shabby novadays. But if you want to actually play then you are out of luck. The rules are horribly unbalanced, often to the point of being unplayable. There is barely any support at all to stimulate the customers.

I disagree, they'd got wonderfully detailed badly thought out models. In the old days, the models were a bit rougher, but they made sense (doomwheel excepted). Now every WHFB army needs a ridiculously over the top chariot or something.

And, FFS, some decent female models wouldn't hurt. Now that they've got rid of the Escher, female humanoids are reduced to, with a very few exceptions, the odd female elf or eldar in a regiment, wyches in fetish suits, or DE witches in fetish outfit with whips.

(That is, is you exclude the power arnoured Sisters. Which include naughty nuns in their fetish underwear being led by a Sister Superior with whips)

Angelowl:
When the latest Eldar Codex came out I bought the White Dwarf to see what was new. Well, finally some plastic wraithguard, a shabby-looking flyer and a gigantic wraithlord/minature titan. There was not a single article about the rules, nothing about tactics, nothing in regards to fluff or theme. Compare to the White Dwarf for the earlier codex. 5-6 pages about change of theme and altered rules, how the new models are supposed to function. Add to that articles about army building, specific ones for painting the aspects, and so on. Reading the White Dwarf gives me no reasons or interest in buying their products at all anymore. Ironically enough because they all focus on advertising and nothing on the actual hobby.

In my day, they'd be including 5-6 pages of fiction in the lead up to the new codex. Old WDs are worth reading for the flavour text alone.

bartholen:
Raising the prices of their stuff is fine, that sort of comes with economic difficulty. What isn't okay is charging more for less and poorer quality products. Or maybe it's like what Yahtzee said about Capcom in his RE5 review: they're not evil, they're just idiots. Which would make sense, because it's the only explanation I can think of for that hideous reworking of the website around 2007-ish(?) when they effectively eliminated everything interesting that might get new hobbyists hooked and just made it a webstore.

Eh, if it brings in the money, why should they care?

By comparison, everyone hated the first star wars prequel, but went to see the second, hated that and went to see the third. Why bother?

Personally, I think that's a terrible attitude, but it's working for them.

Tabletop gaming has always been an expensive hobby, and Warhammer happens to be the poster child for the out of control prices. It's incredibly stupid of Games Workshop to do it that way, since the only people who can really afford it are middle aged men who have been playing tabletop games since the original D&D[1], but I guess it's on them if their products wind up dying out in 10 or 20 years because they failed to hook the next generation.

In other words, greed is not good.

[1] And I don't mean AD&D

As a side note (I have nothing really to add that hasn't been already said) how much of their profit is actually from models? Something tells me that the Black Library and game licensing (I guess this no longer applies) may be the actually monetary muscle of GW.

It's a shame that they seem to have decided that Apocalypse and larger models are really the ones that deserve the special attention, rather than the smaller-scale skirmishes of Cityfight et al.

Basically, they seem to be bringing what are essentially the Forge World models into the regular range, which is off-putting to anyone who would rather play/collect/model/paint on the cheap.

One would surmise simply that a business that needs to grow can't stand still; but as most people are saying they don't stop to consolidate and just go out of control on everything.

bartholen:
Never have I seen any company have such an openly hostile "fuck you" attitude towards its customers. But what are we gonna do? They make the rules and miniatures, and while there are some alternative miniature manufacturers, getting alternative models for any army beyond the most typical stuff is next to impossible.

If you don't like their policy (which I don't blame you for) have you considered not playing Warhammer at all? I used to play a lot of GW games and they've produced some truly glorious game systems but I never really considered their big 3 to be among them. I got a bit sick of 40k's squidgy rules but always loved Battlefleet Gothic, when they stopped making the models I realised I'd never be able to repair the models I damaged getting to uni which was actually pretty gutting. When that happened I started looking for other wargames and I ended up playing Warmachine, Privateer Press have a very good pricing policy and their books are pretty self contained.

I'm not sure they are all that overpriced. Specifically, I glanced at one of their competitors, Privateer Press (Warmachine), and the prices seem to be roughly in line with GW's.

However, it was only a glance - someone more familiar with GW's competition would be able to speak more intelligently about this then I.

Nghtgnt:
I'm not sure they are all that overpriced. Specifically, I glanced at one of their competitors, Privateer Press (Warmachine), and the prices seem to be roughly in line with GW's.

The models are roughly the same price but the armies are many times smaller, a fully competent army can consist of say two squads of infantry, a warcaster and two warjacks. You can get starter kits for each faction that include a warcaster and between two and four warjacks (depending on faction) for £35/$50 which will happily form an army you can play proper battles with, albeit small ones.

Eh...maybe. They pissed me off when they removed all their collectors and specialist game stuff as well as the majority of the Inquisitorial acolytes, but I guess that's their choice to make.

As for the price of the game/miniatures, yeah I guess they are pricing them out of the range of kids, but I think they're starting to aim more at the middle aged wargamers with money that played when they were kids. Look at Forge World, a good portion of it is basically Rogue Trader redesigns.

As long as you don't play in GW then you can use whatever models you want and play a total mix and match of units and scenarios.

PS: Eldar warlock £7.20. I bought the exact same model in a 3 pack with 2 others (one of which is still on sale for £7.20) in 1991 for £2.99

I remember in days of yore... You could buy models marked A with a mere £3...

GW as a company sucks some serious dick. There needs to be some kind of organised boycott on the things.

I am always loathed to buy GW models due to the extortionate prices, and as you said GW have a monopoly and they know their fanbase can be milked like hell and they can take the piss with less models for higher prices.

I used to do a few armies now I'm down to Dark Eldar, Space Orks and Vampire counts.

The thing that annoys me most is that whilst prices continue to rise to the levels that only well established, middle aged fans can afford, GW's attitude of eliminating support for older games, overhyping publications and producing exaggerated, ridiculous models alienates that very same fanbase. How can such a system as this even generate profit?

I'm honestly surprised Warhammer bootlegs are basically nonexistant. I mean making them is simple and dirt cheap, making them identical to or even better than the licensed ones and sell them literally for cents would be a breeze. I guess that'd be the only way to break Games Workshop's monopoly. Once they're painted, nobody would see the difference anyway if there is any.

Captcha: exercise more

Bite me, captcha.

bartholen:

As you all know, the prices for GW products are absurdly high, and are raised like every 2 years. Some of it I can see justified, but most of it I cannot see be anything else than "We wantz ur munny!!!!1" I understand the rising cost of plastic and making those molds for all those detailed miniatures has got to be pretty damn expensive. But how do you justify raising the prices of all the other products (ie. rulebooks, paints, brushes, tape measures, accessories like spell cards etc.) as well? I'm pretty sure there's still quite a bit of wood left in the world to make paper for all those books.

The "Fine"cast line (aka Failcast) was also another "Wut?" GW replaced all their metal models with lighter, softer resin cast versions of the same models, and then raised the prices. The detail on the resin models was slightly sharper, but it couldn't make up for the air bubbles that made some models nearly impossible to even assemble properly and the fact that the resin models could almost be squished with bare hands into tiny little pieces, whereas the old metal models you had to beat with a hammer to really damage them.

The nonsense that things are more difficulty to produce or that Finecast is a somehow more elaborate/justifiably expensive is complete hogwash. If you go on the specialist forums like Dakka and a few others, you can see how the real dedicated modders and stuff break down the process. Finecast is actually a cheaper process and making models has actually gotten simpler/cheaper. The hobbyists there were able to successful reproduce every Eldar unit with home modeling kits. Technology has made things easier to do and I would speculate that it's actually causing losses for them because they raise costs in response.

Many have truthfully said that if the game was cheaper, more people would get into it, flesh out their armies or start additional ones but instead they raise prices to cover loss. It's a pity and a shame, I love 40K, I've read countless novels and even started a pretty diverse Dark Eldar army but the more I found out about Games Workshop's dubious sales tactics, the more I became disenchanted with the entire prospect.

Chaosritter:
I'm honestly surprised Warhammer bootlegs are basically nonexistant. I mean making them is simple and dirt cheap, making them identical to or even better than the licensed ones and sell them literally for cents would be a breeze. I guess that'd be the only way to break Games Workshop's monopoly. Once they're painted, nobody would see the difference anyway if there is any.

Not actually true. You have people 3d printing stuff, any discussion about conversions online is going to involve cheaper models from somewhere else, and then there's stuff like this:

http://www.heresyminiatures.com/shop/

I mean...really.

AccursedTheory:
As a side note (I have nothing really to add that hasn't been already said) how much of their profit is actually from models? Something tells me that the Black Library and game licensing (I guess this no longer applies) may be the actually monetary muscle of GW.

Nah, apparently it's the models. It used to be that something like 60% of their income was just Space Marine stuff (or so I'm told), dunno if it's the same now.

Chaosritter:
I'm honestly surprised Warhammer bootlegs are basically nonexistant. I mean making them is simple and dirt cheap, making them identical to or even better than the licensed ones and sell them literally for cents would be a breeze. I guess that'd be the only way to break Games Workshop's monopoly. Once they're painted, nobody would see the difference anyway if there is any.

Captcha: exercise more

Bite me, captcha.

This right here, this is why GW gets away with what they do. Because so many customers are locked into the mindset that they need miniatures to play GW's games. This cedes all control to GW. Now that would make sense if GW's games were good, but they're terrible. There are vastly better games out there, games which encourage more strategic thinking, which can be played with fewer models, and which have better models than GW makes. But so many players are locked into the mindset of "How can I use this to play Warhammer?" It drives me crazy because people dismiss wonderful models because the models don't have an immediate, pre-defined place in their terrible game. When this sorceress riding a giant owl kit came out, I remember the reaction being lukewarm because elves can't ride giant owls in the game. Never mind that it's a beautiful model, sculpted with loving attention and observation of the natural world, oozing creativity and atmosphere. But "the rules don't allow it, so wah..." (read that in Jim Sterling's whiny-mocking voice, please).

Games Workshop is the MacDonald's of miniature gaming. They make a bland, inoffensive, easily-digestible product which is consistently available around the world so that when you just want something simple and easy and don't want to have challenge yourself to find something better you always have an option. Except they've fooled themselves and their customers into believing they are the only game in town, that their Big Macs are filet mignon, and that their prices must be scaled accordingly. And so many players just accept it.

I'm one of those folks who consumes only the books, reads lore, buys video games, and contemplates purchasing pre-painted models off ebay because reasons

I know the company is a little wonky. I feel like I could do a better job at making their awesome grimdark universe more relavent. But i'm not in a position to consult so I will let them get on their merry way and just think about how great it would be to be able to put imperial aquilla over all the doors in my apartment.

bartholen:
[snip]

Don't worry, in ~5 years 3D printers will be affordable (to buy and use) and the 'plans' to create GW models will be on torrent sites.

Then GW will have to redesign their business model to cope with the change in value /demand of their products.

TechNoFear:
Don't worry, in ~5 years 3D printers will be affordable (to buy and use) and the 'plans' to create GW models will be on torrent sites.

Then GW will have to redesign their business model to cope with the change in value /demand of their products.

You can already get 3D printed GW stuff, or decent substitutes. People don't want to though, people currently at least prefer getting the real thing.

TimeLord:
Cost of miniatures and materials was the main reason I quit the tabletop game. And that was a good 5 years ago now. God only knows what the prices are at now!

I remember the days when a Codex was £8. Those were the days.

Same here. Once I became able to experience the Warhammer universe in computer games I couldn't give up table top quickly enough. Heck, these days I think it would be cheaper to just become a dope fiend than to take up table top gaming.

ForumSafari:

bartholen:
Never have I seen any company have such an openly hostile "fuck you" attitude towards its customers. But what are we gonna do? They make the rules and miniatures, and while there are some alternative miniature manufacturers, getting alternative models for any army beyond the most typical stuff is next to impossible.

If you don't like their policy (which I don't blame you for) have you considered not playing Warhammer at all? I used to play a lot of GW games and they've produced some truly glorious game systems but I never really considered their big 3 to be among them. I got a bit sick of 40k's squidgy rules but always loved Battlefleet Gothic, when they stopped making the models I realised I'd never be able to repair the models I damaged getting to uni which was actually pretty gutting. When that happened I started looking for other wargames and I ended up playing Warmachine, Privateer Press have a very good pricing policy and their books are pretty self contained.

Not really, no. Despite my ranting, I still enjoy playing both 40k and FB immensely (yeah, I like it, sue me) and my miniature collection has gotten quite vast on every one of the 4 armies I play. Plus I very very rarely buy stuff new from GW anymore.

Chaosritter:
I'm honestly surprised Warhammer bootlegs are basically nonexistant. I mean making them is simple and dirt cheap, making them identical to or even better than the licensed ones and sell them literally for cents would be a breeze. I guess that'd be the only way to break Games Workshop's monopoly. Once they're painted, nobody would see the difference anyway if there is any.

Captcha: exercise more

Bite me, captcha.

Because GW has an exceedingly aggressive attitude towards bootleggers and recasters. I can't remember any example of them doing that now, but they tried to sue a guy for copyright infringement because he used the term "Space Marine" in his novel. So, yeah, I wouldn't want to tempt fate by trying to sell recast versions of their models on the Internet.

bartholen:
Because GW has an exceedingly aggressive attitude towards bootleggers and recasters. I can't remember any example of them doing that now, but they tried to sue a guy for copyright infringement because he used the term "Space Marine" in his novel. So, yeah, I wouldn't want to tempt fate by trying to sell recast versions of their models on the Internet.

You don't have to, mind, you are allowed to make and sell similar stuff.

In many cases, this is quite reasonable, GW doesn't have the monopoly on naked elf women with whips. For that matter, GW is heavily inspired by other people's ideas.

Sometimes it's fairly blatant, though. Heresy Miniatures are asking for trouble.

You know what the worst part is? Even if the price isn't much of an object (and it isn't for me), even if you have a ready venue (I'm sure there's one around here somewhere), I still have to assemble and then paint dozens of tiny models.

I literally have zero interest in the arts and crafts aspect of the game. I've tried to get into it and somewhere around here I have three different battleforces (IG, Space Marine and Eldar) of which perhaps a total of 20 models have ever been assembled and painted.

That's why, were I ever to actually get into a tabletop game, I'd probably opt for something like Warmachine - at least then I could spend a day gluing and painting and just be done with it.

AccursedTheory:

As a side note (I have nothing really to add that hasn't been already said) how much of their profit is actually from models? Something tells me that the Black Library and game licensing (I guess this no longer applies) may be the actually monetary muscle of GW.

... A depressingly large part of me wanted him to be holding a bolt pistol.

... And be a commissar.

I have only ever bought a couple of boxes of Chaos Marines because I quite enjoy assembling and painting them. Then after one house moving later every single one of them was smashed to pieces. I wasn't even that pissed off until I went to visit a friend later on who has been playing it for years and had models you'd need to take a house brick to to dent. Hearing about the lower prices too put me right off. Basically I'd considered it as a new thing to do but dropped it thanks to their horrible price and cost cutting exercises.

I'd say the idiocy of table top and video gaming are quite different with that in mind. Games Workshop are pinching every penny with literally no plan of how to sustain itself. The likes of EA just have this insane belief that if they spend more money then millions of customers will pay full price for it in the first week. Its pathetic, but they do at least see a window for profit in there somehow.

Someone write quite a good blog on how Games Workshop has basically become the stagnant, dying Imperium of the tabletop world. http://thefrontlinegamer.blogspot.co.uk/2011/09/is-imperium-metaphor-for-games-workshop.html

bartholen:
Because GW has an exceedingly aggressive attitude towards bootleggers and recasters. I can't remember any example of them doing that now, but they tried to sue a guy for copyright infringement because he used the term "Space Marine" in his novel. So, yeah, I wouldn't want to tempt fate by trying to sell recast versions of their models on the Internet.

I think in future the issue is more likely to be people making them for themselves at home, rather than commercial bootlegging. At the moment ebay is cheap enough to make the hassle of casting too much bother for most people. Casting is messy, time consuming and takes a bit of practice to get good at and unless you buy large tubs of material it's not that cheap either so for a starter it can be a bit off-putting. When 3D printers get going though it might be a different story.

thaluikhain:
You don't have to, mind, you are allowed to make and sell similar stuff.

In many cases, this is quite reasonable, GW doesn't have the monopoly on naked elf women with whips. For that matter, GW is heavily inspired by other people's ideas.

Sometimes it's fairly blatant, though. Heresy Miniatures are asking for trouble.

Absolutely, there are loads of companies making 28mm sci fi minis that you can use if you play with your friends. It only feels like a monopoly because people are convinced that GW is the only place to play GW's games and you have to play the latest edition. I started collecting warhammer minis back in 1991 and I only played my first game in a GW about a year or so ago and I still play Rogue Trader.

There's a good few "totally not Warhammer honest" companies out there (although personally I prefer ebay) and plenty of generic sci fi and fantasy companies that you could substitute. But I do kind of get the OP's point that, at least with 40k, it's very difficult to make a full on army like that, and in many cases the alternatives are just as or more expensive than GW and you're pretty much limited to IG substitutes. That's why GW keep going I think, they have a very large range of very nice models with a distinct look that the smaller companies just can't afford to put out and can't copy too closely. Sure you can get elves elsewhere, but you want Eldar? You gotta go to GW.

http://sciborminiatures.com/en_,index.php
http://www.gaspez-arts.com/home.html
http://maxmini.eu/
http://eurobitz.com/fr/121-warforge
Reaper do a few that fit in with GW too.
http://www.manticgames.com/home.html
http://www.pig-iron-productions.com/
http://www.hfminis.co.uk/
http://studiomcvey.highwire.com/
http://www.urbanwarthegame.com/store-ecwid.php

and plenty more. Even with all those companies you still don't have the range you do with GW unless you're looking for alternate IG (and even then it's primarily infantry) and you have to piss around dealing with all these different websites. There are online mini stores that group them together but they rarely have the full ranges. So really, unless you're very devoted to it GW is just easier.

bartholen:
Because GW goes beyond merely trying to take our money, and seems to actively want to alienate its supporters.

Aren't Games Workshop the ones who tried to claim that they had the legal rights to the phrase 'space marine', despite it existing in various forms about 30 years before they used it? And ended up threatening some independent sci-fi writer for using the phrase in a rather insignificant ebook?

If so then yep, I agree; their management people are alienating, moneygrabbing bastards with no respect for the sci-fi genre!

Yeah, they charge way too much. Even thier books are too expensive (16 $ for Ahriman? Come on)
I used to experiment making my own awhile ago, but that was complete failure. In a couple years though, ill come back to this when 3d printing is easier/cheaper.

Whats even worse is they never make jewelry anymore (bolter shell necklace I Need One argh) Butbthey activly look for and prosecute those that do, even if it isntms business. Now Thats absurd.

I see your point, but honestly it's something I'm having a hard time getting worked up about.

Yes, they basically dominate the industry, and they probably do overcharge, but if people continue to buy from them despite the price increases, it essentially continuously sends the message to them that their prices and business practices are acceptable (if they weren't they would see a massive decrease in sales).

Likewise, let's face it here: we're not talking about some evil corporation raising the price of bread and medicine for people who are dirt poor, this is a tabletop game with models, it's just entertainment.

Here's an easy explanation:

Their tactics are having the dual effect of 1) making it more expensive for new TT gamers to enter the market, and 2) alienating their less 'loyal' consumer base.

So why have GW been making less miniatures for the same price, dropping quality, and increasing the price of their print items? Because they're shifting the lost revenue from their rapidly shrinking fanbase to their still existing fans.

This is why I washed my hands of the whole tabletop thing 5 years ago and I'm done with gaming outside of the indie scene right now, both the video games industry and the tabletops are having the exact same problems.

I have a feeling within about 5 years Games Workshop will end up pulling a SEGA and get out of the miniatures business altogether, they'll just stay open for business marketing their game settings to video game companies and authors.

They've made it so that the only people who can afford their stuff are spoilt kids and middle aged men. Never mind the ethics of it, it seems like a terrible business model.

Personally I'll occasionally buy something i like the look of, just to paint. Its way too expensive to do anything more than that.

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