Senpai may be added to the English dictionary

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http://goboiano.com/news/4400-senpai-may-be-added-to-the-english-dictionary

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So it seems yet another Japanese word may be officially be adopted into the English language, but unlike Bukaki this is a fairly filthy one in its connotations. I mean come on this was adopted as a joke because of anime, but it might be turning into an actual official word in the dictionary? I don't even know what the dictionary is anymore.

Makes sense to me. When a word becomes so widely used it deserves to be recognized, regardless as to what its origins are. It's kind of silly, sure, but dictionaries have an obligation to keep up with society's ever evolving vocabulary.

It better say "See Japanese Dictionary"

Otherwise our dictionary will just be every word of every language which would be too much. Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

Saelune:
Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

Wouldn't be the first time that happened. Anime and Otaku are perfect examples of the same word having different meanings between Japanese and American English.

They gonna add Waifu next too? Seriously, it's used as a very well known in-joke between anime/manga fans. Don't add it into the damn dictionary.

Zontar:

Saelune:
Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

Wouldn't be the first time that happened. Anime and Otaku are perfect examples of the same word having different meanings between Japanese and American English.

Cause you know the people deciding this stuff aren't people in the know...we live in a world where a fucking emoji was -word- of the year. They need to read their own dictionaries.

Elfgore:
They gonna add Waifu next too? Seriously, it's used as a very well known in-joke between anime/manga fans. Don't add it into the damn dictionary.

Waifu isn't even like, a Japanese word, which is what infuriates me the most. I bet a lot of people think it is though. Its the equivalent of adding "to" to the end of a word to make it sound Spanish.

Yo wanto, taco, pleaseto seniorio.

Senpai finally noticed dictionary-chan?

Saelune:
It better say "See Japanese Dictionary"

Otherwise our dictionary will just be every word of every language which would be too much. Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

English is already more or less an amorphous blob of languages.

Saelune:

Zontar:

Saelune:
Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

Wouldn't be the first time that happened. Anime and Otaku are perfect examples of the same word having different meanings between Japanese and American English.

Cause you know the people deciding this stuff aren't people in the know...we live in a world where a fucking emoji was -word- of the year. They need to read their own dictionaries.

Well that's true, but even those using it use those two words differently since anime and otaku aren't exactly the same on both sides of the Pacific.

Saelune:

Elfgore:
They gonna add Waifu next too? Seriously, it's used as a very well known in-joke between anime/manga fans. Don't add it into the damn dictionary.

Waifu isn't even like, a Japanese word, which is what infuriates me the most. I bet a lot of people think it is though. Its the equivalent of adding "to" to the end of a word to make it sound Spanish.

Yo wanto, taco, pleaseto seniorio.

But seriously, Waifu isn't even a Japanese word? *goes on a google adventure* Holy shit it isn't. That's god damn hilarious.

The Philistine:
Senpai finally noticed dictionary-chan?

Saelune:
It better say "See Japanese Dictionary"

Otherwise our dictionary will just be every word of every language which would be too much. Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

English is already more or less an amorphous blob of languages.

I don't think a minority of a subculture poorly using a Japanese word really deserves Dictionary level recognition. English being what it is because of clashes of different cultures throughout history in Europe and later the Americas as it developed over 1000+ years is more justifiable.

I hope their at least gonna include kohai too if this is for real

*shrug*

God forbid the English language adopt a word from another language and mangle the meaning in the process.

It's unprecedented!

English isn't French. There is no "official" English; many of the more snooty members of the upper classes of the UK may love to pretend otherwise, but considering the abuse they heap upon the letter 'R', the rest of us are right to ignore them. As there is no official English, there is also no official record of it; the Oxford English dictionary served as an important high-level reference document, but no one's going to take you seriously when you add in "D'oh" as though it were a real word.

And actually reading the link, it's not the OED, it's Merriam-Webster. That's even better. Webster never bothered to IP-protect his name; the Merriams bought the rights to his work, but anyone could put out a "Webster's dictionary" so far as Noah's concerned. There's nothing "official" about this- though I do admit "dictionary adds word indiscriminately" doesn't have much drawing power.

Saelune:

Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

Wait. That's not what it means? I'm too afraid to Google it now.

Elfgore:
But seriously, Waifu isn't even a Japanese word? *goes on a google adventure* Holy shit it isn't. That's god damn hilarious.

I educated myself today on what the kanji and actual phonetic word for wife is in Japanese. THANKS, ESCAPIST.

I don't really care whether senpai gets added into the English dictionary or not. Kinda weird, but nothing too bad.

Programmed_For_Damage:

Saelune:

Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

Wait. That's not what it means? I'm too afraid to Google it now.

Senpai means senior ranking student, so if you're a freshman, a sophomore and up would be addressed as Senpai. However its become, half jokingly, half not, to refer to crushes. Likely due to crappy romance anime having girls fall for perhaps older male students, or just wanting to put their crush above them, since social rank is very important in Japanese culture.

Saelune:

Programmed_For_Damage:

Saelune:

Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

Wait. That's not what it means? I'm too afraid to Google it now.

Senpai means senior ranking student, so if you're a freshman, a sophomore and up would be addressed as Senpai. However its become, half jokingly, half not, to refer to crushes. Likely due to crappy romance anime having girls fall for perhaps older male students, or just wanting to put their crush above them, since social rank is very important in Japanese culture.

its more kind of 'mentor' or 'big brother' to kohai's 'student' or 'little brother'.

Next you're going to tell me they're going to add ayyylmao smh tbh fam to the dictionary.

LegendaryGamer0:
Next you're going to tell me they're going to add ayyylmao smh tbh fam to the dictionary.

Don't give them ideas!

Silentpony:

LegendaryGamer0:
Next you're going to tell me they're going to add ayyylmao smh tbh fam to the dictionary.

Don't give them ideas!

Clearly they already have somebody that's aware of this bullshit so I would say it's not too far off.

Saelune:

Programmed_For_Damage:

Saelune:

Plus I doubt it will refer to the actual Japanese meaning of senior/higher ranked student.

Wait. That's not what it means? I'm too afraid to Google it now.

Senpai means senior ranking student, so if you're a freshman, a sophomore and up would be addressed as Senpai. However its become, half jokingly, half not, to refer to crushes. Likely due to crappy romance anime having girls fall for perhaps older male students, or just wanting to put their crush above them, since social rank is very important in Japanese culture.

Colour me informed. I've only ever heard it used in a martial arts background, given I'm hardly the demographic for the anime.

The dictionary is already full of ridiculous nonsense words that should never have been acknowledged to exist, anyway. Words like selfie, manspread, bruh, and swole. The chance to have the official record of our language not sound like it came from a bunch of mouth breathing morons has already passed.

infohippie:
The dictionary is already full of ridiculous nonsense words that should never have been acknowledged to exist, anyway. Words like selfie, manspread, bruh, and swole. The chance to have the official record of our language not sound like it came from a bunch of mouth breathing morons has already passed.

Up until this point in life I had been fortunate enough to have never encountered the word "swole" before. Thank you for ruining that for me.

FirstNameLastName:

infohippie:
The dictionary is already full of ridiculous nonsense words that should never have been acknowledged to exist, anyway. Words like selfie, manspread, bruh, and swole. The chance to have the official record of our language not sound like it came from a bunch of mouth breathing morons has already passed.

Up until this point in life I had been fortunate enough to have never encountered the word "swole" before. Thank you for ruining that for me.

Glad to be of service. *bows*
Share the pain, share the love.

If "bae" can be a word in the Oxford dictionary, then I have absolutely no problems with "Senpai" being included.

English is already a hodge-podge of different language words being thrown into a mixer over the centuries, and like all languages it is constantly evolving. If enough people recognise a word due to its popular use, why should not be added to the dictionary?

Although what pisses me off is when enough people say a word but mean the opposite, and because enough people use the word wrong it becomes a new definition. It may be IRONIC, but if people don't stop misusing words so that it completely alters their meaning I will LITERALLY explode with rage. (See what I did there?)

Edit: Here's a handy link for people who think we shouldn't appropriate words from other languages. You are to stop using these words immediately - http://www.englishleap.com/vocabulary/foreign-language-words

Well that happens, but why Hayao Miyazaki quote? The guy is an elitist snob who is WAY overrated.

... excuse me my good sir but THE English Dictionary is the hhhOxford dictionary thank you very much.

In all seriousness this is pretty cool. Seeing stuff in other cultures that we like and then quietly stealing it and passing it off as our own is in an English tradition.

Sensei must have been in most English dictionaries for ages by this point right?

Zhukov:
*shrug*

God forbid the English language adopt a word from another language and mangle the meaning in the process.

It's unprecedented!

This.

The way people are acting, you'd think we're on the verge of an Anglish revolution.

Here is an incomplete list of words English loaned from the 20th century.
If this any dumber than turning the German noun for lightning into a verb for rapid action?
Also I just learned that the word "Angst" is actually a 20th century German loanword, one that we've apparently butchered.

Here is an incomplete list of words English loaned from the 20th century.
If this any dumber than turning the German noun for lightning into a verb for rapid action?
Also I just learned that the word "Angst" is actually a 20th century German loanword, one that we've apparently butchered.

double post

Why is Merriam Webster stealing our memes though?

People here know the word?

Then it is entirely valid to add it in the dictionary...

My understanding is that the notion of "seniority" pervades through a lot of Japanese culture, and well beyond high school- that "junior" employees are implicitly expected to serve drinks to "senior" employees at the semi-mandatory company social outings, for example.

Without *quite* the same notions in the west, it does sound a little silly when there are already perfectly adequate terms to express seniority.

Which is, y'know, what the word actually means.

...And? A single word is being added to a book containing tens of thousands of words. I'm more annoyed that the informal definition of literally (IE not really literally) is in the dictionary now.

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