What kind of insects and animals do you deal with where you live?

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After doing my near-daily ritual of 'clear all the various spiders out of all my shit', I began to wonder, what kind of critters do people living elsewhere have to deal with on a daily basis, and how do they deal with them? Everywhere has some kind of pest, so I figure, hey, internet searches don't do much, let's field this question on the forums instead! That'll be fun!

For me, as a Suburban South Australian, I have Spiders. Lots and lots of Spiders (if the opening sentence couldn't give that away). There's two general kinds of spider around here - the 'active hunters' which tend to be big-fuck off spiders that roam around, but are generally pretty harmless (Huntsman Spiders, White Tips, Wolf Spiders), and the 'poisonous waiters' which hang around in webs and fuck your shit right up if they happen to bite you (Redback Spiders, Black House Spiders). While my typical approach to them is 'slap the shit out of them with a sandal', Huntsmans and Wolf Spiders happen to be just big enough that that would just piss them off, so I try to catch them and throw them over the fence instead. Also because they're big enough that they cause a hell of a mess if I do squish 'em, so saves me cleaning up more spider guts than I should.

So, denizens of the internet, what critters do you have to deal with where you live? Poisonous insects, common vermin, strangely pesky sheep? What pests do you have?

(PS: please put any pictures of spiders in spoiler tags, just in case anyone here's got Arachnophobia. Internet forums are the last place you really want to see 'suddenly spiders!'.)

australian here as well. aparrt from the ones you have we also have ant.. jackjumpers whose bite a lot of people are allergic to and inchman which are ants literally an inch long and can sting you through jeans without any issue.

the armour on an inchman is so tough that unless you try and squash it on a hard surface like concrete you will just piss it off

Spiders of various sorts, but most of the are cool. Orb spiders are pretty. Apparently we have so many spiderwebs in our front yard that some Mormons were coming along door to door proselytizing, looked at them and decided against it. Too soft to preach in Australia!

Also, cicadas that like to ensure you can hear nothing other than cicadas.

The odd snake, often deadly venomous. But people make too much of a fuss about them. Australia has 7 different types of antivenins for snake bites, the next countries only have like 3. So, Australia is much safer, right?

Magpies that will attack anyone getting too close in nesting time. Apparently they also hold grudges and remember people, so will selectively target some people more next year.

Also, bats and possums and the odd echidna or goanna or wallaby.

I live in the Netherlands, so just birds and insects (including spiders). Only the latter causing the slightest annoyance. Not much going on here flora and fauna wise.

Also Netherlands, and we thankfully have no insects, spiders or snakes living here that are poisonous to the point of being any kind of danger to humans. Most dangerous animal living here are bloody deer, especially when they try and cross the road.

Your regular old house fly is my greatest annoyance. I hate them with a fiery passion and the only good fly is a dead fly.

Yeah we don't really have this here in Germany.
So I guess maybe mosquitoes? Or cats ,you know if you are allergic against them.
Oh and birds, nothing is more annoying than going to sleep at 5 AM after a productive night of gaming and have one of those shits start singing right next to your window. If only you could understand my pain and suffering.

Well, the Aussies have already 'won' the thread by default, but I guess I'll pitch in.

Belgium. Only vermin we generally have to deal with are mosquitos, houseflies, pidgeons and seagulls.

Australian #4 reporting with the customary spiders and snakes.

Mostly huntsmen spiders. I don't like killing things without cause so I'll generally herd them out with a long stick since I refuse to touch the creepy little beasts. Failing that I either let them be or kill them depending on which room of the house they're in. Bedroom is a death sentence.

Used to get snakes when I lived in the country. If it was only adults at home we'd just chase them off. They'll happily flee if given the chance. (Most bites happen when people step on them without seeing them.) However, sometimes we'd have to kill them because we couldn't risk them being near the little kids. Tried to keep it quick, pin them to the ground with a rake then take off the head with an axe. (We didn't own a gun.)

Where I live now we get a lot of possums. Not that they're a threat or anything, but I often have to resist the urge to pat them. Some of the local ones are sufficiently accustomed to people that they'll let you get within arm's reach.

Mosquitoes that can give you shit like dengue, zika, chikungunya, which I got early last year and it took me nearly a year to fully recover, since it's something that really messes with your joints. At one point I could barely walk, and I was desperately trying to "outrun" this old lady one day, who looked like she was well into her 70s. I lost, though.

This 2 inch bug that chews through wood and is incredibly annoying. When it "flies", it's buzzing all over the place because it can't fly at all and it's a nightmare trying to hit it with a magazine or some shit. That won't kill it, but it will probably land somewhere, then you can step on it.

Flying cockroaches. Fuck them too.

Snails. I have no idea where they come from. Everything is fine, then the next day I'll walk my dog in the morning and they're all over the garden, or in my mailbox, eating my mail.

There's a bunch of tiny spiders, but nothing compared to what you have there.

I guess that's about it.

Pygmy rattlesnakes, copperheads, brown recluses, the occasional black widow, water moccasins, and snapping turtles of all shapes and sizes. Of the non-life threatening variety, deer, deer, opossums and armadillos. Did I mention deer? I remember seeing one alligator snapper on the side of the highway that buzzards were trying to flip. Had to be at least 150-200lbs. He survived the encounter. Coming back the opposite direction, there were three dead birds and the turtle was gone. Had a baby one, maybe 5 in. across, show up by my front porch last spring. My dogs were not happy with it. It kept nipping at their toes when they got close. The monsters breed in the pond across the street so for an endangered species, they're almost a nuisance. Had this ichneumon wasp with an extended ovipostor freak my family out. It looked like a 4 inch stinger when it was actually looking for a spot to lay eggs.

spiders, wasps, mosquitos, snails and fly's i guess ya know the common stuff.
although just about everything dies when winter comes rolling in.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vipera_berus is the only venomous creature we have

Chimpzy:
Well, the Aussies have already 'won' the thread by default, but I guess I'll pitch in.

Belgium. Only vermin we generally have to deal with are mosquitos, houseflies, pidgeons and seagulls.

...so, listen, how expensive is it to live in Belgium? Not saying Australia is bad, but if there's a distinct lack of poisonous spiders there, well...

Zhukov:
Australian #4 reporting with the customary spiders and snakes.

Mostly huntsmen spiders. I don't like killing things without cause so I'll generally herd them out with a long stick since I refuse to touch the creepy little beasts. Failing that I either let them be or kill them depending on which room of the house they're in. Bedroom is a death sentence.

Used to get snakes when I lived in the country. If it was only adults at home we'd just chase them off. They'll happily flee if given the chance. (Most bites happen when people step on them without seeing them.) However, sometimes we'd have to kill them because we couldn't risk them being near the little kids. Tried to keep it quick, pin them to the ground with a rake then take off the head with an axe. (We didn't own a gun.)

Where I live now we get a lot of possums. Not that they're a threat or anything, but I often have to resist the urge to pat them. Some of the local ones are sufficiently accustomed to people that they'll let you get within arm's reach.

Not gonna lie, the lack of snakes here is kinda why I'm thankful I've never lived out in the country - spiders I can at least step on if need be. Snakes? Not so much. I've already had a Brown take a chunk out of a boot while on a field trip, don't really feel like dealing with that shit on a semi-regular basis. I only have so many boots.

(we used to have Possums - now we have owls. On the bright side, they don't try to get into my roof. On the down side, petting them is a terrible idea. They are... surprisingly vicious.)

Wrex Brogan:
On the down side, petting them is a terrible idea. They are... surprisingly vicious.)

I know! That's what makes it so hard. There's something cute and furry sitting on a fence two feet away twitching its adorable little nose at me and I can't pat it because I know that it's still a wild animal and will probably bite the shit out of me.

It's a cruel world.

Britain's native species are all pretty benign. Flying insects are an irritation though, especially if they get into the house. Midges are also unpleasant if you walk into a swarm of them accidentally. You can also damage your car by crashing into roe deer or pheasants.

My setting can best be described as a very dense college town surrounded by either farmland or undeveloped wilderness for at least fifty miles in all directions. So we get raccoons, stray cats, and the unnervingly friendly squirrels that are always found on campuses. If you go into the natural areas you can run into deer, and if you get far enough from civilization you'll be in bear and mountain lion country.

But the worst are the freshmen. At least bears don't show up to class hungover and make you grade their barely intelligible papers.

I've got very little to worry about where I live. Nothing poisonous, no enormous bugs, no dangerous predators. Just ants, really. If they get indoors they die in the corners and leave big piles of corpses. And last fall a colony of some kind of red flying beetle infested one side of my apartment building, which was gross. And I get the occasional cricket or earwig invading my peaceful home. But otherwise not much to complain about. Even the spiders here are small and inconspicuous.

The worst thing around here I guess is the occasional coyote killing a house cat or yappy little dog, but they definitely don't bother people.

Wrex Brogan:

...so, listen, how expensive is it to live in Belgium? Not saying Australia is bad, but if there's a distinct lack of poisonous spiders there, well...

There is a distinct lack of poisonous spiders in most of the western world. Australia and the US are the only two countries i can think of in the western world with poisonous animals.

Northeast American here. All i have to deal with are rats and deer. Although the rats can get....quite big (like the size of a cat). Oh, and rabbits. Rabbits everywhere.

Just got back from India, where animals are every goddamn place. Starting with the bedroom, small lizards get everywhere around the house whilst you sleep. I like them a lot, but my missus (who is far more used to them) kills them on sight. Then there are mosquitoes that bite you, packs of dogs that form outside the house and howl at all hours of the night, cows that block traffic, giant rats that jump in through the windows, goats that eat everything, and some mystery bird that keeps making this "OOooOOOOOooooo!!" noise all day, like it is sarcastically pretending to be scared of you. The only thing I haven't seen is a snake, which makes me furious because everyone there says they keep bumping into them all the time and I always somehow miss it.

In England, there are practically no animals where I live, save for the cats that are terrified of my wife, and a family of magpies that scares off everything else.

Nevada is a high altitude desert, so most of our insects freeze in the winter, still, gotta deal with black widows, mostly just don't go reaching into dark corners of your garage, the occasional brown recluse and scorpion although they usually don't hang out in houses. Rattlesnakes too, they're nice enough to warn you when they get pissed off at least.

Coyotes everywhere, you can hear them yipping at night, not really a threat to people, but they'll eat small dogs and cats at night if you aren't paying attention. Beyond that, the occasional mountain lion and bear sometimes wanders down from the foothills, there's been a couple occasions where I've found torn apart deer carcasses in my driveway, usually animal control picks them up if they hang around too close to the residential areas.

Not as numerous as some places, but still a nice variety of animals for living in a desert at least.

Wrex Brogan:

Chimpzy:
Well, the Aussies have already 'won' the thread by default, but I guess I'll pitch in.

Belgium. Only vermin we generally have to deal with are mosquitos, houseflies, pidgeons and seagulls.

...so, listen, how expensive is it to live in Belgium? Not saying Australia is bad, but if there's a distinct lack of poisonous spiders there, well...

About the same I think, but I don't really know how we'd compare to Australia. Also, we're a beer country, so ...

Keep in mind the weather sucks here though. It only a very slight step up from British weather, which is renowned for its suckiness.

Canada:
Horse Flies (real motherfuckers). A bit bigger than a common house fly, they just bite.
image

Sqeetors
image

Black Flies (mostly in the northern parts, say Northern Ontario, where they are crazy in the bush)
image

Just small spiders here, the biggest is maybe a couple inches long at the most. None are venomous. Things like:

The creepiest insect is the centipede, which aren't big, but they are really fast and always under stuff.
image

Animals you might see a deer, or a ribbon snake/garter snake (two different snakes but look very similar). I believe there is only one venomous snake here in Ontario, but it is rare; Massasauga Rattlesnake.

I live in a city, so I mostly see cats and dogs owned by people, various birds, maybe a raccoon or a skunk occasionally. I saw a red fox in my neighbourhood once, that was cool. Bears are rare in the city, but I have heard of sightings. If you go further north and in the bush you might see a Lynx or a Bobcat, but they are pretty stealthy.

Canada is pretty awesome :)
I need to move to Vancouver Island though, so I don't have to deal with god dang mosquitoes anymore!

Canada here.

For bugs, just flies, spiders (small thankfully), bees, etc.

Real pests tend to be skunks (my dog has been sprayed), racoons (garbage bags torn up constantly) and goddamn deer (always a few collisions every year in my city).

Canada here too.

Nothing as intimidating as what was described above except for the mosquitoes and fruit flies, though during summer my neighbourhood is sometimes faced with a plague of junebugs that like to infiltrate houses through chimneys and make themselves at home. I swear one year we had some the size of my fist.

I did hear an interesting story the other day about several different colours of squirrel. I only ever see black squirrels here, and they are an extremely common sight (I once saw 6 in the same yard), but a long time ago in the UK, the dominant breed was the red squirrel. Gray squirrels were accidentally imported there from the American continent, and they began to slowly drive the reds out due to being stronger as well as immune to various diseases they carried that reds were not. Years later, black squirrels were brought in, even more disease-resistant and vicious than gray squirrels, and the process repeated itself.

In the UK today, a gray squirrel is a rare sight, and a red even more so. Having lived with them all my life and having never even seen grays or reds, I never knew until now that Canadian squirrels are actually the meanest little buggers around. Probably because I've never had one attack me, but their energy is incredible, even propelling them up sheer walls of brick when they are chased.

How I know this story:

North Eastern United States, "Stink Bugs".

Apparently an invasive species that has exploded and thrived in recent years, and has invaded peoples homes into the hundreds (if not more).

They're relatively flat, green, grey, or dark brown bettle looking bugs (sometimes called "shield bugs") that are incredibly stupid as they will buzz around very loudly in random, aimless patterns and will consistently run into just about anything as a result, including YOU. YES YOU, SITTING AT YOUR COMPUTER MINDING YOUR OWN BUSINESS, but then suddenly, THWAP, a hard shelled bettles runs into the side of your face as fast as possible and lands in your lap, as you jump up using only the power of your frightened buttocks and thrust out of your chair and attempt to swipe off whatever it was that landed on you.

And they are currently hibernating, but since there are so many, they will very frequently come out in groups of two during the dead of winter likely looking for their food or new shelter. And you'll know if you have a small gap anywhere in your house, because in the summer you will find AT LEAST 4-6 of the fuckers every day until you make sure your house is properly sealed.

They don't really hurt people, at least there's no documented cases I know of, but they are very loud and when frightened they leak a disgusting, musty smell that makes me feel naseous. And killing them will almost always result in them musking, which can sometimes attract more.

Fun story, the one large window in my room is facing directly towards the morning sun, and is incredibly bright, so I had two layers of curtains over them to keep the sun out as much as possible. Worked fine until I noticed that more and more of the bastard bugs kept appearing around that window in particular. Yeah, turns out they were hibernating in between the curtains in the fucking dozens. Fun fact: My bed lays right up against that curtain.

I tore down the curtains, rolled them up, and literally tossed them out of the window so fast.

Californian here.

Thankfully we don't have much in the way of insects, mostly just small flies and bees. Nothing dangerous, just kind of annoying.

We do have some poisonous snakes in the area, including rattle snakes and coral snakes. Coral snakes don't attack people very often, but if you do get bit by one it's a HUGE issue. The US doesn't actually stock coral snake antivenin anymore and hasn't since like 2010, and a coral snake bite will paralyze your lungs meaning you will die if you don't go to a hospital and get put on a breathing apparatus.

I also live next to a fairly large nature preserve area so we get tons of coyotes, and sometimes mountain lions. The coyotes can be heard practically every night. I'm used to it but sometimes people who visit my house can't sleep because of all the howling and yelping.

Coyotes are also known for killing pets in my neighborhood. Basically any time there's a "missing pet" poster up it means coyotes probably already got them. A while back a one of my neighbors was walking her tiny dog (like a miniature poodle or something) and a coyote jumped out of some bushes, grabbed the dog, yanked the leash away from the owner and took off with it. You often see people carrying sticks, golf clubs, or small bats while walking their dogs at night.

Canada here. We dont have really much dangerous creature. poisonous critters seems to like warm temperature, and everything that should be dangerous seems to die in freezing temperature. so yay !

but, we do have mosquitos. apparently they survive winter. starting in april-may we get the little pesty mosquito that swarm you in forest and drain you from your blood to something we call the deer fly or black fly that pretty much eat a part of you skin instead of just putting a needle in your skin. the mosquito season goes until september or so.

Well, we've got the - OH GOD IT'S ON MY FACE

Wrex Brogan:

...Wolf Spiders happen to be just big enough that that would just piss them off, so I try to catch them and throw them over the fence instead...

I have this image in mind where your neighbor is barbecuing, minding his own business, when a wolf spider flies over a wooden fence and lands on his head.

.

We have tons of stupid people Florida, does that count? These are the same idiots who buy stuff like Burmese Pythons and then release them into the Everglades when they no longer want to take care of them. I'm pretty sure the local government is still paying for each non-native snake killed.

We also have random, giant iguanas running around. Those are probably mostly escapees, but possibly released when their owners grow tired of caring for them. Iguanas run away when you're near them, which is fairly rare since nobody walks anymore, but when you're near they skedaddle, making a wild ruckus. It's quite startling when you turn around and see nothing. Seeing nothing is better than being confronted by a loose dog though.

Every once in a while you'll also catch a glimpse of beautiful, exotic birds. They escaped from a local zoo when we were hit by a massive hurricane, decades ago. It's nice to see them flourishing.

Oh right, and this is the cockroach capital apparently. And we have a ton of mosquitoes. Like ten mosquitoes for every bad driver, so around 50 billion.

.

Zhukov:
...

Where I live now we get a lot of possums. Not that they're a threat or anything, but I often have to resist the urge to pat them. Some of the local ones are sufficiently accustomed to people that they'll let you get within arm's reach...

We also have possum down here, but every time I see one it's like sick or something. Wheezing like an 80-year old that smokes two packs a day and crawling in a daze like a B-movie monster.

Dirty Hipsters:
Californian here.

Thankfully we don't have much in the way of insects, mostly just small flies and bees. Nothing dangerous, just kind of annoying.

We do have some poisonous snakes in the area, including rattle snakes and coral snakes. Coral snakes don't attack people very often, but if you do get bit by one it's a HUGE issue. The US doesn't actually stock coral snake antivenin anymore and hasn't since like 2010, and a coral snake bite will paralyze your lungs meaning you will die if you don't go to a hospital and get put on a breathing apparatus.

I also live next to a fairly large nature preserve area so we get tons of coyotes, and sometimes mountain lions. The coyotes can be heard practically every night. I'm used to it but sometimes people who visit my house can't sleep because of all the howling and yelping.

Coyotes are also known for killing pets in my neighborhood. Basically any time there's a "missing pet" poster up it means coyotes probably already got them. A while back a one of my neighbors was walking her tiny dog (like a miniature poodle or something) and a coyote jumped out of some bushes, grabbed the dog, yanked the leash away from the owner and took off with it. You often see people carrying sticks, golf clubs, or small bats while walking their dogs at night.

Regarding coral snakes, in the Boy Scouts we had to memorize this poem which would allow you to recognize the difference between a deadly coral snake and the harmless king snake. You can see the difference here.

-OR- you could just use common sense and stay away from anything that looks like a coral snake instead of standing around like a moron, trying to remember some stupid poem that does more harm than good.

Zhukov:

Wrex Brogan:
On the down side, petting them is a terrible idea. They are... surprisingly vicious.)

I know! That's what makes it so hard. There's something cute and furry sitting on a fence two feet away twitching its adorable little nose at me and I can't pat it because I know that it's still a wild animal and will probably bite the shit out of me.

It's a cruel world.

I remember a friend of mine trying to pick one up (in not a totally sober state).

The possum was so cute and friendly, eating out of his hand, so he tried to pick it up.
The possum grabbed him by the arm with all 4 sets of claws and started biting him.
My friend was screaming and flailing his arm about, with the possum still attached, for a good 30 sec.
Laughed? We nearly shat!(We had not laughed so much since Grandma died. Or Auntie Mabel caught her left tit in the mangle.)

Dornedas:
Yeah we don't really have this here in Germany.
So I guess maybe mosquitoes? Or cats ,you know if you are allergic against them.
Oh and birds, nothing is more annoying than going to sleep at 5 AM after a productive night of gaming and have one of those shits start singing right next to your window. If only you could understand my pain and suffering.

Oh man, I can so related to the birds so I understand your pain.

Well we've got wolf spiders, brown recluse spiders, black widows, stink bugs, and fire ants here for insect pests.

Otherwise, deer. Lots of deer. Like, run out in the middle of the road and hit your car deer. No, not you hit them, they hit you. And they die because they hit you so hard.

We've the occasional raccoon, feral cats, the odd bobcat, and if you go a bit further south a rattlesnake here and there. Oh, Garters. Lots of garter snakes. They're not as much a pest as they do clear out other pests but it's a bit surprising to accidentally run into a nest or winter den and have to call animal control to get out dozens of 'em.

Vausch:
Well we've got wolf spiders, brown recluse spiders, black widows, stink bugs, and fire ants here for insect pests.

Otherwise, deer. Lots of deer. Like, run out in the middle of the road and hit your car deer. No, not you hit them, they hit you. And they die because they hit you so hard.

We've the occasional raccoon, feral cats, the odd bobcat, and if you go a bit further south a rattlesnake here and there. Oh, Garters. Lots of garter snakes. They're not as much a pest as they do clear out other pests but it's a bit surprising to accidentally run into a nest or winter den and have to call animal control to get out dozens of 'em.

Whoah dejavu. So where in the midwest are ya? We have some amusement parks here and whenever they have their late nights, usually around the 4th, the garter snakes like to sleep on the walkways in between attractions. Kinda makes your heart skip an extra beat until you see they're the harmless variety.

Remus:

Vausch:
Well we've got wolf spiders, brown recluse spiders, black widows, stink bugs, and fire ants here for insect pests.

Otherwise, deer. Lots of deer. Like, run out in the middle of the road and hit your car deer. No, not you hit them, they hit you. And they die because they hit you so hard.

We've the occasional raccoon, feral cats, the odd bobcat, and if you go a bit further south a rattlesnake here and there. Oh, Garters. Lots of garter snakes. They're not as much a pest as they do clear out other pests but it's a bit surprising to accidentally run into a nest or winter den and have to call animal control to get out dozens of 'em.

Whoah dejavu. So where in the midwest are ya? We have some amusement parks here and whenever they have their late nights, usually around the 4th, the garter snakes like to sleep on the walkways in between attractions. Kinda makes your heart skip an extra beat until you see they're the harmless variety.

Haha, that happens at one of our amusement parks whenever we do the Halloween special attraction. Oh do you get those wolf spiders with the leg span just bigger than a quarter that try to be intimidating? We used to have dozens of them at the place I worked and every night they'd stop in front of us when we went outside then raise their front legs like "Come at me, bro!". So we stepped on them or ran them over with the lift. Little shits.

Vausch:

Remus:

Vausch:
Well we've got wolf spiders, brown recluse spiders, black widows, stink bugs, and fire ants here for insect pests.

Otherwise, deer. Lots of deer. Like, run out in the middle of the road and hit your car deer. No, not you hit them, they hit you. And they die because they hit you so hard.

We've the occasional raccoon, feral cats, the odd bobcat, and if you go a bit further south a rattlesnake here and there. Oh, Garters. Lots of garter snakes. They're not as much a pest as they do clear out other pests but it's a bit surprising to accidentally run into a nest or winter den and have to call animal control to get out dozens of 'em.

Whoah dejavu. So where in the midwest are ya? We have some amusement parks here and whenever they have their late nights, usually around the 4th, the garter snakes like to sleep on the walkways in between attractions. Kinda makes your heart skip an extra beat until you see they're the harmless variety.

Haha, that happens at one of our amusement parks whenever we do the Halloween special attraction. Oh do you get those wolf spiders with the leg span just bigger than a quarter that try to be intimidating? We used to have dozens of them at the place I worked and every night they'd stop in front of us when we went outside then raise their front legs like "Come at me, bro!". So we stepped on them or ran them over with the lift. Little shits.

Our wolf spiders don't do that often, but our tarantulas try that when approached by a person. But you really have to piss them off first, like when I tried to scoot one across the road one summer day. He reared up and I just flipped his belly and knocked him on his ass. They really are just all show, and I don't like squishing things big enough to have a visibly active personality, not if they're nonpoisonous. Occasionally there's the rather finniky house spider that pops up in my room. One made a home under my monitor last spring and would dart at my hand while I was gaming.

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