Star Trek (Movie Review)

 Pages 1 2 NEXT
 

Star Trek

Depending on what you expect from a revitalized Star Trek franchise, what J.J. Abrams is offering will likely leave newer audiences thrilled and older fans frustrated. As for myself, I don't belong to either audience. I'm a passive observer aware of the series' finer details but not immersed in it. This means that I'm equally as eager to "go where no man has gone before" as I am to question and pick at insidious doubts in the film's logic that do unfortunately crop up. I justify my opening statement by assuming that the diehards will either forgive the inherent problems as nostalgia takes over or be resistant to what they might see as the bastardization of Roddenberry's beloved sic-if opera. As for the newcomers, this Star Trek stands as a very compelling reason to beam aboard the U.S.S. Enterprise and see why Star Trek has endured for so long.

Star Trek is an origin tale of sorts, detailing the lives of the characters from the original series and how they come to be members of Star Fleet and the U.S.S. Enterprise. First among them is James Tiberius Kirk (Chris Pine), son of George Kirk, a man who captained the U.S.S. Kelvin for twelve minutes after engaging a hostile Romulan warship while investigating an electrical disturbance in the deeper regions of space. Next is Spock (Zachary Quinto), a half human half Vulcan who embodies the age old question of whether or not absolute reason and absolute emotion can coexist. McCoy (Karl Urban), Uhura (Zoe Saldana), Scotty (Simon Pegg), Sulu (John Cho), and Chekov (Anton Yelchin) are also featured in the film, but aren't exactly given their dues. The principle concern of Star Trek is the rivalry between Kirk and Spock, and the threat of the Romulans; the other characters must wait in the wings until a sequel explores them.

The film is very pretty and incredibly impressive. The sheer scale of Star Trek's universe is impeccably presented owing much to a very liberal yet very convincing use of effects and CGI. Some might dismiss the relentless flash and noise as mind-numbing and distracting, but it's a necessary marriage that is thankfully seamless. The weight of the space battles couldn't be possible otherwise. As for the designs that aren't indebted to the use of computer magic such as costumes and sets, overall they are very crisp and clean. It's a bit unfortunate that the Enterprise looks like an Apple Store and that the Romulan ship appears to be designed by the Wachowski brothers, but it succeeds in presenting a plausible world of intergalactic diplomacy.

image

Epic in every sense of the word.

Where Star Trek begins to falter is where the plot is concerned. The script, dialogue, characters, and cinematography are all fine (outstanding in the case of the lattermost), but when the plot involving a black hole, vengeance, and world destroying technology take prominence, insidious doubts do arise as to the plausibility of it all. Generally, the progression is of the story is too convenient for my liking. Convenient not in the sense of predictability and blandness, but convenient in how the solutions to the conflicts are formed. Take for example a scene where Kirk is marooned by young Spock on an icy planet. There, he meets old Spock (Leonard Nimoy [did I mention there's a time paradox?]), heads to a Star Fleet outpost, and enlists the help of Scotty to beam aboard the Enterprise which is travelling at warp speed through space. Scotty describes the insane plan as "hitting a bullet with another smaller bullet while blindfolded on horseback" and concludes the impossibility of it all. Old Spock proudly announces that it's impossible because Scotty hasn't discovered the calculation that will enable it to work, plugs in the formula, and away they go. Doesn't this strike anyone else as being a bit of a cop-out? I'm no astrophysicist and certainly one of the last people who should be debating this, but certainly it renders the whole misadventure more than a little moot if you ask me. And since we're here, what about the impressive coincidence of Kirk being marooned on the exact same planet where old Spock was stranded, not to mention they're both within walking distance of where Scotty is idly hanging around? The Enterprise might as well be powered by the infinite improbability drive.

Despite the above oddities, I do understand and appreciate what the plot enables the rest of the film to do. Without such conveniences, the brisk pace the film maintains for a shockingly brief two hour run time would almost certainly be impossible. I'm just not sure if it was a necessary sacrifice to let the plot suffer so the audience can eagerly tell their friends about how absolutely legendary Star Trek is and thereby ensure extended interest in the property. Was it necessary that Star Trek be a shade below its potential so that the series can exist for years to come? I personally do not think so, but I'm certainly glad that the other films hopefully won't have to. Star Trek is a success, but it could have been a triumph.

Nice review, I'm seeing this tomorrow.
JJ Abrahms is one of my favourite directors, he did an excellent job of Cloverfield.

Maet:

Star Trek

what about the impressive coincidence of Kirk being marooned on the exact same planet where old Spock was stranded

Well, since its Old Spock, he would have the knowledge of Kirk being there from when he was younger, and probably planned it in advance. While it is a bit of a Time Paradox, it does "sorta" make sense in that regard.

If anything though, it was a cop-out to find a way to get Nimoy in the film, lol.

EmileeElectro:
Nice review, I'm seeing this tomorrow.
JJ Abrahms is one of my favourite directors, he did an excellent job of Cloverfield.

JJ Abrams is not a director, he's only well known as a producer.

The second spoiler tag is filled with all the plot holes that immediately sprung to my mind during and after the film. If you've already seen the movie, have a look over them and see if you can answer some of those questions.

Decent enough review though, I saw this film today and i must admit I'm not the biggest Trekkie fan, I only saw it for something to do.
I do feel somewhat disappointed about my choice, on reflection i should have gone to See Wolverine instead.

The first plot hole in the second spoiler tag can more or less be explained because

Wizzie:

Decent enough review though, I saw this film today and i must admit I'm not the biggest Trekkie fan, I only saw it for something to do.
I do feel somewhat disappointed about my choice, on reflection i should have gone to See Wolverine instead.

I recall the defense codes but never included them in that line because they were of little consequence since the Romulans manage to warp next to Earth without them (or without mention of them at least).

I still don't know if the Romulan Empire exists or is extinct. The black hole/time paradox is more trouble than it's worth. Granted, you're supposed to shut off your brain for a normal blockbuster, but strong sci-fi and logic is what Star Trek is known for. The plot weaknesses are doubly harmful because it's almost insulting.

Kajin:
The first plot hole in the second spoiler tag can more or less be explained because

So Nero knows about his home worlds impending doom in the future and destroys the Vulcan planet because they won't be able to help them? I don't know whether or not this is correct as you say it is, but if so, a big WTF?? on that one...

Zenn3k:

Maet:

Star Trek

what about the impressive coincidence of Kirk being marooned on the exact same planet where old Spock was stranded

Well, since its Old Spock, he would have the knowledge of Kirk being there from when he was younger, and probably planned it in advance. While it is a bit of a Time Paradox, it does "sorta" make sense in that regard.

If anything though, it was a cop-out to find a way to get Nimoy in the film, lol.

No, not really. Kirk was never on this ice planet in the original time line (By the way, isn't that the same planet like in Star Trek V which was located near the galactic core and not near Vulcan?).
Kirk only ended up on this ice planet because Nero changed the timeline. So it was a huge coincidence.

Most of the stuff you refer to as "plot holes" can be explained easily and was in fact explained in the film. Too bad I don't have the time for that. Pay attention next time before you write a review.

Graf Zahl:
Most of the stuff you refer to as "plot holes" can be explained easily and was in fact explained in the film. Too bad I don't have the time for that. Pay attention next time before you write a review.

Please explain (if it can be done so easily, it shouldn't take you too much time).

Ok, just some quick notes...

Maet:

I've been a fan of TOS for about a year, When i saw the movie i went in thinking "This is going to be for non-fans and its going to be lame". I ate my own words, I mean the second i saw the guy in his blue federation uniform i just thought, "I dont care what any has said, this is a star trek film. Its star trek and it will always be for the fans". The film was ledgendary and Non-fans and Fans alike will love it. 5/5 star, 100%, The Best film ever, It rules and makes twilight and all the other films this year look lame by comparrison.

Graf Zahl:
-snip-

What you say makes more sense, but there is still one big flaw I can find:

You say that no one knows about Nero's ship from the future in the current timelime. To believe this requires a massive suspension of disbelief. Would Nero really not make any effort whatsoever to try and go home after traveling through a black hole? You'd think that would be the first thing anyone would do. Not to mention the fact there's 25 years where they are apparently hanging idle somewhere. Also, Nero did destroy the U.S.S. Kelvin so Star Fleet probably had some dealings with the Romulans to see what exactly was going on. I know space is a very big place, but 25 years is a long time to go without being detected, especially when there are (or should be) at least two galactic civilizations looking for you.

(I also still find issue with Nero going on a revenge spree for events that will happen far in the future, but I guess you've already cleared that one up.)

I was hoping that the plot wouldn't fall short of the epic-ness I have been told, but once again I have been decieved. It seems like the script-writer took a look at the unoriginal Sci-fi book and thought, this'll be good. I mean...world destroying technology? I've heard that many times before. Well, this is just a review, I'll have to watch it myself to see whether I enjoy it or not.

Maet:

Graf Zahl:
-snip-

What you say makes more sense, but there is still one big flaw I can find:

You say that no one knows about Nero's ship from the future in the current timelime. To believe this requires a massive suspension of disbelief. Would Nero really not make any effort whatsoever to try and go home after traveling through a black hole? You'd think that would be the first thing anyone would do. Not to mention the fact there's 25 years where they are apparently hanging idle somewhere. Also, Nero did destroy the U.S.S. Kelvin so Star Fleet probably had some dealings with the Romulans to see what exactly was going on. I know space is a very big place, but 25 years is a long time to go without being detected, especially when there are (or should be) at least two galactic civilizations looking for you.

(I also still find issue with Nero going on a revenge spree for events that will happen far in the future, but I guess you've already cleared that one up.)

Jup, you are right on that one. Especially if you consider that Nero had to wait the complete 25 years at only one spot: The place of the black hole. He didn't know when Spock will come through the hole, so he had to guard it all the time. And it makes no sense at all not to visit the place where the Kelvin was destroyed so the Romulans had to be discovered.

I did not say that the movie is consistent from start to end, just that most of your "holes" can be explained quite easy.

I had a problem not with a few of the miraculous coincidences in the plot, but rather the complete and total disregard for easily understood physics in the movie. In other franchises this is not a much of a bother, but this is Star Trek we are talking about, they made a point of being the geek Sci-Fi show. The over top universe defying action was for Star Wars, or a similar movie (don't get your panties in a twist fanboys -or fangirls, this is a good thing, completely different movies to each be enjoyed in a different way). The movie felt more like a big budget action movie then a Star Trek movie. I knew this going in and was not disappointed in the least. I really enjoyed the movie.

Gravity gets pretty much ignored in this one. Take for example the red matter which starts a reaction where the planet collapses into a black hole. Sending everyone fleeing. If you collapsed the Earth into something the size of your fingernail it would be a black hole as well (not that it would last that long, but that is another story), however the gravity you experience at a distance from the center equal to what is currently the surface would be the same. It would continue to increase as you came closer to the surface of this tiny black hole.

Just wanted to post a few of my thoughts, and seem like a massive nerd in the process.

Seeing this sunday, will come back with impressions.

TsunamiWombat:
Seeing this sunday, will come back with impressions.

Also seeing this very soon. Will also comment on it more then.

I just liked the stuff they added in like the ending and "Damnit man, I'm a Doctor not a Physicist!"

Now I'm not a big Trekkie but I knew some of the stuff.

SPOILERS BELOW:

I thought about writing my own review but I decided to put up a response here, maybe someone will read this, maybe they won't.

I sort of agree with the review above, but my major problem with the movie was that the script was just awful and whomever wrote this should be keel hauled. I don't mean this in respect to the central ideas. Things are not "canon" with Trek because this is an alternate universe spawned by temporal manipulation (made quite clear), whether anything else will spring from this vision, or if it will be argued to have replaced the Canon (sort of like how many have argued the events of "First Contact" caused the Scott Bakula Enterprise universe and it's inconsistiencies to overwrite the previous universe). That's all for later Trek productions to work out.

The problem is with the implementation of the ideas and the plot. Not only do you have the wild coincidence above, but you've also got stuff happening like Captain Pike declaring Kirk a bloody cadet, currently in disgrace for hacking a simulator (who effectively snuck on board), First Officer under Captain Spock. Oh sure, reasons were given for a ton of Cadets being on board (emptying the Academy to deal with a massive crisis), but allegedly we are to believe that nobody of higher rank/seniority was availible on this ship, and that nobody (aside from Spock being irritated) was going to have an issue with this?

Then we get to the whole issue of the fact that Kirk mutinies at a time Spock really doesn't like him. Why he was not shot in the head or dumped out an airlock without a space suit is beyond me. Okay, well they do sort of Maroon him, but not exactly in a lethal fashion since they dump him on a planet with a Federation outpost. BUT after being Marooned he manages to "beam" back on board the Enterprise through a couple of improbable events on the planet and then as a Mutineer/Stowaway implements the wonderful plan (invented by future spock himsef) to antagonize Captain Spock to the point of violence through personal insults. This leads to Spock stepping down (after beating Young Jim nearly to death) and Kird taking the command of the ship... and nobody objects to this despite him hardly being Mr. Popular. Oh sure Captain Pike *DID* declare him First Officer (despite all common sense) but honestly the idea of anyone following this guy's captaincy at this point is like beyond all disbelief, especially given the crap he pulled with the rightful captain right before that.

The point here is that the idea of a story taking Kirk from "young cadet" to "Captain" is okay on paper, but the way the implemented it had me thinking "what have these guys been smoking?" through the whole thing. Truthfully I could suspend disbelief on 99% of the stuff other people have said in picking on it. My problem was the central script/series of events was just borked. At a certain point I couldn't sit there and say "okay this seems plausible in this fantastic context".

Otherwise some of the comments in the spoiler section of the OP's review were sort of covered. "Captain Nero" was supposed to be the captain of a mining ship, he wasn't a Romulan Soldier or anything but was there when Romulus was destroyed. His intent was to destroy The Federation as a whole as I understood it. Part of it was personal, part of it was simply the fact that The Federation and The Romulan Empire don't get along. I don't think he was ever supposed to have gone to the Empire and said "oh hey, this is what I'm going to do if you don't mind".

Red Matter was stuff cooked up to create black holes, originally in order to stop a Sun's super nova. It's pretty much an example of "Buffalo Particles" (ie something spontaneously created to solve a problem in a 'science fiction' show that is supposed to be the result of ingenius characters but is actually pulled out of the writer's A$$ whenever enough dramatic tension has been generated.... a universal staple of sci-fi drama).

We do not know how much time Nero had actually prepared and re-armed his ship, however the idea was that it was pretty much a Civilian Ship but a hundred or so years more advanced. The overall effect being like trying to take a civil war Ironclad up against a modern ocean liner. This is why it was so powerful in context to the ships around it. It wasn't some kind of super science dreadnaught or whatever, they made it's nature fairly clear.

HOWEVER Trek Nerds can tell you that it would have died during Kirk's Daddy's ramming attempt in the beginning simply because of the power of a Federation Warship's detonation. This same era of ship's self destruct took out "The Doomsday Machine" in the original Trek series and I'm sorry, 100 years of advancement aside, this mining ship was NOT the bloody Doomsday machine. (I think I have the episode title right).

Overall the time travel elements, the nature of the threat, and tying up the bigger parts of the story, all work. It's the more direct stuff involving transfers of rank/power and stuff that is right in your face that is just flat out messed up. In many respects making the opposite kind of mistake as most science fiction franchise movies.

I mean I could see the general events happening, but I just can't see Captain Kirk being the hero that saves the day, or winding up anything but an ignoble mutineer floating dead in space with a bloody phase blast through his head. It's not that what he did was evil or anything, it's just that what happened under those circumstances was idiotic.

Also, Kirk is a guy who fights multiple Klingons bare handed and wins, he is a dude who gets put into alien bloodsports and whoops up on their gladiators. Yet he gets pounded in every fight he gets in.

In the original series Spock *IS* tougher than Kirk, but Kirk can fight him to a standstill and their fights with each other have been bloody nasty (and usually with one of them holding back for whatever reason). Even when you had Spock in full Vulcan Lust-Heat he didn't exactly handle Kirk easily. But really, it's not the Spock/Kirk thing, it's the fact that he can't even handle a single Romulan on the space drill (and needs to be saved by Sulu). Finally you expect him to Punch it out with Captain Nero and finally do some real Jim Kirk Fisticuffs, and instead he gets pwned again and "wins" with a move worthy of Han Solo (got your gun!). Just not the James T Kirk I expected.

>>>----Therumancer--->

Therumancer:

-snip-

I read your entire post (which I do believe is longer than my entire review, so good job on that) and I have to say I agree with you on most accounts. Though the transfer of rank and administrative skills on board the Enterprise do bother me, it's more in the same way that evil star ships never appear to have safety regulations and are always painted in ominous shades of green and black; it's just the way things are.

I have amended the plot problems I listed to reflect the responses I've received on the topics from other people and on my reflections. I only did this now because my thread's at the top of the page again. If you didn't post, it would get lost in the shuffle and there'd be no point in making any amends at all. I didn't add in anything pertaining to character interactions (Spock dealing with Kirk, Pike dealing with the cadets, etc) because they're too numerous and too omnipresent. There'd be no point.

Eh... The "big parts of the story" don't sit for me because Nero is a terrible character (in the poor characterization sense). You don't buy Kirk being the heroic Captain, I don't buy Nero being the big bad. I suppose that's what it boils down to. Really, the complete absence of the Romulans discounting Nero's ship leaves too much in the air for the plot to really sit well. Maybe the filmmakers assumed that the Romulans being an evil race vehemently opposed to the federation would be an easy sell for new audiences (like I said in my review, I don't know if this is the case or not in any Star Trek canon) but it just never worked.

And about the Federations 100+ year outdated technology against the Romulan mining vessel, I still wonder why such a vessel is necessary to be armed to the teeth at all. Not to mention the design screams "I'm going to fuck you up" and not "I'm looking for minerals and resources."

Great review! I think i will go and see this afterall.

Maet:

You say that no one knows about Nero's ship from the future in the current timelime. To believe this requires a massive suspension of disbelief. Would Nero really not make any effort whatsoever to try and go home after traveling through a black hole? You'd think that would be the first thing anyone would do. Not to mention the fact there's 25 years where they are apparently hanging idle somewhere. Also, Nero did destroy the U.S.S. Kelvin so Star Fleet probably had some dealings with the Romulans to see what exactly was going on. I know space is a very big place, but 25 years is a long time to go without being detected, especially when there are (or should be) at least two galactic civilizations looking for you.

Just wanted to chime in on this one since no one has tackled it. There are a couple of things that you seem to be ignoring. One the federation really doesn't know very well what was going on there. Remember that the character which discussing the senior Kirk's death know of the 'lightning storm in space' and an impossibly powerful ship. Two things are possible for why they wouldn't check in on it further. 1) The reports from the survivors may have suggested that the ramming attempt was successful and after a few years of no sightings the federation decided to let it go at that or 2) The federation realized that they were entirely out matched with this thing and took the entirely sensible action of sitting back and waiting what the doomsday ship was planning on doing next.
So far as why Nero would try and destroy all the federation home planets everyone seems to be neglecting the fact that Nero is not an entirely rational being. This is one thing that I LOVED about the new movie as a Trekkie, Romulans always just seemed like pissed off Vulcans in the series and that's not what they were described as. They're like Vulcans but have not married themselves to logic, they are passionate, irrational and often ruled by they're emotions. His reasoning was a very understandable one. "I've been hurt and I want others to feel my pain." In his mind the Federation was partially responsible for the death of his home so he wanted to meet that pain on the Federation.
Lastly the question of the 25 years, I see that as being plausible if a little bit of a stretch for a couple of reasons. One, remember that Vulcans (and therefore Romulans) are very long lived, 25 years would not necessarily seem like an excessive amount of time to plot revenge. Secondly, his anger was directed very specifically at Spock, so of course he doesn't want to go through with his plan until Spock is able to see what he has wrought. And third, and I think this is the more probable reason, they really didn't have the means to meet their revenge without Spock's ship. They were powerful but obviously were concerned about Earth's defensive grid, without the Red Matter they would have never been able to do what they wanted to do. So they waited.

as I pointed out in my review.. the plothole that was glaring for me at the end of the movie was Scotty's involvement on the enterprise. If you don't get what I mean, I'll try and explain the paradox

Nero inadvertently goes back in time, and leads to the death of Kirk's father. Spock, from a timeline in which Nero didn't appear back in time and kill Kirk's father. He explains to Kirk that in the other timeline, Kirk's father was alive the whole time as Kirk became captain. He also explains that in his timeline, Kirk took on the captain's role in Pike's absence.

So The Altered Timeline (altered by Nero's presance), Kirk is Marooned by Spock on the planet (I forget the name), and finds Scotty there. Using a theory that is only revealed by the future Spock (The future that doesn't exist because of his existence in the past btw), they're able to stowaway on the Enterprise and Mutiny the ship from Spock.

Now.. In the original Timeline, how did Scotty get onto the enterprise? Was he working on that planet when Kirk took over Pike's chair? Did the destruction of the Kelvin somehow lead Scotty down a path where he coincidentally is on the same planet that A Future Spock and Kirk are marooned on? A lot of the Coincidences people complain about I think are based on the idea that the characters were fated to be together.. I don't think that's really the case, but if this is the case, then that's a HUGE coincidence.

If Kirk had control of the Enterprise from the word go, like Future Spock explained to be the case in his timeline, he'd have no excuse to be on the planet, find scotty, use some impossible transporter theory to get aboard the enterprise and take command back from Spock.

Altorin:
as I pointed out in my review.. the plothole that was glaring for me at the end of the movie was Scotty's involvement on the enterprise. If you don't get what I mean, I'll try and explain the paradox

Nero inadvertently goes back in time, and leads to the death of Kirk's father. Spock, from a timeline in which Nero didn't appear back in time and kill Kirk's father. He explains to Kirk that in the other timeline, Kirk's father was alive the whole time as Kirk became captain. He also explains that in his timeline, Kirk took on the captain's role in Pike's absence.

So The Altered Timeline (altered by Nero's presance), Kirk is Marooned by Spock on the planet (I forget the name), and finds Scotty there. Using a theory that is only revealed by the future Spock (The future that doesn't exist because of his existence in the past btw), they're able to stowaway on the Enterprise and Mutiny the ship from Spock.

Now.. In the original Timeline, how did Scotty get onto the enterprise? Was he working on that planet when Kirk took over Pike's chair? Did the destruction of the Kelvin somehow lead Scotty down a path where he coincidentally is on the same planet that A Future Spock and Kirk are marooned on? A lot of the Coincidences people complain about I think are based on the idea that the characters were fated to be together.. I don't think that's really the case, but if this is the case, then that's a HUGE coincidence.

If Kirk had control of the Enterprise from the word go, like Future Spock explained to be the case in his timeline, he'd have no excuse to be on the planet, find scotty, use some impossible transporter theory to get aboard the enterprise and take command back from Spock.

Well one of the biggest WTF Moments is that elder Spock is confused as to Kirk even showing up. I mean it would have been one thing if like Spock (who apparently created Red matter) was explained to have mad temporal engineering skillz and had somehow managed to predict the changes and was waiting for Kirk or something. It would have been easier to write around that then the "wild coincidence".

I mean not only is that a wild coincidence, but why in heck is Spock hiding out in that cave all by himself when he knows (from his dialogue) that there is a Federation Outpost not too far away. Why had he not headed for that outpost himself?

A bit more attention with the script would have been nice.

THAT said, Romulan designs are generally fairly intimidating, and I've noticed in Deep Space 9 and such that most freighters and such are carrying some weapons, also space pirates and stuff do exist (although admittedly the "Orion Syndicate" only gets much handling in the olllld cartoon and Enterprise and they are allegedly the biggest group). In a lot of science fiction space miners need to be able to defend all that ore they did up, as well as fight off claimjumpers. "Belters" are some bad mothers, and oftentimes do things like carry military grade weapons specifically because the pirates and stuff they might wind up defending themselves against rarely follow the laws either.

I mean, I can understand a mining ship being like that, along with all of the rowdy tatoos and such.

Of course the big question I have here is how the holy H@LL do they even know who the Romulans are in that universe. See it was a big deal when Kirk more or less made first contact with the Romulans and duelled their champion head to head (discovering things like the Romulan ship having more limited weapons range). He beat him using what amounted to a makeshift nuclear space mine if I recall. I also remember a bit about "OMG, they look just like Vulcans".

The only real explanation I can think of is that perhaps this is acknowlegding "Enterprise" as Canon. I haven't watched too much of that show so I have no idea if they brough the Romulans into it. At which point the arguement could be made that the Original Series, and "Next Generation" series were effectivelly "cancelled" by Picard travelling back in time to fight the Borg and making first contact with The Vulcans and being "uplifted" (as opposed to the original history where Earth developed it's own space program and had first contact with The Alpha Centurian). Vulcan sponsorship does change things I suppose because as I understood things Earth never really got involved in the intergalactic community as "newbies". Rather by the time they did much of anything there was already an alliance between (I believe) Humans, Alpha Centurians, Andorians, Tellarites, and Vulcans.

The point here being that this bit if temporal interferance might have put events in motion that caused the Humans and Vulcans to learn about the Romulans earlier than expected, and thus contact had taken place between Kirk and their captain.

But the bottom line here (in another long post) is that if we're going to pick on the plotlines, the fact that they knew what Romulans were (other than mysterious aliens) was another "what the heck are they thinking" moment, again unless my nerdism is at fault and this is a spinoff of events in Enterprise.

>>>----Therumancer--->

Therumancer:

The only real explanation I can think of is that perhaps this is acknowlegding "Enterprise" as Canon.

And they do. Surely you caught on the part about "Admiral Archer's beagle" ending up disappearing in Scotty's experiment to conduct transwarp teleportation (which is long range teleportation used in DS9 a few times). Captain Archer is the captain in Enterprise. And incidentally, why Scotty's stuck on the planet.

As for your other questions, there was a comic series released in preparation that fills in a lot of the holes you pointed out.

As I said, most of this was in a comic that also included some members of TNG in it. Having read it, I now understand most of the movie. Including the references to old Star Trek TV shows with transwarp teleportation, red matter and adaptive Borg technology.

McClaud:

Therumancer:

The only real explanation I can think of is that perhaps this is acknowlegding "Enterprise" as Canon.

And they do. Surely you caught on the part about "Admiral Archer's beagle" ending up disappearing in Scotty's experiment to conduct transwarp teleportation (which is long range teleportation used in DS9 a few times). Captain Archer is the captain in Enterprise. And incidentally, why Scotty's stuck on the planet.

As for your other questions, there was a comic series released in preparation that fills in a lot of the holes you pointed out.

As I said, most of this was in a comic that also included some members of TNG in it. Having read it, I now understand most of the movie. Including the references to old Star Trek TV shows with transwarp teleportation, red matter and adaptive Borg technology.

Aha, okay I did not read that, but it would explain things. Honestly I think the idea of putting the preamble to a movie like this into a totally differant form of media is ridiculous. I don't read many comics anymore (the occasional TPB collection or Graphic Novel) and honestly I was never into TV show comics at all.

Oddly I will admit I did not catch the referance to Admiral Archer, though I do remember the Beagle.

I'm totally behind you in that it was a terrible idea to release a mini-series of comic books to go with a blockbuster movie.

If anything, they should have done animated or slide show in video format on the website and everywhere they advertised Star Trek so you could understand the events leading up to the plot in the actual movie.

I realize that it was one way to prevent possible spoilers, but man, if someone doesn't want spoilers, they'll just NOT WATCH THE VIDEO.

I just want to know why there was not ONE ship, missle, flying car, large bird, whatever!, to crash into and destroy that drill thingy on either vulcan OR earth. I mean if 2 "Machine guns" can destroy it, it must not be that tough.

live long and prosper

SteveZim1017:
I just want to know why there was not ONE ship, missle, flying car, large bird, whatever!, to crash into and destroy that drill thingy on either vulcan OR earth. I mean if 2 "Machine guns" can destroy it, it must not be that tough.

The same reason why they let a miner get his hands on super secret technology and build it into a mining ship and not, for example, a warbird.

Maet:

Wizzie:

Decent enough review though, I saw this film today and i must admit I'm not the biggest Trekkie fan, I only saw it for something to do.
I do feel somewhat disappointed about my choice, on reflection i should have gone to See Wolverine instead.

I recall the defense codes but never included them in that line because they were of little consequence since the Romulans manage to warp next to Earth without them (or without mention of them at least).

I still don't know if the Romulan Empire exists or is extinct. The black hole/time paradox is more trouble than it's worth. Granted, you're supposed to shut off your brain for a normal blockbuster, but strong sci-fi and logic is what Star Trek is known for. The plot weaknesses are doubly harmful because it's almost insulting.

Kajin:
The first plot hole in the second spoiler tag can more or less be explained because

So Nero knows about his home worlds impending doom in the future and destroys the Vulcan planet because they won't be able to help them? I don't know whether or not this is correct as you say it is, but if so, a big WTF?? on that one...

(oops quoted)
1 he does know the codes BECAUSE He inserted the beetle thats what they tell you thats what happens you don't have to see the actual codes to know that
2 The romulan empire does still exist but Nero just wants revenge that's all
3 as i said before revenge It was also noted in this review that they had Massive advanced weaponry on a mining craft and then a what the heck notice... They're from the future what had you expected? things improve.. ow and they stole weapons from spock
4 Then you add that they presumably waited for spock all those years i think they had been preparing stuff and perhaps did go back in again i am not certain
5 then the scotty/spock thing It's been explained that spock has stranded It is literally just coincidence
the reason for scotty to be inplace is also justified with a reference to the last series ...

Anyway i love how they resetted the whole universe and killed of their own fanbase a little with this movie
IT WAS A GOOD MOVIE DAMN IT and that's it it's the start to a new chain of movies be HAPPY

Ixal:

SteveZim1017:
I just want to know why there was not ONE ship, missle, flying car, large bird, whatever!, to crash into and destroy that drill thingy on either vulcan OR earth. I mean if 2 "Machine guns" can destroy it, it must not be that tough.

The same reason why they let a miner get his hands on super secret technology and build it into a mining ship and not, for example, a warbird.

McClaud:

So when the Romulans knew about the nova in advance, why didn't they evacuate the planet (at least the senate)? And why didn't they use their super plot technology against the Klingons?

And I don't accept that the huge Romulan empire which spans an entire quadrant had no other ships left than a small mining vessel. The same way I don't accept that a single supernova can destroy large parts of the galaxy. And even if it could, it would take hundreds or thousands of years as it would travel at ~light speed.

 Pages 1 2 NEXT

Reply to Thread

This thread is locked