So, what's best?
Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion
36.1% (53)
36.1% (53)
Dragon Age: Origins
24.5% (36)
24.5% (36)
Dark Messiah of Might and Magic
3.4% (5)
3.4% (5)
Frogger
3.4% (5)
3.4% (5)
Fallout 3
30.6% (45)
30.6% (45)
Aqua Teen Hunger Force: Zombie Ninja Pro-Am
1.4% (2)
1.4% (2)
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Poll: It's About Time :: Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion (a super-mecha-awesome review)

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It's About Time! reviews by a Stranger

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(Cue epic music)

Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion

Oblivion... it's a word that means one thing for gamers and another for everyone else, the internet tells me that oblivion means "the state of being disregarded or forgotten". But for me, and most likely many of you, Oblivion conjures up images of vast green plains and Giant Rats being set on fire. The reason for me writing this review is threefold: firstly it's a response to Saving Princess's article on it, secondly I have yet to explain my full standing on this game after my Dragon Age: Origins review and lastly, I have nothing better to do and this is going to take a lot of time.

Now it's worth noting that I spent a lot of my time on this game, days in fact, I even know people who measure their time spent on Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion in weeks. I bought the 430 page game-guide for it and even then I have never really gotten over my experience with the game. What Oblivion is, is an RPG where the player finds that they are a prisoner, one that is about to escape. Your cell is the entrance to a secret escape route out of the city, which is opened by the Emperor and his guards as they try to flee a group of assassins. You follow the Emporer into the ruins that make up the escape route and witness his assassination, before he dies he gives you the Amulet of Kings to take to a man named Jauffre. And just like that you are thrust in the wide open world.

First impressions, the game is gorgeous, not to mention massive. Even nowadays the graphics hold up very well, the water borders on photo-realism and each area is stuffed full of plants, rocks and hills. It is an environment that you could happily explore for hours, this is vital for a game such as this as that is exactly what you are meant to do. The main problem with the world of Oblivion is that it's rather too big, it means locations are spread out and there is some obvious copying and pasting of various sections. Notably the cave dungeons are almost indistinguishable from each other. There is an option to fast travel to places you have already visited and while this is useful it does serve to make Cyrodill feel a lot smaller than it actually is.

So off you go, diligently following your orders and when you finally meet Jauffre (it takes quite a while to get to him), he tells you that the land of Cyrodill, the country you're in, is under threat from a demonic force known as the Daedra and the only way to stop them is to find the Emperor's illegitimate son which leads onto another thing, and another, and another. Let's just say that the story of Oblivion isn't exactly its strongest point, but do you know what? I don't care.

image

Wait a minute... shouldn't I be scared of you? You look terrified.

Because you see, in my 80 hours plus I spent on this game I never finished the story mode for both the reason of the lack of motivation from the story and also the fact that I really didn't like going into the other dimension of Oblivion, it's boring and rather too red for my taste. Instead I completed the side-quests, of which there are many. Along with the rag-tag of one-off requests from villagers there are four main side quest arcs: the Fighters' Guild, Mages' Guild, Thieves' Guild and Dark Brotherhood. As well as the Daedric quests, Arena battles and so on. Completing all of them can take weeks, even with a book that tells you exactly what to do. My favourite by far was the Dark Brotherhood quests which had you travelling around the land of Cyrodill, killing a variety of people, the quests were challenging, entertaining but still relatively short, for those that have played the game "Whodunnit?" will stir up some happy memories.

What further adds to your playtime is the exploring that can be done, at some point during their time with Oblivion most players will think "fuck it" and go off into the wilderness to see what they can find. You are rewarded for doing so, you'll find a whole (albeit similar) range of dungeons where you can level up by killing enemies or you can find powerful and rare weapons. It's a very fun thing to do but it does damage the story even further since if you're busy frollicing in the mountains and ignoring quests suddenly the incoming horde of demons doesn't feel too imminent, but that is a problem with all free-roaming games like this.

Now being that this is an RPG there are many, many different ways in which you can play it, this is made possible by the wide array of options that are available to you: there is a total of 10 races all with their specialities, 13 birth-signs (you pick one of them, they range from permanent attribute boosts to powerful spells), 8 attributes, 3 specializations and 21 skills. It means you can fine-tune your character to be whatever you want, the only problem is that certain specialisations/attributes/skills/races benefit each other meaning that there will always be a best way to do something. So if you're a Breton with magic specialisation, Apprentice birth sign (+100 Magicka) and you pick the 7 mage skills then you are basically unstoppable compared to say, a Wood Elf warrior. What makes it worse is that these benifits push you towards "pure" class builds to have the maximum skills, meaning to be the best you can be you have to be a pure Mage, Warrior or Rogue. Which isn't really the level of customisation that we were promised.

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Train hard, level up and you too could look like an oversized novelty garden gnome.

The way the skill system works is by levelling up skills as you use them, this is great since your favourite style of play but this also presents a problem. What if I, for some reason or another, want to use a bow with my hammer-wielding Orc? I can easily use it but it will be bloody useless. Again this pushes you toward one style of play, admittedly this is your favourite style but everyone gets the urge to try something new every once in a while. But since you can simply make a new character with a different style this can be worked around.

Combat is a bit of a mixed bag in Oblivion, on one hand you have the terrible melee combat which feels clunky and crude, especially when compared to games such as Dark Messiah of Might and Magic which does first person melee combat incredibly well. But then you have the magic combat which I think is done fairly well, especially when you consider the almost infinite amount of spells that are available (you can make your own you see). The ability to enchant your weapons with various effects also adds another element to it and further lets you play the way you want to. I was quite fond of exploding arrows with my rogue and I have to tell you, the effects of it are hilarious.

Stealth is an area where Oblivion holds up very well, even when you max out the skill there is still a moderate challenge, it also allows people who may not want to kill everyone to simply slip through unseen. Furthermore, you can attack while hidden for an automatic critical hit. Outside of combat, stealth also allows you to creep through peoples' homes and stash their stuff which is yet another thing you can happily spend hours doing.

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No matter what level you are, guards are always more powerful. So
why can't they save the world instead?

The one thing that I see so many people whine about is the way most of the enemies level up with you. This way you don't feel a sense of progression as you never have a chance to brush away enemies with one sweep that used to take you a long time to kill. But there is another side to it, the constantly levelled enemies means that there will always be some kind of challenge. The sense of progression comes with the new and exciting ways you get of killing enemies as you level.

There are however, many problems with Oblivion; the sheer amount of bugs serves to frustrate and annoy (though the ones in Fallout 3 are a lot worse) and the wide open world is let down by an insane amount of pop-in images and parts where the game freezes to allow the next area to load. Add this to the already impressively long loading times between dungeons and it's easy to get angry with this game. Also, there are only a small amount of voice actors and whenever you talk to someone and ask for rumours it's a lucky dip as to which voice will play, this breaking the immersion that this game relies on.

The thing is, I haven't even scratched the surface of this game, there is just so much to do and so much that I can talk about but in the end I don't think anyone wants to read through 10+ pages of my incessant whittering. Yes, it is true that this game does have its flaws... loads of them at that... quite big ones too, but overall it is most certainly still a good game. There are so many people that become so easily absorbed into the word of Cyrodill because in the end, it is a damn good game.

Any feedback, however irrelevant or mundane excites me sexually is always wanted, if I've missed something out be sure to say what. Thanks for reading

The BB code for the "other reviews box" has just gone over one page in Word, wow. I wonder how many people clicked on this review because it had "super-mecha-awesome in the title... most of them I'll bet. Anyway stop reading this and comment!

Well done on the review, nicely written and congrats on the 40 reviews

Stranger of Sorts:
-ReviewSnip-

Yeah, you definitely highlighted why a lot of people liked this game, funny enough we agree on a lot of what the game has, but what you seemed to brush under the rug (bad story, bad combat) really stood out to me, and what you seemed to like (random dungeons, tons of side quests having nothing to do with the narrative, etc.) were actually what I didn't like. I thought Dragon Age, even with it's obnoxious difficulty swings and padded length quests did a much better job of adhering to the narrative. Granted it wasn't the open world type game that Oblivion was, since you allowed comparison in your poll I figure you see them in the same vein.

All in all, it was a very accurate review... though, in the spirit of what everyone does to me... I'm gonna have to say...

Your review was too balanced, I want more opinion ;)

=D

Congrats on 40 that is about 8X more than I have...

Good review, though the main issues with this type of game (open world, massive, filled to the explosion point with content) is that unless you drop 12 pages about all the nuances, some of which are more important than the missions, then it feels weak.

Take the music for one, this game has one of the strongest soundtracks I have ever heard for raising immersion and being memorable. Lock picking? I did that more than anything else besides running and killing. Also a fleeting mention of the DLC would be a bonus (all the small ones then isles and knights). There are a million little things that are important, of course that is my opinion but regardless.

Still very good review for what it was and again congrats stranger, I look forward to you hitting #50. Cheers

Nice review very well written. I love Oblivion, one of my favourite games. You should have said a little something about the expansion packs for it to, or have you not played them? If not...do it! do it now!

The Rockerfly:
Well done on the review, nicely written and congrats on the 40 reviews

When I hit 50 there's going to be cake, honest.

SavingPrincess:
-FeedbackSnip-

Ahh I see what you did there, though come to think of it I don't think I've ever reviewed a game I really hate, should try it though. The main reason Dragon Age was included is because when I did a review of it (actually that review was pretty negative) I held up Oblivion as a "good" RPG, which ruffled some feathers.

Thanks for stopping by.

darth jacen:
Snippedy

I've never been one to notice the sound, for some reason I rarely acknowledge its existence. Although with games like this where sound isn't necessarily key to survival I usually listen to my own music while playing it. As I've previously stated, look forward to the cake.

Stranger of Sorts:

The Rockerfly:
Well done on the review, nicely written and congrats on the 40 reviews

When I hit 50 there's going to be cake, honest.

I shall bring some party hats and matches for the candles

Kungfu_Teddybear:
Nice review very well written. I love Oblivion, one of my favourite games. You should have said a little something about the expansion packs for it to, or have you not played them? If not...do it! do it now!

I have the PS3 version so it came with Knights of the Nine, which was okay but not ground breaking, contained one of the most boring quests in the game as well (The Pilgrimage). I don't think the Shivering Isles was ever released for PS3, Bethesda said they would but they kept moving back the release date till people forgot about it.

Stranger of Sorts:

Kungfu_Teddybear:
Nice review very well written. I love Oblivion, one of my favourite games. You should have said a little something about the expansion packs for it to, or have you not played them? If not...do it! do it now!

I have the PS3 version so it came with Knights of the Nine, which was okay but not ground breaking, contained one of the most boring quests in the game as well (The Pilgrimage). I don't think the Shivering Isles was ever released for PS3, Bethesda said they would but they kept moving back the release date till people forgot about it.

Yeah personally i think Knights of the Nine was the worst out the three story quests (Main Quest, Knights of the Nine and Shivering Isles) but it was still ok. But the Shivering Isles is incredible shame it wasn't released on PS3

Stranger of Sorts:
Snippedy

Oh I will, though here is some of the music just as a reference:

Also I now expect cake, if there is none there will be hell to pay! :)

*Also just remembered, the music changes when an enemy is near, so in this game it can be life or death ;)

Stranger of Sorts:

Kungfu_Teddybear:
Nice review very well written. I love Oblivion, one of my favourite games. You should have said a little something about the expansion packs for it to, or have you not played them? If not...do it! do it now!

I have the PS3 version so it came with Knights of the Nine, which was okay but not ground breaking, contained one of the most boring quests in the game as well (The Pilgrimage). I don't think the Shivering Isles was ever released for PS3, Bethesda said they would but they kept moving back the release date till people forgot about it.

It is on the PSN store for 20$ and also it is on the GOTY edition I bought...

It's a good review, and it mirrors my opinions on the game nicely (woo for my first 'WRPG'!), but you do have several problems with grammar and flow. Nothing too major to completely break the pacing, but enough to be noticeable. Here are a few examples:

Along with the rag-tag of one off requests from villagers there are four main side quest arcs...

Like this. It took me a while to understand what you meant here, and errors like this are a good way to lose your reader's attention: if they're thinking on what you meant, and still reading, then they aren't processing your review. The latter is what you want them to do.

Yes, it is true that this game does have its flaws, loads of them at that, quite big ones to...

Two issues here. The first I'd like to point out is the misuse of homonyms, which thankfully don't permeate your review. The second issue, however, does, which is your use of run-on thoughts that actually bog down your review with a lot of repetition, or at least just too many words. Remember you can condense ideas ("...which are both numerous and major..."), or you can use other forms of punctuation, like em dashes ("--" or " - ") and parentheticals (parentheses, square brackets, etc...), to separate your main idea from your tangents/clarifications. You can use commas to separate them as well, but using nothing but commas hides the point you're trying to make and distracts the reader.

Just some general comments on your review. I can do a much more in-depth editing if asked.

As far as the game is concerned, I still need to finish it. But I'm thinking of restarting as a Khajiit rogue, as opposed to my Khajiit magic swordsman...who has the hardest time using destruction magic.

I've been all through this game. My cousin and I both have spent way to much time exploring oblivion. I still get a kick out of the way he advertised it to me. He sold it to me something like this; "Dude, you have to play this, the arrows stick in to people when you shoot them." We both had some what of a 'quest' to complete everything in the game, and I think we just about did. The Dark Brotherhood quests are pretty popular, but for me it just seemed like a bunch of 'go there, kill this' type of missions. The Thieves Guild really did it for me. The Shivering Isles was absolutely amazing as well, you're really missing out on that one.

darth jacen:
would but they kept moving back the release date till people forgot about it.

It is on the PSN store for 20$ and also it is on the GOTY edition I bought...[/quote]

I knew it was on the GOTY edition but it must have come out on PSN after Fallout 3 came out since that's when I stopped checking the store every week.

Heart of Darkness:
It's a good review, and it mirrors my opinions on the game nicely (woo for my first 'WRPG'!), but you do have several problems with grammar and flow. Nothing too major to completely break the pacing, but enough to be noticeable. Here are a few examples:

Along with the rag-tag of one off requests from villagers there are four main side quest arcs...

Like this. It took me a while to understand what you meant here, and errors like this are a good way to lose your reader's attention: if they're thinking on what you meant, and still reading, then they aren't processing your review. The latter is what you want them to do.

I think what I should have done here is write it as rag tag one-off requests so it's easier to understand. The problem is I have a very oratory writing style so things like this are always popping up.

Yes, it is true that this game does have its flaws, loads of them at that, quite big ones to...

Two issues here. The first I'd like to point out is the misuse of homonyms, which thankfully don't permeate your review. The second issue, however, does, which is your use of run-on thoughts that actually bog down your review with a lot of repetition, or at least just too many words. Remember you can condense ideas ("...which are both numerous and major..."), or you can use other forms of punctuation, like em dashes ("--" or " - ") and parentheticals (parentheses, square brackets, etc...), to separate your main idea from your tangents/clarifications. You can use commas to separate them as well, but using nothing but commas hides the point you're trying to make and distracts the reader.

Similarly here, this was meant to represent a chain of thought, I have it clear in my head of what it should sound like but again, it obviously didn't transpose too well. I think it would work better if I used "..."'s (I forget the word for them) instead, therefore there is a pause between them but each section runs along into the next.

Elispse, thats the set of periods name, as so you know :)

darth jacen:
Elispse, thats the set of periods name, as so you know :)

M'kay.

Zero Pattern:
I've been all through this game. My cousin and I both have spent way to much time exploring oblivion. I still get a kick out of the way he advertised it to me. He sold it to me something like this; "Dude, you have to play this, the arrows stick in to people when you shoot them." We both had some what of a 'quest' to complete everything in the game, and I think we just about did. The Dark Brotherhood quests are pretty popular, but for me it just seemed like a bunch of 'go there, kill this' type of missions. The Thieves Guild really did it for me. The Shivering Isles was absolutely amazing as well, you're really missing out on that one.

Yeh the Thieves Guild was pretty good, especially the last quest, that one was pretty intense.

Stranger of Sorts:
The one thing that I see so many people whine about is the way most of the enemies level up with you. This way you don't feel a sense of progression as you never have a chance to brush away enemies with one sweep that used to take you a long time to kill. But there is another side to it, the constantly levelled enemies means that there will always be some kind of challenge. The sense of progression comes with the new and exciting ways you get of killing enemies as you level.

Sure a challenge is good and all, but when everything that you fight is difficult then it gets frustrating. Add that to leveling inwhich you stray even slightly from strict leveling can cause you to be outgunned by most oponents. Hopefully the next Elder scrolls they are bringing out will have fixed these issues.

Nunny:

Stranger of Sorts:
The one thing that I see so many people whine about is the way most of the enemies level up with you. This way you don't feel a sense of progression as you never have a chance to brush away enemies with one sweep that used to take you a long time to kill. But there is another side to it, the constantly levelled enemies means that there will always be some kind of challenge. The sense of progression comes with the new and exciting ways you get of killing enemies as you level.

Sure a challenge is good and all, but when everything that you fight is difficult then it gets frustrating. Add that to leveling inwhich you stray even slightly from strict leveling can cause you to be outgunned by most oponents. Hopefully the next Elder scrolls they are bringing out will have fixed these issues.

But on the other hand if everything you fight is easy then the game is boring. Though even if you find yourself out gunned a mix of stealth attacks/poison/enchantments will take most things out in one hit.

Stranger of Sorts:

Nunny:

Stranger of Sorts:
The one thing that I see so many people whine about is the way most of the enemies level up with you. This way you don't feel a sense of progression as you never have a chance to brush away enemies with one sweep that used to take you a long time to kill. But there is another side to it, the constantly levelled enemies means that there will always be some kind of challenge. The sense of progression comes with the new and exciting ways you get of killing enemies as you level.

Sure a challenge is good and all, but when everything that you fight is difficult then it gets frustrating. Add that to leveling inwhich you stray even slightly from strict leveling can cause you to be outgunned by most oponents. Hopefully the next Elder scrolls they are bringing out will have fixed these issues.

But on the other hand if everything you fight is easy then the game is boring. Though even if you find yourself out gunned a mix of stealth attacks/poison/enchantments will take most things out in one hit.

Thats why there has to be a balance, some enemys (Atleast 50% in most cases) should become weak as you progress while others stay strong. This gives the sense that you are actualy achieving something and progressing within the story as the mighty hero/villain.

Nunny:
[quote="Stranger of Sorts" post="326.192296.6066505"][quote="Nunny"

Thats why there has to be a balance, some enemys (Atleast 50% in most cases) should become weak as you progress while others stay strong. This gives the sense that you are actualy achieving something and progressing within the story as the mighty hero/villain.

I agree with you on that (see the caption on the guard picture) but even at high levels you come across a few Mudcrabs, Giant Rats etc. and the higher levelled humans are usually really easily to kill, especially when compared to Wraiths and the like. So variation is present.

Stranger of Sorts:

Nunny:
[quote="Stranger of Sorts" post="326.192296.6066505"][quote="Nunny"]

Thats why there has to be a balance, some enemys (Atleast 50% in most cases) should become weak as you progress while others stay strong. This gives the sense that you are actualy achieving something and progressing within the story as the mighty hero/villain.

I agree with you on that (see the caption on the guard picture) but even at high levels you come across a few Mudcrabs, Giant Rats etc. and the higher levelled humans are usually really easily to kill, especially when compared to Wraiths and the like. So variation is present.

Not nearly enough though.

A good review definately hit all the major ups and downs of the game. However there was one thing that I really really didnt enjoy about Oblivion and was how easy it was to break the game. Objects like the skeleton key made certain skills and playing the game in certain ways superfluous. I have to say that personally the extremely clunky melee combat and the complete lack of interest in the main quest made this an average game at best for me...

Dragon Age had better lore/story and I actually cared about the characters. Oblivion? Everyone is a lifeless shell of a person and the lore/story makes me want to sleep.

Sorry, I guess staying up til 4 in the morning makes me a dick. On a side note It is quite fun dicking around in Oblivion more so then Fallout 3. I'll give it that.

Wow this post makes like 5% sense. I should go to sleep.

It indeed does encourage focused classes, but Fallout 3 basically said Small Guns and Lockpicking or bust. Actively punishing players who didn't walk out of the vault and use Small Guns. Hell, I was level 8 when I found my first decent energy weapon (ex, not the stupid pistol). And level 6 when I found my first Minigun. It did encourage melee, though. Giving you the powerful Baseball Bat at the very start. Which was nice!

But still, after 3,500+ hours in Oblivion, I've done it all. And all types of characters are playable, except pure non-stealth, non-alchemy archers. My favorite being the passive fighter that is the "Illusionist". Making enemies kill each other with Frenzy and Command spells is fun.

ironduke88:
A good review definately hit all the major ups and downs of the game. However there was one thing that I really really didnt enjoy about Oblivion and was how easy it was to break the game. Objects like the skeleton key made certain skills and playing the game in certain ways superfluous. I have to say that personally the extremely clunky melee combat and the complete lack of interest in the main quest made this an average game at best for me...

I don't think the Skeleton Key broke the game per-say. Lock picking isn't exactly challenging, even with a low security skill. But as I've said, the melee combat was a pretty big problem but I quite liked the fact that the story isn't that important.

Always_Remain:
Dragon Age had better lore/story and I actually cared about the characters. Oblivion? Everyone is a lifeless shell of a person and the lore/story makes me want to sleep.

Sorry, I guess staying up til 4 in the morning makes me a dick. On a side note It is quite fun dicking around in Oblivion more so then Fallout 3. I'll give it that.

Wow this post makes like 5% sense. I should go to sleep.

Yes, the lore in DA:O was pretty good, but the story was far too Lord of the Rings-y, and the game has a lot worse faults, namely the combat. Good night.

Onyx Oblivion:
It indeed does encourage focused classes, but Fallout 3 basically said Small Guns and Lockpicking or bust. Actively punishing players who didn't walk out of the vault and use Small Guns. Hell, I was level 8 when I found my first decent energy weapon (ex, not the stupid pistol). And level 6 when I found my first Minigun. It did encourage melee, though. Giving you the powerful Baseball Bat at the very start. Which was nice!

But still, after 3,500+ hours in Oblivion, I've done it all. And all types of characters are playable, except pure non-stealth, non-alchemy archers. My favorite being the passive fighter that is the "Illusionist". Making enemies kill each other with Frenzy and Command spells is fun.

Everyone I knew chose to max the Small Guns, Repair and Speech skills first (you can get 400 caps by passing a speech check right near the beginning). After that it was Lockpicking and Energy Weapons then you're good to go.

But a pure non-stealth, non-alchemy archer would be almost impossible, yes. Personally I favoured the rogue route (stealth, marksman, blade, alteration, alchemy + a random skill then + restoration because that's sort of a must have) and found the most fun to be had with that. Though I found pure mages to be way too powerful, to the point where it's boring.

Great review, thanks!

Stranger of Sorts:
Though I found pure mages to be way too powerful, to the point where it's boring.

That's why I tried stuff like the Illusionist. Fun to play. Go try it now!

Race: High Elf

Birthsign: The Mage

Skills: Illusion (DUH)
Conjuration (MOAR PASSIVE FIGHTING)
Alteration
Restoration
Mysticism
Sneak (to hide in the shadows, and Frenzy enemies without them seeing you, since Frenzy is much cheaper than a command spells, and they won't be right behind you when it wears off, too)
Destruction. (Just in case. :) You never know.)

Illusion Spells cost a rather hefty amount of magicka if you want decent duration. And you'll need money, so do what you must to get it. Custom spells are the Bread and Butter of illusionists. Get up in the Mage's Guild, or get the 2k gold for the Wizard's Tower candles.

And thanks for reminding me of Speech and Repair as basically requirements in FO3., too. Well, repair at least.

carpathic:
Great review, thanks!

No problem, thanks for commenting.

Onyx Oblivion:

Stranger of Sorts:
Though I found pure mages to be way too powerful, to the point where it's boring.

That's why I tried stuff like the Illusionist. Fun to play. Go try it now!

Race: High Elf

Birthsign: The Mage

Skills: Illusion (DUH)
Conjuration (MOAR PASSIVE FIGHTING)
Alteration
Restoration
Mysticism
Sneak (to hide in the shadows, and Frenzy enemies without them seeing you, since Frenzy is much cheaper than a command spells, and they won't be right behind you when it wears off, too)
Destruction. (Just in case. :) You never know.)

Sounds great, I'll be back when I've enslaved all of Cyrodill. I may switch Destruction with something else to stop me going all power-hungry with the fireballs and the lightning and the *galvin*.

Stranger of Sorts:

carpathic:
Great review, thanks!

No problem, thanks for commenting.

Onyx Oblivion:

Stranger of Sorts:
Though I found pure mages to be way too powerful, to the point where it's boring.

That's why I tried stuff like the Illusionist. Fun to play. Go try it now!

Race: High Elf

Birthsign: The Mage

Skills: Illusion (DUH)
Conjuration (MOAR PASSIVE FIGHTING)
Alteration
Restoration
Mysticism
Sneak (to hide in the shadows, and Frenzy enemies without them seeing you, since Frenzy is much cheaper than a command spells, and they won't be right behind you when it wears off, too)
Destruction. (Just in case. :) You never know.)

Sounds great, I'll be back when I've enslaved all of Cyrodill. I may switch Destruction with something else to stop me going all power-hungry with the fireballs and the lightning and the *galvin*.

How about Hand to Hand? For that "Last Resort" feeling.

I find the lack of the word "mod" in this topic disturbing... well I guess the game box image is of the PS3 version, but I still expected at east a reply with the word. :)

Mods were definitely the biggest appeal for me when it came to Oblivion. Without them the world is rather empty, most quests are boring/generic, and not mention all the other significant flaws like the psychic guards and horrible leveling system.

Still a decent game though, I spent quite a bit of time on it even before I got mods.

Onyx Oblivion:
How about Hand to Hand? For that "Last Resort" feeling.

In the end it went to blade for the stabby-stabby feeling with a dagger if they get too close.

Phoenix1213:
I find the lack of the word "mod" in this topic disturbing... well I guess the game box image is of the PS3 version, but I still expected at east a reply with the word. :)

Mods were definitely the biggest appeal for me when it came to Oblivion. Without them the world is rather empty, most quests are boring/generic, and not mention all the other significant flaws like the psychic guards and horrible leveling system.

Still a decent game though, I spent quite a bit of time on it even before I got mods.

As you noticed I played the game on PS3, as I do with all games so I have never played a game with mods. I don't know why you use the words "boring" and "generic" because really that is the opposite of what most quests on the game are. Pretty much all the Dark Brotherhood and Thieves Guild quests are pretty special, especially the former.

Stranger of Sorts:
I think what I should have done here is write it as rag tag one-off requests so it's easier to understand. The problem is I have a very oratory writing style so things like this are always popping up.

Oratory or not, I still have no idea what you mean by "one-off." The closest I could guess was "one of the," as that was the only thing that made sense to me. By any chance, is this phrase common around where you live?

Similarly here, this was meant to represent a chain of thought, I have it clear in my head of what it should sound like but again, it obviously didn't transpose too well. I think it would work better if I used "..."'s (I forget the word for them) instead, therefore there is a pause between them but each section runs along into the next.

I would be careful about using the ellipses, as they make your thoughts feel unfinished...

Which is something you kinda want to avoid. I'd suggest either merging your thoughts, or removing them when you proofread before you publish. Which was a question I forgot to ask last time: do you proofread these before you publish, or do you publish them as is?

Heart of Darkness:
[
Oratory or not, I still have no idea what you mean by "one-off." The closest I could guess was "one of the," as that was the only thing that made sense to me. By any chance, is this phrase common around where you live?

It is, it means one of a kind. So a one-off request would mean you would do that quest but not be asked to do another one.

I would be careful about using the ellipses, as they make your thoughts feel unfinished...

Which is something you kinda want to avoid. I'd suggest either merging your thoughts, or removing them when you proofread before you publish. Which was a question I forgot to ask last time: do you proofread these before you publish, or do you publish them as is?

Proofreading is usually minimal, every paragraph or so I read what I've done to make sure everything fits together but otherwise I only browse for mistakes at the end of writing.

Stranger of Sorts:

Heart of Darkness:
[
Oratory or not, I still have no idea what you mean by "one-off." The closest I could guess was "one of the," as that was the only thing that made sense to me. By any chance, is this phrase common around where you live?

It is, it means one of a kind. So a one-off request would mean you would do that quest but not be asked to do another one.

...Yeah, never would have guessed that. Slang might be something else to avoid, as not all of us come from the UK...

Just a thought.

I would be careful about using the ellipses, as they make your thoughts feel unfinished...

Which is something you kinda want to avoid. I'd suggest either merging your thoughts, or removing them when you proofread before you publish. Which was a question I forgot to ask last time: do you proofread these before you publish, or do you publish them as is?

Proofreading is usually minimal, every paragraph or so I read what I've done to make sure everything fits together but otherwise I only browse for mistakes at the end of writing.

That's something else I'd recommend doing: make proofreading a more involved process at the end. If you're reading with a critical eye for mistakes and problems with flow, your writing will vastly improve--not only post-proofread, but pre-proofread, too. You'll definitely see an increase in your quality of writing if you spend more time to polish the first draft, or determine if you need to scrap it entirely and start again.

Of course, doing it will take extra time on your part--time you may not have--but it's something to consider on your end.

Heart of Darkness:

That's something else I'd recommend doing: make proofreading a more involved process at the end. If you're reading with a critical eye for mistakes and problems with flow, your writing will vastly improve--not only post-proofread, but pre-proofread, too. You'll definitely see an increase in your quality of writing if you spend more time to polish the first draft, or determine if you need to scrap it entirely and start again.

Of course, doing it will take extra time on your part--time you may not have--but it's something to consider on your end.

I will definitely do that for this series as I try to make the "It's About Time" ones a bit more polished (and usually longer) than my other reviews, doing it for all of my reviews however, may take some of the fun out of it.

Heart of Darkness:

...Yeah, never would have guessed that. Slang might be something else to avoid, as not all of us come from the UK...

I never realised it was slang, the term has been around for as long as I can remember and everyone uses it so I assumed it was an international saying.

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