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Interesting and light read, enjoyed it. Gets across how I've always felt about game developing and how stressful and do-or-die the process can be. This is a lot of why I think even extremely flawed games deserve respectful critiques that don't overtly mock or tease the development team. Humans working under deadlines, you know.

The Fez guy says something horrible, right?

Wasn't that the headline for this movie that was made years ago??

OT: Indie games are only okay, they aren't as good as AAA titles for the most part. The fact that they are only Indie games, limits them. The idea is that they make something kind cool like 'Flower' then gain some momentum to make something really great like Journey, is what it's all about.

I have removed my words from this site.

Sober Thal:

OT: Indie games are only okay, they aren't as good as AAA titles for the most part. The fact that they are only Indie games, limits them. The idea is that they make something kind cool like 'Flower' then gain some momentum to make something really great like Journey, is what it's all about.

That's... an interesting way to look at it. (Can you tell I've been working on my forum diplomacy skills?)

I mean, what are you measuring them by? If we're talking in terms of polish, you can polish a turd all you like, it doesn't really make it better - and you'd struggle for AAA titles which have the sense of actual personality that you find running through a lot of renowned indie games, whilst many breach areas that mainstream publishers would never permit. (Minecraft's level of freedom, for instance.)

That's what's interesting about them; they do things you don't see in the mainstream, which rather makes the suggestion that they're "limited" difficult to understand when they're rarely doing the same thing. When developers increasingly script 'cool' sequences, Minecraft says "here's a field, build something". Whilst EA are dragging Dead Space further to the action side of things, the Amnesia devs are looking to scare the ever-loving shit out of you.

And I really hope Journey doesn't become a yardstick for anything, because... bleh.

Oh, and the Super Meat Boy chap looks like Frodo.

Sorry for coming in late. I meant to post on this so long ago, but then a mixture of forgetfulness and general stuff that needed doing got in the way.

ANYWAY.

Your review intrigues me for a very selfish reason. Well, for one it's insanely well-written and structured. It feels like an actual exploration of the things within the movie rather than the technical and academic things being listed, broken down and evaluated. It was a very complete read. However, what really struck me about it was how differently I approached my overall evaluation of the film and your own. I very much look at it is a documentary and take it from that angle whenever I think about it or discuss it or whatever, while you focus very much on the content and the underlying heart that the film has. It was a very nice, engaging take on the film which while I had considered, was never at the forefront of my mind, so I enjoyed having that second perspective that put an emphasis on the people and the situations within the film, rather than how it is as a film. If that made any sense.

My own take on Indie Game: The Movie was a little less enthusiastic, though I still really liked it. I found a fault in how the filmmakers - particularly with Phil Fish - seemed to strange out the negative and more downbeat moments for a little too long in what I think was an attempt to raise the stakes and the drama. There was certainly a payoff with Team Meat were you really see how happy and proud they are, but with Fish and Jonathan Blow there's not that sense of relief and overcoming that there probably should be. Blow's story sort of ends talking about his narcissism and his need to explain to people what the game really means to him and what it should to them, which isn't a very positive note or a great light to end on. That might be the reason why, despite his good closing monologue, I found him a little overbearing and self-aggrandizing, compared to the more down to earth Team Meat and (comparatively speaking) Phil Fish.

In the end though I found it really engaging, smart and human. There's a real sense of passion from everyone behind and in front of the camera that pushes it beyond the structural problems. Something I'd hugely recommend.

 

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