DmC: Dante May Cry With Joy

See, if I got it, I would've hated the game like everyone else does. So I must not get it and be the weird one out, because nobody who liked the previous games could possibly like this one too, because it's an insult to the franchise (I guess it doesn't fill the franchise's soul with LIIIIIIGHT) and an insult to the fans of the franchise!

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A Shrekfan Review Presents: DmC: Devil May Cry

Platforms: Playstation 3 / Xbox 360 / PC (Reviewed)
Release Date: January 15, 2013 (Console); January 25, 2013 (PC)

Developer: Ninja Theory
Publisher: Capcom

Devil May Cry is a series of hack&slash games developed and published by Capcom that began back in 2001 on the Playstation 2. It focused on smooth, swift combat with free-flowing multi-weapon combos against enemies that would tear main protagonist Dante's intestines out if so much as a simple mistake was made. The franchise has blazed a rocky trail ever since, with the sequel generally being regarded as worse in every way and the third game (a prequel to the first, for those keeping track) usually regarded as the high point. As far as the gameplay is concerned, I'd personally pick the fourth title as the strongest, but that's just me.

DmC is a reboot, or reimagining, or set in an alternate universe, or just flat-out retconned everything; nobody seems able to make up their minds about the damn thing. It's in some way related to the original franchise but not actually connected outside of housing the same protagonist, his family, and primary antagonist from the first game - and the protagonist and his family look different - so you could be forgiven for being confused on the subject. In any case, Dante stars as a cocky young man with black hair and so much attitude that he would make Sonic the Hedgehog look like a square. Long-time antagonist Mundus shows up once again as the Demon King, effectively ruling over what we see of the world, and Dante's twin brother Vergil stars as the suave leader of a rebel movement whose aim is to destroy Mundus' rule.

We're the only hope for the world, brother!
We're the only hope for the world, brother!

The story opens up with Dante living quite the care-free life, in a mobile trailer on a pier near a carnival. After being warned by a girl named Kat that he's being hunted, he is pulled into the main "gimmick" of DmC, Limbo, while stylishly getting dressed. In Limbo, the world itself seems determined to fight back and bend to the will of the demons, intent on stopping Dante no matter what. As the story progresses, Dante meets up with his brother by way of Kat, who is part of the rebel movement being run by Vergil. He finds out that he and his brother are something known as Nephilim, a spawn created by the union of a demon with an angel. They're the only people who can overthrow Mundus, who has grasped the world in an iron grip by way of... manipulative media and a soft drink. Well, it had to hit that typical Capcom cheese at some point, right? Fortunately, the writers had the foresight to skip right past dwelling for too long on how Mundus' master plan works, so while it's a bit silly, it feels right at home in the inherently silly Devil May Cry universe.

Overall, the writing stands about half a head higher than the original DMC games did. Let's face it, Capcom doesn't have the best writing staff in the world. They don't even have a mediocre writing staff; they're just downright silly. But in DmC, they've managed to characterize Dante, Vergil, and Mundus rather well. Dante still sports his classic cocky, sarcastic persona and once you're past the opening he really feels like he's still the same Dante we all knew and loved, just slightly more human - ironic considering his new heritage. Vergil isn't the same crazy, power-obsessed madman hell-bent on destroying practically everything as he was in DMC and DMC3, but he's still a decent character and his interactions with Dante are what really push along the sense of Dante's humanity. Mundus feels a bit like a pastiche of Marvel's Kingpin, but I think it's excusable given the franchise's previous examples of primary antagonists.

But, this is Devil May Cry we're talking about here, and nobody cares about the writing in Devil May Cry (apparently I'm the only one who doesn't care about the writing in Devil May Cry according to internet forums), so the real question then focuses on the gameplay. Does it feel like Devil May Cry? And it's a bit of a complicated question to answer, because various people stipulate what defined the gameplay of the franchise before in different ways. Some people believe that the insane difficulty is what made the games what they were, and I'm not entirely sure I agree with that. I've always had issues with damage-sponge enemies in games, and the higher difficulties of the past DMC games were no stranger to making enemies into virtual tanks, even for the pathetic cannon fodder ones there solely for you to rack up your Style meter.

Oh, this is gonna sting.
Oh, this is gonna sting.

What's always been the defining feature of the franchise for me was the smooth combat, with the ability to rapidly switch between weapons and chain elaborate combos essentially on the fly with a simple control scheme. On that point, I can't fault DmC. The combat system is surprisingly fast and fluid, and though the control scheme has changed rather dramatically since DMC4, it remains intuitive and simplistic. Above all, it's simply fun. The moves Dante can pull off are ridiculous, and the swift pace of the combat itself leads to some situations that feel very similar to the action sequences Capcom always deemed too cool to let the player control in the older Devil May Cry games.

The largest changes come perhaps in the lack of a lock-on system and the way switching weapons actually works. Dante is always equipped with his sword, Rebellion, and receives weapons sorted into three categories as you progress through the story - Angel Weapons, Demon Weapons, and guns. Instead of switching out Rebellion for another melee weapon, holding the corresponding trigger buttons will switch Dante into an Angel or Demon mode that smoothly swaps out Rebellion for another weapon and continues your combo instantaneously.

These Angel and Demon modes actually play into more than simply switching weapons, though it's never particularly explained all that well. There are certain enemies (which are helpfully color-coded) that can only be damaged by an Angel or Demon weapon, and patches of fiery ground that one enemy lays down can be negated by being in the Demon mode. Dante also receives two types of whips; An Angel whip which pulls him toward targets, and a Demon whip that pulls targets toward him. This plays into both the combat and platforming elements of the game, and really allowed the world designers to go crazy with how they structured the missions.

The lack of a lock-on is both a blessing and a curse. In some cases, it becomes incredibly annoying when you're trying to target a specific enemy but they're grouped up with a bunch of other enemies; However, in this situation it's not really any more annoying than trying to cycle through targets to lock on to the proper one. No, the biggest change effected by the missing lock-on is how you perform moves like Stinger (a long-distance closer attack) or High Rise (an uppercut that sends enemies into the air). As they couldn't have people accidentally doing the moves when they didn't want to, the button previously used for Style-specific moves in the previous games has been rebound to using High Rise and the other special moves Angel/Demon weapons have, while the closing move is done by a movement modifier before the attack - Namely, pressing towards whichever direction you want to move in swiftly twice. It's a bit unwieldy, especially when compared to the fluidity of the rest of the combat system, and the Angel whip renders it as a very situation-specific move to use, but it's certainly not completely useless.

I hope that nightclub has insurance against damage by axes. Yes, that's a nightclub. Limbo really makes a mark on the world.
I hope that nightclub has insurance against damage by axes. Yes, that's a nightclub. Limbo really makes a mark on the world.

Challenge most assuredly still exists. The game may not be as punishingly unfair as the rest of the franchise, but working your way up through the unlockable difficulty levels still presents a challenge far beyond what most other big-name titles are doing these days. I suppose to a person who has continuously played Devil May Cry 3 on "Dante Must Die" for the last seven years, DmC would likely present them with little difficulty, but even as a veteran of the franchise myself, having spent much of my gaming time with other games (non-hack&slash, I feel I should mention) over the past few years has left me a bit rusty and the game still provides me with a very enjoyable balance of difficulty to fun. Getting to an S-ranked combo is fairly simple, but reaching SSS still requires you to vary up your attacks and refrain from taking damage, and obtaining SSS ranks for missions on "Son of Sparda" (the game's Hard mode) or "Dante Must Die" is still a significant feat.

For the masochists, DmC also includes "Heaven and Hell", a mode in which everything dies in one attack, and "Hell and Hell", a mode in which Dante dies in one attack but enemies are as powerful as their "Son of Sparda" counterparts.

The combat has always been the central focus of Devil May Cry, but I hear some of you asking about the puzzles and platforming that were always featured as well, especially given the teasing mention of platforming that I've already made. Well, Ninja Theory decided (probably wisely) to stray away from the convoluted puzzles that always ruined the flow of gameplay in the previous games. No timed jumping puzzles for us here, guys. Well... not quite, at least. The way Limbo has been implemented, there are segments of the game that require you to platform across the level by way of the whips or an air dash in a certain amount of time, but the smoothness of movement and relatively simple layout of whip targets ensures that it never becomes a chore like that one room in Devil May Cry 4 with the spiked ceiling and lower floor that spawned new enemies every time you fell down. And as I mentioned before, the introduction of the whips means that the level designers really had an opportunity to flex their creative muscles, and flex they did.

Every mission (with the exception of missions solely focused on boss encounters) features several collectibles - challenge doors, keys which are used to open said challenge doors, and lost souls that you kill for Red Orbs (the "currency" of the game). Many of these collectibles are behind paths that you won't actually be able to take your first time through, and a number of them are surprisingly well-hidden, engendering a high amount of replayability to those completionists who just can't rest easy if a mission isn't 100% completed.

Outta the way, outta the way, outta the way!
Outta the way, outta the way, outta the way!

DmC is absolutely gorgeous to watch in action, as well. Truly grotesque bosses clash spectacularly with beautiful backdrops, and while the argument can be made that there's more style than substance, that's really no different than the previous entries of the franchise. From dilapidated city streets to a mirror world through the water, a demonic nightclub and a hellish business building (or would that be business as usual?), the environments pop out in a way that hasn't really been a trademark of the franchise before. Sure, the Gothic Resident Evil-esque architecture of the first three games was relatively unique, but nothing exactly stood out in the games themselves. And none of them had the same level of vivid coloring that Limbo expresses over the course of the twenty missions in DmC.

As a game in itself, DmC is some of the most fun I've had in a long time. The quickness of combat, the variety of enemies that require you to mix and match your weapons, and the interesting level design (for a hack&slash game) have ensured that even through three complete play-throughs, I haven't gotten bored. As a Devil May Cry game, it stands head and shoulders above the first two and runs neck and neck with the latter two. The characters are different, the gameplay is slightly different, but it's all still good and it all still feels like Devil May Cry. It's rare that a game makes me feel like playing through again on a higher difficulty right after I've finished it, but DmC accomplished that spectacularly, and even while I'm writing all of this I still feel like I haven't quite gotten enough of it yet. If Ninja Theory are given the reigns to continue on with this new branding of the Devil May Cry franchise, then I for one am excited to see where it is taken.

And for everyone whose biggest complaint about the new Dante is his hair color, you unlock him with slightly longer white hair after you've beaten the game once.
And for everyone whose biggest complaint about the new Dante is his hair color, you unlock him with slightly longer white hair after you've beaten the game once.

I'm just...I'm so lost with the reception of this game. I even like the new Dante design, really, and I'm still sitting here in awe of how average my experience has turned out to be.

I mean, this is well written? Really? I adored the opening segment, it was utterly hilarious, but after that mission the writers obviously stopped putting in the effort. I'm sitting there hanging on Dante's every word, like, "here comes the gold!" and he never delivers. It's not even that hard to do, just give me more of the "Fuck you" volleys and some dubstep, it's all I was asking for. But his personality vanishes after the introduction. It disappears.

And the combat, it's like complete autopilot -- no one else thinks so? I'm not even good at hack&slash and it's fairly simple for me to get into infinite air cancels. I'm maxing out the Style meter and I'm not even sure how. And the lack of lock on really limits my options in how I approach groups of enemies. Beautiful move set animations but really, it feels like you're dunking on preschoolers.

I feel so alone in saying this game is just alright. So very alone.

holdthephone:
I'm just...I'm so lost with the reception of this game. I even like the new Dante design, really, and I'm still sitting here in awe of how average my experience has turned out to be.

I mean, this is well written? Really? I adored the opening segment, it was utterly hilarious, but after that mission the writers obviously stopped putting in the effort. I'm sitting there hanging on Dante's every word, like, "here comes the gold!" and he never delivers. It's not even that hard to do, just give me more of the "Fuck you" volleys and some dubstep, it's all I was asking for. But his personality vanishes after the introduction. It disappears.

I'm not going to hold up the writing against games like Bioshock, Portal, The Witcher 2, or the like and say that it's good, but for a Devil May Cry or Capcom game in general, it's above average.

And the combat, it's like complete autopilot -- no one else thinks so? I'm not even good at hack&slash and it's fairly simple for me to get into infinite air cancels. I'm maxing out the Style meter and I'm not even sure how. And the lack of lock on really limits my options in how I approach groups of enemies. Beautiful move set animations but really, it feels like you're dunking on preschoolers.

I feel so alone in saying this game is just alright. So very alone.

On that I'll have to disagree. On "Son of Sparda" or "Dante Must Die", I at the very least need to employ judicious use of dodging and alternating weapons to ensure that I'm keeping enemies controlled or out of range while they're telegraphing attacks. Sure, the cannon fodder enemies are pretty simple to round up and dispatch, but I feel like that's how it should be.

The Style meter might be a tad too forgiving in that it doesn't go down any steps, waiting a long time while it empties and then waiting even longer before disappearing and then waiting a few more seconds still before it actually resets, but actually getting the amount of Style points for a SSS-rank in a mission on "Son of Sparda" or "Dante Must Die" still feels like a challenge to me.

But then, I'm not particularly all that good at hack&slash games either. The Devil May Cry franchise have been the only games in the genre capable of holding my interest for longer than a few hours, so the experience is probably different for other people.

I'm not going to hold up the writing against games like Bioshock, Portal, The Witcher 2, or the like and say that it's good, but for a Devil May Cry or Capcom game in general, it's above average.

I don't agree with lowering standards on a developer to developer basis, but that's your call.

On that I'll have to disagree. On "Son of Sparda" or "Dante Must Die", I at the very least need to employ judicious use of dodging and alternating weapons to ensure that I'm keeping enemies controlled or out of range while they're telegraphing attacks. Sure, the cannon fodder enemies are pretty simple to round up and dispatch, but I feel like that's how it should be.

Ultra hard is hard, you're right (unfortunately you have to unlock it first). This is why I mention lock on. The lack of it never bothered you? Did you ever notice that you can't engage the target you want out of a large group? It's always a gamble, which is very frustrating when you're committed to playing on the hardest difficulties. You approach a few enemies and you don't know which Dante will latch to. That's not good design, it can outright kill the player if he's unlucky.

holdthephone:

Ultra hard is hard, you're right (unfortunately you have to unlock it first). This is why I mention lock on. The lack of it never bothered you? Did you ever notice that you can't engage the target you want out of a large group? It's always a gamble, which is very frustrating when you're committed to playing on the hardest difficulties. You approach a few enemies and you don't know which Dante will latch to. That's not good design, it can outright kill the player if he's unlucky.

In the 36 hours of time I've spent playing the game so far, the only time the lack of a lock-on has bothered me was when I'm trying to knock Harpies out of the air. Granted, I haven't completely beaten "Dante Must Die" yet. I generally use wide-sweeping attacks when I'm in a group and single out the more difficult enemies so they're not surrounded by the guys I'm clearing, so it's never been a problem trying to target specific enemies. Also, he's always seemed to go for either the closest enemy or the enemy nearest to whichever direction I happen to be holding toward, so it's been relatively easy for me to predict how to continue my attack pattern ahead of time.

I felt that the way the lock-on mechanic worked in Devil May Cry 3 was more detrimental to the gameplay than helpful, anyway. It has the same issues as the lack of a lock-on, because if you want to target a specific enemy you'll need to spend a lot of time cycling through, and while locked on Dante moves a lot slower so you're basically painting a massive target sign over his head the entire time.

Your method works, but I guess don't agree with having to clear a space free of grunts just so the camera will work properly. As you said, you want to eliminate the biggest threat first, but before that step it seems you need to clear the target area so it won't confuse the camera. It's rarely an issue as to get you killed, I just find that it limits my creativity and speed, because the first approach will always have to involve a sweeping attack so you can clear space and get the auto lock-on working efficiently. It also means that when I'm wailing on one enemy and I knock him farther than another, it'll force me to break lock on and give me a new enemy. I lose track of what guys are down to what HP, since I'm always being forced to exchange targets for closer ones. And god help us all if there's flying enemies in the battle too.

And just a note, I am offering no defense of older DMC games, nor am I saying this new one is better or worse. By all means, pick DMC3's lock-on feature apart.

shrekfan246:
See, if I got it, I would've hated the game like everyone else does. So I must not get it and be the weird one out, because nobody who liked the previous games could possibly like this one too, because it's an insult to the franchise (I guess it doesn't fill the franchise's soul with LIIIIIIGHT) and an insult to the fans of the franchise!

I guess you failed pretty hard here by looking at the game by its own merits and daring to go at the game with an open, and more importantly, your own mind. Also you probably forgot to bring your "It's different, so it sucks" checklist while playing so you probably missed a whole bunch of small changes to the holy DMC lore that obviously ruin the game because you were to distracted with "enjoying what you get".

Yep, you really messed up here, buddy.

Seriously?

You opened your review with a "people who hate this game are still hung up on Dante's hair and don't know a good thing when it hits them" that every other reviewer under the sun is using? And also used when Mass Effect 3 didn't deliver on its developers' promises?

The rest of your review was fine, but why in the holy mother of fuck did you think that that was funny or insightful or anything other than a cheap shot that still missed the mark?

It stained my impression of your review a lot. Like the E3 trailer of this game. There's not a lot of "FUCK YOU" or dubstep in the game, but that was in the first showing of the game, and that on its own probably turned off a few people who didn't have any ties to Devil May Cry, too.

Some people actually do have grievances with the game, and have played it enough to know what those are. Trying to say that everyone who hates the game hasn't played it just because of Dante's hair makes you no better than 90% of the games journalism industry.

This review was really nicely done, congrats:)

I just started playing it (Master Race version) and I really like what I've played so far.

I do hate Dante's initial cockiness though, but hopefully he will grow on me.

The only other DMC game I've played was DMC3 so I guess one of the reasons I don't hate it is because I don't have much investment in the series...

holdthephone:

I mean, this is well written? Really? I adored the opening segment, it was utterly hilarious, but after that mission the writers obviously stopped putting in the effort. I'm sitting there hanging on Dante's every word, like, "here comes the gold!" and he never delivers. It's not even that hard to do, just give me more of the "Fuck you" volleys and some dubstep, it's all I was asking for. But his personality vanishes after the introduction. It disappears.

I've made that very same observation too.

The impression I got from this new Dante from press footage was that he was a mean, abrasive, loudmouth. And for the intro, this is the way he is. Which if anything, was at least entertaining.

But after the introduction, Dante just becomes.... boring. His bitter snark and abrasive attitude just seem to vanish.

He'll make a quip every now and then, but I don't remember ever getting a chuckle out of them.

And hell I didn't mind Dante's redesign. Since I knew it was a coming-of-age story where he'll have white hair by the end of, anyway. And even then, his design didn't strike me as bad. I was ready to enjoy this new Dante, but I just ended up not caring or even being amused by him.

holdthephone:
And the combat, it's like complete autopilot -- no one else thinks so? I'm not even good at hack&slash and it's fairly simple for me to get into infinite air cancels. I'm maxing out the Style meter and I'm not even sure how. And the lack of lock on really limits my options in how I approach groups of enemies. Beautiful move set animations but really, it feels like you're dunking on preschoolers.

This is true. Even on DmD a majority of the enemy cast barely becomes a greater threat. As long as you are landing attacks and avoiding damage, you WILL get to SSS ranking without much effort. Sometimes you can immediately reach SSS ranking with a single combo.

holdthephone:
I feel so alone in saying this game is just alright. So very alone.

You know...

I am a big fan of the old franchise, yes. But that doesn't mean I automatically wanted to bury this game. IF Capcom decided they wanted another studio to handle this franchise, then fine. I want more Devil May Cry after all, and I wanted this game to be good.

But after playing the game, (especially on higher difficulties) the game pretty much falls apart as I play it.

Looking at the game on it's own merits, and holding it to the standards of what I want from a hack-n-slash/spectacle fighter, I give it a 6/10.

So, I agree. This game really is... just alright.

The action stays at "tepid" a majority of the time, and frequently reaches tedium. It never feels like it approaches high-levels of hack-n-slash/spectacle fighting greatness.

It has a lot of problems and questionable design choices. And Ninja Theory just didn't seem up to the task of handling this game series up to the standards set by the previous games, and the standards set by other hack-n-slash/spectacle fighters. As far as this genre goes, I can think of quite a few games that surpass it in nearly every meaningful aspect. If Ninja Theory is going to handle the franchise from now on, they did not get off to a good start in my eyes.

But I don't think this game is terrible. I still play this game from time to time. It just could've been way, way better, and I'm not happy about making that conclusion.

shrekfan246:
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And for everyone whose biggest complaint about the new Dante is his hair color, you unlock him with slightly longer white hair after you've beaten the game

It's funny, cause I did play with this costume from now on without ever returning to the original...

And yet, now that I got the skin pack, I find myself wanting to play the game even more.

For as much Tameem gassed on about Dante's old design being "uncool" and stupid, and how this new Dante would be better and cooler... Dante's old design remains superior without a doubt.

Ninja Theory, you sure did try to come up with a better design for Dante. But after seeing the 2 Dantes side-by-side, it's safe to say that ya blew it.

But maybe that's just me.

A good review in some parts apart from the opening where a poster above pointed out as mroe or less a jab at previous fans.

I want to like the game I do but it's just not really DMC to me as much as the old ones were and so if Capcom do continue with this direction then I can no longer go down their road and play future DmC titles.

Though I'll still enoy playing the DMC HD collection and play 1,3 and 4 to remember the good times.

IMO I'd still say the writing for 4 was great with the inclusion of Shakespeare segment.

I thought the story was great. I thought the game play was solid and very much what we've come to expect and love from the franchise.

Where the game fell on its face is the characterization. Old Dante was a douche bag. But a fun one. You liked watching his arrogant antics and his one liners.

This Dante is full on douche but without ANY of the fun. The love interest is two dimensional and forced. Hell, I can't even remember what her name is and I was just playing the game not 30 minutes ago. Virgil... I don't even know where to begin with Virgil.

I'd say get the game for the hack n slash. But skip the cut scenes.

leet_x1337:
Seriously?

You opened your review with a "people who hate this game are still hung up on Dante's hair and don't know a good thing when it hits them" that every other reviewer under the sun is using? And also used when Mass Effect 3 didn't deliver on its developers' promises?

The rest of your review was fine, but why in the holy mother of fuck did you think that that was funny or insightful or anything other than a cheap shot that still missed the mark?

It stained my impression of your review a lot. Like the E3 trailer of this game. There's not a lot of "FUCK YOU" or dubstep in the game, but that was in the first showing of the game, and that on its own probably turned off a few people who didn't have any ties to Devil May Cry, too.

Some people actually do have grievances with the game, and have played it enough to know what those are. Trying to say that everyone who hates the game hasn't played it just because of Dante's hair makes you no better than 90% of the games journalism industry.

Actually I ended it with "people are still hung up on Dante's hair".

The opening was just a quip about "it changed, now it sucks!" in general, because the jab was at the writing in the very first game.

I completely get that people have legitimate grievances about the game. Frankly, it is quite a bit easier than previous Devil May Cry games, Vergil has changed dramatically, the writing has a far more serious tone, and the lack of a lock-on really switches around how the combat actually works. If that's enough to make them despise this game, then fine for them.

I just think they're going to be missing out on a damn fine game, because in my opinion it is still a Devil May Cry game. One of the better ones, even.

shrekfan246:

I completely get that people have legitimate grievances about the game. Frankly, it is quite a bit easier than previous Devil May Cry games, Vergil has changed dramatically, the writing has a far more serious tone, and the lack of a lock-on really switches around how the combat actually works. If that's enough to make them despise this game, then fine for them.

Don't forget the several gamebreaking glitches:

lapan:

lapan:

shrekfan246:

I completely get that people have legitimate grievances about the game. Frankly, it is quite a bit easier than previous Devil May Cry games, Vergil has changed dramatically, the writing has a far more serious tone, and the lack of a lock-on really switches around how the combat actually works. If that's enough to make them despise this game, then fine for them.

Don't forget the several gamebreaking glitches:

lapan:

I've only seen one of those glitches -

- But it was easily sorted by doing the boss the way he's normally supposed to be killed on the next round where he went down.

Sure, my experience isn't indicative of everyone's experiences, but neither are the videos of those glitches. Pretty much every game is going to have some bugs stuck in the system. It's not really excusable, but it's not really something I can fault them for either, especially when I've only encountered one significant glitch in 36 hours.

shrekfan246:

I've only seen one of those glitches -

- But it was easily sorted by doing the boss the way he's normally supposed to be killed on the next round where he went down.

Sure, my experience isn't indicative of everyone's experiences, but neither are the videos of those glitches. Pretty much every game is going to have some bugs stuck in the system. It's not really excusable, but it's not really something I can fault them for either, especially when I've only encountered one significant glitch in 36 hours.

http://www.capcom-unity.com/gregaman/blog/2013/02/01/dmc-pc-patch-details

Apparently they fixed some of the bugs i mentioned in the PC version now. No news to when/if the consoles get that patch too.

shrekfan246:

leet_x1337:
Seriously?

You opened your review with a "people who hate this game are still hung up on Dante's hair and don't know a good thing when it hits them" that every other reviewer under the sun is using? And also used when Mass Effect 3 didn't deliver on its developers' promises?

The rest of your review was fine, but why in the holy mother of fuck did you think that that was funny or insightful or anything other than a cheap shot that still missed the mark?

It stained my impression of your review a lot. Like the E3 trailer of this game. There's not a lot of "FUCK YOU" or dubstep in the game, but that was in the first showing of the game, and that on its own probably turned off a few people who didn't have any ties to Devil May Cry, too.

Some people actually do have grievances with the game, and have played it enough to know what those are. Trying to say that everyone who hates the game hasn't played it just because of Dante's hair makes you no better than 90% of the games journalism industry.

Actually I ended it with "people are still hung up on Dante's hair".

The opening was just a quip about "it changed, now it sucks!" in general, because the jab was at the writing in the very first game.

I completely get that people have legitimate grievances about the game. Frankly, it is quite a bit easier than previous Devil May Cry games, Vergil has changed dramatically, the writing has a far more serious tone, and the lack of a lock-on really switches around how the combat actually works. If that's enough to make them despise this game, then fine for them.

I just think they're going to be missing out on a damn fine game, because in my opinion it is still a Devil May Cry game. One of the better ones, even.

I have a long list of problems with DMC. The hair is one of the lowest. Yet, I'd have been more willing to give the game a shot if Ninja Theory didn't spend their entire P.R. time saying that the FANS ARE TO FUCKING BLAME. They spent every second of marketing insulting and belittling the people who played the games and I wasn't going to waste my money on a game I was 50/50 on since the demo to pay for that kind of immature bullshit.

The real problem with DMC is that it loses all of the camp of the old games.
I miss the campy, cheesy writing. So many people seem to think it was an unintentional side effect of poor writing, but it's absolutely an intentional style, much like the Adam West Batman series. The style is "camp" and so, so many studios today have completely abandoned the style, across all forms of media. DMC (along with Bayonetta) were nearly the last two game series that really embraced it. Now with the remake, it's all gone.

I'm going to have to make a whole thread for this point, but people really need to stop saying that This game's writing is better than the last few DMC games when it is thematically more broken than three, four, and possibly even two. The damn title doesn't even have meaning anymore and somehow this game's writing is better than the other ones? The whole angle of Dante's humanity giving him the edge which ties into the title is completely gone from this game. Mundus' plans are silly because it does not make any sense for him to go through the trouble of doing things through subterfuge when he is a "god". It isn't silly in the same way that Lollipop Chainsaw is silly. It is silly in a way that destroys suspension of disbelief, all in an effort to remind us that financiers are evil; the game is entirely serious with its' premise but the premise is completely illogical when you consider what Mundus is in this universe. I'm still not even sure what the point of the whole angel thing is since Dante only has a Devil Trigger and his angelic nature is essentially never touched on in any real way.

 

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