Was there a real world example of "Nobles/Prince/Princess" defying an arranged marriage?

Defying an arranged marriage just to follow what their heart tells them to? Because we have all seen that story told many times in Disney films alone. But was there any real world example that a noble refuses an arranged suitor to find thier own love? I ask this because I feel like perhaps this was not the case at all and it was done as a method of criticism against Dynastic politics in Monarchies and such. But does that criticism have real world precendent to fall behind?

I also would think that if such things did occur, that how did it not bring about the downfall of entire feudal dynasties? Them not marrying a suitor and leaving a legitimate heir to the throne would lead to Civil War as it usually was the case in Feudal governments, and any offspring these nobles would have with thier "one true love" would be deemed a bastard and illegitimate.

Usually when such a thing happened it is not well known. People don't tend to prepare a big expensive noble marriage ceremony if they think the marriage won't happen.

There are many many instances where people tried to arrange marriages but it never came to it. But the reason is rarely clear. Why would you tell the whole world that your son/daughter is a spoiled brat or that the next generation of important people you wanted to have an allience can't stand each other ? Or that the other family is too poor/weak for you ? Or that your strategic interests shifted during negotiation ?

There are a couple of known cases but the majority is probably not known.

What happens if a marriage can't be arrenged ? The parents look for another marriage opportunity and usually they will find one eventually. To turn down one person does not mean to turn down all of them.

If someone really really did not want to marry, the "acceptable" was going to the church and let the continuation of the family line and titles to someone else. If the rules of succession can handle a heir suddenly dying they can also handle this.

I don't know of any examples of royalty reneging out of an arranged marriage to marry for love, but there are several historical examples of a prince marrying someone against the wishes of his father/the monarch.

Like Archduke Ferdinand (1529-1595), son of Austrian emperor Ferdinand I, who secretly married Phillipine Welsner, a merchants daughters from Augsburg. She came from an admittedly very wealthy banker family , but had no noble title whatsoever. To get his father to agree to accept a marriage of such unequal social rank, Ferdinand has to renounce all claims to the throne and he and his wife had to sign a declaration that whatever children they would produce would legally be considered foundlings i.e. not blood-related.

There's also Archduke Johann (1782-1859), son of Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II and younger brother of Holy Roman Emperor Francis II, who married the daughter of a postmaster: Anna Plochl. That didn't go over well with the family, cuz you know, commoner and not even a rich one. Johann asked his brother's permission to marry her. Big bro said no fucking way. Johann kept asking, all the while getting other more suitable marriage offers for someone of his rank. Big bro finally caved after 11 years.

Edward IV of England secretly married Elizabeth Woodville while the Earl of Warwick was trying to arrange a match for him with a french noble

There is the case of King Edward VIII abdicating the throne in 1936 when he fell in love with Wallis Simpson, who was not only an american but also a already married woman who had been divorced.

Worgen:
There is the case of King Edward VIII abdicating the throne in 1936 when he fell in love with Wallis Simpson, who was not only an american but also a already married woman who had been divorced.

I think after the Victorian era the idea of royalty and nobility just lost all its teeth, probably why such things became incredibly more common after the 1900s.

CyanCat47:
Edward IV of England secretly married Elizabeth Woodville while the Earl of Warwick was trying to arrange a match for him with a french noble

That's just Richard III's propaganda machine at work.

Abomination:

Worgen:
There is the case of King Edward VIII abdicating the throne in 1936 when he fell in love with Wallis Simpson, who was not only an american but also a already married woman who had been divorced.

I think after the Victorian era the idea of royalty and nobility just lost all its teeth, probably why such things became incredibly more common after the 1900s.

Which is a shame because they were so petty and fucked up by their upbringing and inbreeding that it made for some absurdly Hilarious situations. My favourite is when Tsar Ferdinand of Bulgaria was visiting his cousin Wilhelm II. One day Willhelm approached Ferdinand from behind while he was looking out of a window and slapped him on the ass, then refused to apologize. This actually had political reprocussions as Ferdinand gave a national arms contract to a french company instead of a german one

CyanCat47:
Which is a shame because they were so petty and fucked up by their upbringing and inbreeding that it made for some absurdly Hilarious situations. My favourite is when Tsar Ferdinand of Bulgaria was visiting his cousin Wilhelm II. One day Willhelm approached Ferdinand from behind while he was looking out of a window and slapped him on the ass, then refused to apologize. This actually had political reprocussions as Ferdinand gave a national arms contract to a french company instead of a german one

Eeeeeh, I would rather NOT have a bunch of inbred mongoloids as the head of state. I mean, we are enjoying that present scenario already with Trump (I thought democracy was supposed to PREVENT this type of thing from happening, not enable it).

Samtemdo8:
Defying an arranged marriage just to follow what their heart tells them to?

Well, there was a novel (& film) fairly recently called "The Other Boleyn Girl". It's about Mary Boleyn, whose sister Anne married Henry VIII. Some time later, Mary secretly married a man of much lower station against the wishes of her family... and her family cut her off for it.

Generally, a nobleman who married against family wishes might be in the doghouse over it, but ultimately he's still carrying the family name and family hopes, has opportunity to make a career for himself, and a fair chance of getting away with it in the long term. A noblewoman marrying without permission had better marry a man of good standing (which will protect her because she'll take his standing), or fair chance she's going to be disowned.

The problem was perhaps more marrying below one's station than marrying without parental arrangement.

Abomination:

CyanCat47:
Which is a shame because they were so petty and fucked up by their upbringing and inbreeding that it made for some absurdly Hilarious situations. My favourite is when Tsar Ferdinand of Bulgaria was visiting his cousin Wilhelm II. One day Willhelm approached Ferdinand from behind while he was looking out of a window and slapped him on the ass, then refused to apologize. This actually had political reprocussions as Ferdinand gave a national arms contract to a french company instead of a german one

Eeeeeh, I would rather NOT have a bunch of inbred mongoloids as the head of state. I mean, we are enjoying that present scenario already with Trump (I thought democracy was supposed to PREVENT this type of thing from happening, not enable it).

No, our system of government is designed to limit the damage it can do since it takes forever to do anything so unless someone manages to get a congress and house that will just kowtow to their demands and is able to stack the court then... Oh, yeah point taken.

Abomination:
Eeeeeh, I would rather NOT have a bunch of inbred mongoloids as the head of state.

So would you rather have a bunch of inbred caucasoids and/or negroids instead?

OT: Defiance of royal arranged marriages is probably the rarest of results... you're definitely more likely to find arranged marriages that actually worked well (i.e. the couple actually loved each other, for the sake of semantics). Still not that many, mind you, most were simply functional, a substantial minority were tense, while a lesser minority were outright cold/hostile. That said, you can simply link them to morganatic marriages and leave it at that...

Arranged marriages have different traditions depending on what part of the world you find yourself, some cultures only allow parents to marry their children in collaboration, meaning that their children would have to ask their parents to start the arrangements on their behalf.

Like mentioned above, preparations for a wedding would usually not start until there was an actual "Yes." from both parties involved, and in aristocracy marriages were quite pragmatic in nature, you didn't JUST pick someone you loved, you picked someone you liked enough and was a valuable companion in your political climate, that itself builds a bond.

Agema:

Samtemdo8:
Defying an arranged marriage just to follow what their heart tells them to?

Well, there was a novel (& film) fairly recently called "The Other Boleyn Girl". It's about Mary Boleyn, whose sister Anne married Henry VIII. Some time later, Mary secretly married a man of much lower station against the wishes of her family... and her family cut her off for it.

Generally, a nobleman who married against family wishes might be in the doghouse over it, but ultimately he's still carrying the family name and family hopes, has opportunity to make a career for himself, and a fair chance of getting away with it in the long term. A noblewoman marrying without permission had better marry a man of good standing (which will protect her because she'll take his standing), or fair chance she's going to be disowned.

The problem was perhaps more marrying below one's station than marrying without parental arrangement.

It is also a rather English perspective, in many areas on the continent a man marrying below his station would also lose it. Primary title holders of both sexes are obviously except, those would at worst make their title less meaningful or invite challanges.

One should also keep in mind that rules about interitence and who holds the property in a marriage vastly differed from country to country and hardly anywhere okzidental it was as one-sided as in England/Great Britain.

As for which station is fitting, theoretically monarch families should mary into souverain families, but in practice powerful Dukes were good enough. High nobility should only marry high nobility, low nobility only low nobility, that was generally followed and exceptions were seen as a bit scandalous. Where the line between high and low nobility exactly is had rather strict rules - which were again slightly different in England (and in several other countries).

Stratification of nobility also occured rather late. If you go into actually medieval times, not early modern period, you will find far more matches across rank types.

Worgen:
No, our system of government is designed to limit the damage it can do since it takes forever to do anything so unless someone manages to get a congress and house that will just kowtow to their demands and is able to stack the court then... Oh, yeah point taken.

Still gets far more done than the Polish elective monarchy. Now that was a system with some serious blocking ability.

 

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