Cop breaks into black man's house and murders him, put on administrative leave.

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https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/dallas-officer-enters-apartment-she-mistakes-her-own-fatally-shoots-n907411

An officer when attempting to return home, found that she could not get into 'her own apartment', so she breaks in and shoots the guy there, killing him. Oh and yeah, the guy is black.

What is the response to this? Put her on administrative leave.

She should be tried and convicted of breaking and entering, and murder!

How did she mistake her Apartmant home for someone elses?

Samtemdo8:
How did she mistake her Apartmant home for someone elses?

Yeah, just because its the same apartment complex doesn't mean the keys work. But chances are she'll get off. The investigation will say it was a good shoot, that the officer had cause to fear for her life, and that the man really was black.

So...imagine you're the victim in this scenario.

You're puttering around your apartment one evening, probably in your underpants, maybe contemplating whether to go to bed or watch Netflix. Then a uniformed police officer walks in, says "Get out of my apartment!" and shoots you.

What the fuck is wrong with America?!

Wow, this happened like 30 minutes from where I live. It's also sickening. How blatant a double-standard?? If I "mistakenly" shoot and kill anyone, even if the law applied as fairly as possible, I would be in JAIL. IMMEDIATELY. Behind bars pending investigation and hearing. And in reality, as a man of brown skin, I would likely have been forcibly taken down if not shot dead by responding officers, even if I called 911 to report the "little whoopsie" myself. I'd be lucky to make it to a jail cell.

I don't generally have an issue with the cops, and as hard as it is sometimes, I always try to assume the best about them. On its face, the job is a thankless and dangerous one; I can only hope that those willing to "serve and protect" can be objective and fair, but then you read something like this and it BEGS the question: how blind can the law possibly be when it so often SEES a clear distinction between "us" and those serving under its banner? I disputed a speeding ticket once (and I'm a notorious speeder who's paid numerous ticket without question knowing full well I was at fault,) and when I gave my side of the story to the judge, his question to me, verbatim: "You expect me to believe my officer is lying?" I was stunned! When I recovered, I simply told him "no, your honor, but I DO expect you to believe 'your officer' can be mistaken." Needless to say, I ended up having to pay the ticket AND court fees.

This is simply unfair; my heart goes out to that poor man and his family. To think that a similar, fatal "mistake" on his part would easily have cost him his freedom if not his LIFE while this woman essentially gets a paid vacation...

Yeah, this should be a pretty open and shut case for manslaughter at minimum, and the surrounding circumstances do nothing but exacerbate the severity of the issue. Administrative leave is practically spitting in the face of the law.

Xprimentyl:
Wow, this happened like 30 minutes from where I live. It?s also sickening. How blatant a double-standard?? If I ?mistakenly? shoot and kill anyone, even if the law applied as fairly as possible, I would be in JAIL. IMMEDIATELY. Behind bars pending investigation and hearing. And in reality, as a man of brown skin, I would likely have been forcibly taken down if not shot dead by responding officers, even if I called 911 to report the ?little whoopsie? myself. I?d be lucky to make it to a jail cell.

I don?t generally have an issue with the cops, and as hard as it is sometimes, I always try to assume the best about them. On its face, the job is a thankless and dangerous one; I can only hope that those willing to ?serve and protect? can be objective and fair, but then you read something like this and it BEGS the question: how blind can the law possibly be when it so often SEES a clear distinction between ?us? and those serving under its banner? I disputed a speeding ticket once (and I?m a notorious speeder who?s paid numerous ticket without question knowing full well I was at fault,) and when I gave my side of the story to the judge, his question to me, verbatim: ?You expect me to believe my officer is lying?? I was stunned! When I recovered, I simply told him ?no, your honor, but I DO expect you to believe ?your officer? can be mistaken.? Needless to say, I ended up having to pay the ticket AND court fees.

This is simply unfair; my heart goes out to that poor man and his family. To think that a similar, fatal ?mistake? on his part would easily have cost him his freedom if not his LIFE while this woman essentially gets a paid vacation?

I remember a few years back when that shooter was loose in Dallas, and the Dallas police chief gave a press conference where he said his #1 priority was the safety of his officers.
And I was shocked. That is not the job of the police. The police put their lives on the line to protect civilians, that's their job. His #1 priority should have been the safety of the public.

Asita:
Yeah, this should be a pretty open and shut case for manslaughter at minimum, and the surrounding circumstances do nothing but exacerbate the severity of the issue. Administrative leave is practically spitting in the face of the law.

Honestly I'd give it even money she doesn't get charged, or at least is found not guilty.

Silentpony:

Xprimentyl:
Wow, this happened like 30 minutes from where I live. It?s also sickening. How blatant a double-standard?? If I ?mistakenly? shoot and kill anyone, even if the law applied as fairly as possible, I would be in JAIL. IMMEDIATELY. Behind bars pending investigation and hearing. And in reality, as a man of brown skin, I would likely have been forcibly taken down if not shot dead by responding officers, even if I called 911 to report the ?little whoopsie? myself. I?d be lucky to make it to a jail cell.

I don?t generally have an issue with the cops, and as hard as it is sometimes, I always try to assume the best about them. On its face, the job is a thankless and dangerous one; I can only hope that those willing to ?serve and protect? can be objective and fair, but then you read something like this and it BEGS the question: how blind can the law possibly be when it so often SEES a clear distinction between ?us? and those serving under its banner? I disputed a speeding ticket once (and I?m a notorious speeder who?s paid numerous ticket without question knowing full well I was at fault,) and when I gave my side of the story to the judge, his question to me, verbatim: ?You expect me to believe my officer is lying?? I was stunned! When I recovered, I simply told him ?no, your honor, but I DO expect you to believe ?your officer? can be mistaken.? Needless to say, I ended up having to pay the ticket AND court fees.

This is simply unfair; my heart goes out to that poor man and his family. To think that a similar, fatal ?mistake? on his part would easily have cost him his freedom if not his LIFE while this woman essentially gets a paid vacation?

I remember a few years back when that shooter was loose in Dallas, and the Dallas police chief gave a press conference where he said his #1 priority was the safety of his officers.
And I was shocked. That is not the job of the police. The police put their lives on the line to protect civilians, that's their job. His #1 priority should have been the safety of the public.

According to the Supreme Court the police have no obligation to protect anyone, therefore protecting people isn't actually their job. It's fucked up that you aren't supposed to have an expectation of protection from police.

Asita:
Yeah, this should be a pretty open and shut case for manslaughter at minimum, and the surrounding circumstances do nothing but exacerbate the severity of the issue. Administrative leave is practically spitting in the face of the law.

Not to mention breaking and entering.

Silentpony:

Asita:
Yeah, this should be a pretty open and shut case for manslaughter at minimum, and the surrounding circumstances do nothing but exacerbate the severity of the issue. Administrative leave is practically spitting in the face of the law.

Honestly I'd give it even money she doesn't get charged, or at least is found not guilty.

The AP is reporting the chief of Dallas PD will *seek* a manslaughter warrant for the officer.

https://twitter.com/AP/status/1038124951843287042

I stress the word "seek" -- the officer has NOT been arrested, or even questioned, and there's no guarantee charges will be brought.

For more on the questioning/interviewing aspect, read this 2014 article by Radley Balko. It's pretty eye-opening in its exploration of the different rules that exist for cops versus everyone else. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/opinions/wp/2014/01/22/do-cooling-off-periods-help-cops-remember-police-involved-shootings-more-accurately/

Also? This is either a bullshit cover story or the officer was intoxicated/incapacitated. You don't mistakenly break into someone's home thinking it's your own.

Exley97:

Also? This is either a bullshit cover story or the officer was intoxicated/incapacitated. You don't mistakenly break into someone's home thinking it's your own.

People ARE that stupid. The current state of the US is proof of that.

I no longer assume that people cannot be that stupid, because people can infact be that stupid.

Saelune:

Exley97:

Also? This is either a bullshit cover story or the officer was intoxicated/incapacitated. You don't mistakenly break into someone's home thinking it's your own.

People ARE that stupid. The current state of the US is proof of that.

I no longer assume that people cannot be that stupid, because people can infact be that stupid.

Dallas police tell me the just off shift officer who shot and killed a man in his own apartment, was on the WRONG FLOOR. HER apartment was on another floor. Her key didn't work in the door. Shooting happened shortly after resident opened his own door.— Steve Eagar (@steveeagar) September 7, 2018

https://twitter.com/steveeagar/status/1038083050264035328

So basically she 1) didn't know she was on the wrong floor, 2) didn't realize that her key not working was a huge red flag, 3) thought nothing of the fact that someone IN THE APARTMENT was responding to her banging on the door, and 4) assumed the *black man* who answered the door was a threat and fucking shot him dead.

Sorry, not buying it.

Exley97:

Saelune:

Exley97:

Also? This is either a bullshit cover story or the officer was intoxicated/incapacitated. You don't mistakenly break into someone's home thinking it's your own.

People ARE that stupid. The current state of the US is proof of that.

I no longer assume that people cannot be that stupid, because people can infact be that stupid.

Dallas police tell me the just off shift officer who shot and killed a man in his own apartment, was on the WRONG FLOOR. HER apartment was on another floor. Her key didn?t work in the door. Shooting happened shortly after resident opened his own door.— Steve Eagar (@steveeagar) September 7, 2018

https://twitter.com/steveeagar/status/1038083050264035328

So basically she 1) didn't know she was on the wrong floor, 2) didn't realize that her key not working was a huge red flag, 3) thought nothing of the fact that someone IN THE APARTMENT was responding to her banging on the door, and 4) assumed the *black man* who answered the door was a threat and fucking shot him dead.

Sorry, not buying it.

Don't get me wrong, I am not defending her, infact I am doing the opposite. Being drunk is not an excuse, but it would be used as one.

She is either
A) Stupid enough to murder an innocent person cause she is too dumb to find her own apartment, in which case she should be severely punished
B) Super racist, in which case she should be severely punished
C) Stupid enough to get drunk and murder an innocent persoan cause she is too dumb to find her own apartment, in which case she should be severely punished.

I suppose B is worse than A or C, but she should be put in jail and not be a cop anymore, AND police need to STOP BEING THE ENEMY OF JUSTICE!

Silentpony:

Asita:
Yeah, this should be a pretty open and shut case for manslaughter at minimum, and the surrounding circumstances do nothing but exacerbate the severity of the issue. Administrative leave is practically spitting in the face of the law.

Honestly I'd give it even money she doesn't get charged, or at least is found not guilty.

Clarification: I say "should be" in the sense of "by rights", not in the sense of "this will likely be".

Exley97:

Saelune:

Exley97:

Also? This is either a bullshit cover story or the officer was intoxicated/incapacitated. You don't mistakenly break into someone's home thinking it's your own.

People ARE that stupid. The current state of the US is proof of that.

I no longer assume that people cannot be that stupid, because people can infact be that stupid.

Dallas police tell me the just off shift officer who shot and killed a man in his own apartment, was on the WRONG FLOOR. HER apartment was on another floor. Her key didn?t work in the door. Shooting happened shortly after resident opened his own door.— Steve Eagar (@steveeagar) September 7, 2018

https://twitter.com/steveeagar/status/1038083050264035328

So basically she 1) didn't know she was on the wrong floor, 2) didn't realize that her key not working was a huge red flag, 3) thought nothing of the fact that someone IN THE APARTMENT was responding to her banging on the door, and 4) assumed the *black man* who answered the door was a threat and fucking shot him dead.

Sorry, not buying it.

So now it's no longer safe for a black man to answer his own door? Jesus fucking Christ... Michael Jackson was ahead of the curve; we black males almost NEED to disguise ourselves as white women to stand a fucking chance.

This woman, as a trained officer, should have had astute enough powers of observation to realize she was at the wrong apartment well before she decided to MURDER the person to whom it did belong because they answered the door (y'know, like ALL intruders do?) I hope they find out she was high, drunk or otherwise mentally incapacitated to strip any possibility of the badge justifying her actions and exonerating her.

This literally being so close to home, I sincerely hope this is handled as quickly and severely as it obviously, morally, ethically and legally should be. This may come as a surprise to no one, but Texas is a stubbornly conservative state, so many "folks 'round here" quite readily take the side of the staunchly conservative white -'erm- "RIGHT" when stuff like this happens; the cops are the "good guys," so anyone dead by their hand MUST have done something wrong and any mistakes are entirely explainable. I don't look forward to the stirrings and victim blaming that will inevitably come from the mouths of those who love "their own and guns" with an unsettling passion; we need the law to treat her like the criminal she is. NOW.

Exley97:

Saelune:

Exley97:

Also? This is either a bullshit cover story or the officer was intoxicated/incapacitated. You don't mistakenly break into someone's home thinking it's your own.

People ARE that stupid. The current state of the US is proof of that.

I no longer assume that people cannot be that stupid, because people can infact be that stupid.

Dallas police tell me the just off shift officer who shot and killed a man in his own apartment, was on the WRONG FLOOR. HER apartment was on another floor. Her key didn?t work in the door. Shooting happened shortly after resident opened his own door.— Steve Eagar (@steveeagar) September 7, 2018

https://twitter.com/steveeagar/status/1038083050264035328

So basically she 1) didn't know she was on the wrong floor, 2) didn't realize that her key not working was a huge red flag, 3) thought nothing of the fact that someone IN THE APARTMENT was responding to her banging on the door, and 4) assumed the *black man* who answered the door was a threat and fucking shot him dead.

Sorry, not buying it.

im starting to think this is a crazy cover story. the only way i can see this story be true is if she was really high or had some sort of mental ailment that should have disqualified her from service.
i am kind of curios about her "side" of the story.

Bugs me none of you have considered exhaustion as a factor. What if this is some sort of "straight off a double shift" walking dead mistake.

It's an important consideration because of the further implications of that department overworking their officers and having them in this state it would carry.

Like, it could be a severe problem instead of 1 drunk or dumb idiot. That's a huge problem.

Well he obviously went for her gun and she was fearful for her life.

/sarcasm

Elijin:
Bugs me none of you have considered exhaustion as a factor. What if this is some sort of "straight off a double shift" walking dead mistake.

It's an important consideration because of the further implications of that department overworking their officers and having them in this state it would carry.

Like, it could be a severe problem instead of 1 drunk or dumb idiot. That's a huge problem.

Here we go...

If "I was tired" is a reasonable excuse for being alert enough to take a life over one's own "tired" mistake, then I'm ready to blast off and leave "humanity" to it's own devices. Falling asleep at the wheel and killing someone is manslaughter. PERIOD. If you're not being facetious, I feel sorry for you. Cops, whether overworked or not, should be held to a higher standard of culpability if we authorize them to use lethal force at their own discretion.

Local news says she being charged with manslaughter; shes getting off easy. Fuck her.

Elijin:
Bugs me none of you have considered exhaustion as a factor. What if this is some sort of "straight off a double shift" walking dead mistake.

It's an important consideration because of the further implications of that department overworking their officers and having them in this state it would carry.

Like, it could be a severe problem instead of 1 drunk or dumb idiot. That's a huge problem.

A cop who is so tired, she's completely disorientated and lost. How did she drive to the apartment in such a state? How did she manage to walk in? It scares me to think cops can get so tired they just whip out their guns and start shooting everyone nearby.

More likely drunk, stumbling, can't clearly make out the numbers of the floors, sees a black man, gets scared, shoots him. Though I'm with the others that this seems like a really bad cover story, or that we're missing a huge puzzle piece, like the dude was her ex-boyfriend or something.

I don't even know what to say to crap like this anymore. The police here in the States need to be reformed, and their toxic fucking mindset of "we're in this together, it's us vs. them" needs to go away.

Update from about an hour ago: https://mic.com/articles/191173/dallas-police-shooting-botham-shem-jean#.d0j9ldAI5

Also some reports say that because her key didn't work due to her being on the wrong floor, she shot him when he opened the door. So, there's that little tidbit.

I have multiple questions as to how she could possibly mix up her apartment with another, and how she was able to get home. She's proper fucked regardless if there were drugs in her system or not. One would think the Dallas PD and Rangers would be very careful not to fuck this one up, and so far they really haven't, but given the track record with police involved shooting/homicide, I have my doubts.

Nedoras:
I don't even know what to say to crap like this anymore. The police here in the States need to be reformed, and their toxic fucking mindset of "we're in this together, it's us vs. them" needs to go away.

There used to be a cop at my old gym, ex-Marine sniper, deployed a few times, now a patrolman. He would often describe being on duty as a warzone, when he's on patrol he's on deployment, and multiple times said he saw no difference between patrolling the suburbs of St. Louis than a patrol in the nomads of Iraq.
That's part of the problem. Soldiers, trained only to kill, often become police, and surprise surprise they're response to a situation is to kill. I think serving in the military should be disqualifying for serving in the police. With the exception of SWAT there is nothing a military background should do to prepare you to write tickets and teach DARE. There should be no overlap between a patrolman and a Marine corps Sniper.
Barney Fife would not have been a better Deputy by being an ex-Navy SEAL.

Silentpony:

Nedoras:
I don't even know what to say to crap like this anymore. The police here in the States need to be reformed, and their toxic fucking mindset of "we're in this together, it's us vs. them" needs to go away.

There used to be a cop at my old gym, ex-Marine sniper, deployed a few times, now a patrolman. He would often describe being on duty as a warzone, when he's on patrol he's on deployment, and multiple times said he saw no difference between patrolling the suburbs of St. Louis than a patrol in the nomads of Iraq.
That's part of the problem. Soldiers, trained only to kill, often become police, and surprise surprise they're response to a situation is to kill. I think serving in the military should be disqualifying for serving in the police. With the exception of SWAT there is nothing a military background should do to prepare you to write tickets and teach DARE. There should be no overlap between a patrolman and a Marine corps Sniper.
Barney Fife would not have been a better Deputy by being an ex-Navy SEAL.

Yeah, ex-military serving as police officers is a problem when they bring that mindset with them (I agree that they shouldn't be allowed to be cops at all though), but it goes beyond just ex-military. People with no kind of military background what so ever form that mindset. To where they think they're in a war zone, surrounded on all sides. That no matter what, you never "turn" on your comrades in blue. A fellow officer guns down an innocent? Doesn't matter, you stick with them. Your partner opens fire into a public market trying to kill a fleeing suspect? They're doing their job, "civilians" don't understand and you stick by your partner.

These are people playing army when they're barely trained civilians in a uniform they shouldn't even be wearing. A chunk of them barely know how to properly use their weapons, and yet they swing them around carelessly without thought or consequence. And no matter how awful a fellow officer is, they stick with them or risk being a "rat" and an outcast. Large-scale reform is needed nation-wide....and I'm not sure if that will ever come close to happening.

Silentpony:

I remember a few years back when that shooter was loose in Dallas, and the Dallas police chief gave a press conference where he said his #1 priority was the safety of his officers.
And I was shocked. That is not the job of the police. The police put their lives on the line to protect civilians, that's their job. His #1 priority should have been the safety of the public.

It is a very resonable human resources policy though. A wounded or dead police officer can protect no one. I am not a police officer, but I've worked jobs where you regularly operate in a high risk environment where violence aimed at you can sudden erupt, and our first priority was always to keep ourselves as safe as possible. Because if I get incapacitated or killed, it is impossible for me to help anyone else, and someone is going to have to take care of me. With that being said, being as safe as possible is pretty semantic when you're positioning yourself between someone who's in a bout of paranoid psychosis and the person they think want to hurt them. At the end of the day, not taking unnecessary risks "to get the job done" should always be the first priority of anyone in a line of work where they might be the target of violence.

Xprimentyl:
snip

Silentpony:
snip

Apparently neither of you have ever reached, or seen someone reach that 'to the bone' level of exhaustion? Where the brain just sort of goes into autopilot. In my youth I had a housemate who worked double shifts (against labour laws), at night he would come home, have something to eat, check in, then pass out on the couch. Each morning he would have no recollection of even leaving work, let alone everything after that. So yeah, I can see someone in that state getting home, or in this case, almost home, then in their confused state, reacting in shock... add a weapon to that situation, and things get real fucked up.

But here's the kicker: That's not an excuse, that's an explanation.

I don't suggest it to absolve her of guilt, I offer it as an attempt to make sense of this. I actually think it's super important to consider the option because someone in that state should not be driving, operating machinery or in control of a weapon. And if they were in that state, they were an active duty police officer, in or near that state just a short time before. So not only should they be punished, but their senior officer should be punished, and the station house(?) should be investigated to ensure that's not a normal thing. Because the idea that cops might be being stretched past their limits by questionable shift schedules is terrifying. Not only should that not be happening, but someone should be seeing people in these states, and taking action to take them off duty and take their damn weapon away.

All that assumes my theory has any grounds. Though, if she was under the influence of drugs or alcohol I would still call for the same investigation: She was on duty, very recently, in that state. Someone above her should also be going down.

Elijin:
Apparently neither of you have ever reached, or seen someone reach that 'to the bone' level of exhaustion? Where the brain just sort of goes into autopilot. In my youth I had a housemate who worked double shifts (against labour laws), at night he would come home, have something to eat, check in, then pass out on the couch. Each morning he would have no recollection of even leaving work, let alone everything after that. So yeah, I can see someone in that state getting home, or in this case, almost home, then in their confused state, reacting in shock... add a weapon to that situation, and things get real fucked up.

But here's the kicker: That's not an excuse, that's an explanation.

I agree.

It's easy to understand someone addled with exhaustion and/or alcohol, or very distracted with other thoughts making this sort of mistake. I've certainly tried to open the wrong room at a hotel, or gone to the wrong office at work. Especially easy to mistake perhaps in an apartment block where the floors and doors are likely to all look pretty much the same. Then a cop trained to react and perhaps with heightened sense of threat, with a gun, and...

As you say, that's no excuse; prime facie, it's manslaughter at a minimum and the law should take its course. The law exists precisely because even accidental error with severe consequences merits a response. But it is also an understandable, human error.

Let's also bear in mind that if the cop is any normal human being, she must be utterly devastated and she's got to live with that guilt for the rest of her life. The outrage from my perspective is not so much that cops do terrible things by accident, negligence or design, it's that the justice system - and even law enforcement as an organisation - seems to operate to protect them in ways it would not do for the rest of us.

Yeah, but did you hear about that Kaepernick guy? What a lowlife, amirite?

Agema:

The outrage from my perspective is not so much that cops do terrible things by accident, negligence or design, it's that the justice system - and even law enforcement as an organisation - seems to operate to protect them in ways it would not do for the rest of us.

Im inclined to agree. Ultimately, this story wasn't a police shooting. It was essentially someone with a permit to carry a gun, being in an unfit state to carry, reacting to a shock and taking another person's life as a result.

The problem lies in the aftermath, where what is ultimately a pretty horrible accident, is being treated with special consideration due to the fact she's a cop.

Problem is, how do you deal with this sort of thing? I know a lot of people are saying 'immediate arrest, what's this administrative leave nonsense?'. But from an actual realistic point of view, out in the world, police can be targeted, even off duty (obviously not this case), which creates a situation where every shooting involving a police officer needs to be first met with administrative leave to allow time to investigate the situation and determine whether charges should be brought. Otherwise you'd get situations where a cop is immediately arrested for a shooting, only to reveal over the course of investigating that the cop was targeted, and the shooting was self defence. The problem lies in how just about every shooting by a police officer is then found to be a clean/good/justified shooting, because of corruption/bias in the investigation and charging process. For instance, this shooting is at best manslaughter and at worst murder.

What's the bet we find out he stood next to a suspicious looking guy on a bus once or something?

Agema:

Let's also bear in mind that if the cop is any normal human being, she must be utterly devastated and she's got to live with that guilt for the rest of her life. The outrage from my perspective is not so much that cops do terrible things by accident, negligence or design, it's that the justice system - and even law enforcement as an organisation - seems to operate to protect them in ways it would not do for the rest of us.

The man she killed wont be living with any guilt.

I am so beyond done with feeling bad for bad people doing bad things.

I don't care if she was tired, drunk, or whatever the fuck. She IS a cop (needs to be was) and it is HER DUTY TO NOT BE GARBAGE! I don't care what the Supreme Court says, it IS their job to serve and protect the common person from danger and injustice. And it IS their lives that should be put on the line for just society.

We need to stop trying ever so hard to excuse, and yes, excuses is what it is. When you have responsibility over other's lives, you need to be able to NOT SHOOT AN INNOCENT PERSON NO MATTER HOW TIRED YOU ARE!

Saelune:

Agema:

Let's also bear in mind that if the cop is any normal human being, she must be utterly devastated and she's got to live with that guilt for the rest of her life. The outrage from my perspective is not so much that cops do terrible things by accident, negligence or design, it's that the justice system - and even law enforcement as an organisation - seems to operate to protect them in ways it would not do for the rest of us.

The man she killed wont be living with any guilt.

I am so beyond done with feeling bad for bad people doing bad things.

I don't care if she was tired, drunk, or whatever the fuck. She IS a cop (needs to be was) and it is HER DUTY TO NOT BE GARBAGE! I don't care what the Supreme Court says, it IS their job to serve and protect the common person from danger and injustice. And it IS their lives that should be put on the line for just society.

We need to stop trying ever so hard to excuse, and yes, excuses is what it is. When you have responsibility over other's lives, you need to be able to NOT SHOOT AN INNOCENT PERSON NO MATTER HOW TIRED YOU ARE!

It's an excuse if it's being argued that she doesn't deserve to be punished, neither of us are doing that. This is a major problem with people who see the world in such black and white terms. You know what helps shit like this from happening again? Understanding what happens, and why. If you're not interested in understanding a problem, and just want harsh consequences to be dolled out based on outrage, you're just creating future problems, not solving current ones.

Elijin:
If you're not interested in understanding a problem, and just want harsh consequences to be dolled out based on outrage, you're just creating future problems, not solving current ones.

Wanting police to face consequences for killing people does not require a lack of understanding of the problem. US police consistently not facing, and being seen not to face, consequences is a lack part of the problem. This is far from an isolated case.

Gethsemani:

Silentpony:

I remember a few years back when that shooter was loose in Dallas, and the Dallas police chief gave a press conference where he said his #1 priority was the safety of his officers.
And I was shocked. That is not the job of the police. The police put their lives on the line to protect civilians, that's their job. His #1 priority should have been the safety of the public.

It is a very resonable human resources policy though. A wounded or dead police officer can protect no one. I am not a police officer, but I've worked jobs where you regularly operate in a high risk environment where violence aimed at you can sudden erupt, and our first priority was always to keep ourselves as safe as possible. Because if I get incapacitated or killed, it is impossible for me to help anyone else, and someone is going to have to take care of me. With that being said, being as safe as possible is pretty semantic when you're positioning yourself between someone who's in a bout of paranoid psychosis and the person they think want to hurt them. At the end of the day, not taking unnecessary risks "to get the job done" should always be the first priority of anyone in a line of work where they might be the target of violence.

What happens when they prioritize police lives over civilian lives? Like 'Chief, the terrorists have 5 hostages in the church, and they're heavily armed!'
'Well that's too dangerous for us, I'm not risking my officers just for some civis! send in the explosive drones'

That's what they did in Dallas with the sniper. a bomb robot was used to kill him. It feels like we're getting very scarily close to not 'Police lives matter' but 'Only police lives matter'

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