Just a quick question.

So i just came across some old info on how the people in japan acted during the chain disaster (tsunami, earthquake reactor meltdowns and whatever else)a while back that most of the foreigners ran for the hills and the Japanese people were almost tripping over each other to go help anyone who got hurt. Then thought back to the katrina incident how there was riots, looting, and even people shooting those coming to help them. Then i thought about the recent sandy disaster and all the news around it suggests everyone affected was calm, civilized, and helping each other. So I'm curious if anyone who was there would tell me if it is how the news was saying or more like katrina and they are just covering things up? And to everyone else if these type of behaviors are more due to the difference in the religious/countries different cultures that just made people behave differently?

My opinion (may be a bit biased because of the "religious" people i've known) is its a religious factor just the way most religions tend to be is a "do what you can to help others as long as it does't cost you to much".

Why would news stations launch a smear job against people from New Orleans? What would they have to gain?

Tim Scott:
My opinion (may be a bit biased because of the "religious" people i've known) is its a religious factor just the way most religions tend to be is a "do what you can to help others as long as it does't cost you to much".

Japan is a lot less religious (at least in the Western sense) than the US is. And New England is a lot less religious than the Gulf Coast. Your logic doesn't seem to hold up. The less religious areas tended to be more helpful, it seems. Personally I don't think religion actually had anything to do with it, though. It's probably a factor of population density and culture. Japan, for example, has one of the highest population densities of any country in the world, so people are basically forced to be nice and helpful, otherwise there would be a LOT of pissed-off neighbors. The culture in Japan is also decidedly more socialistic than the hyper-capitalistic United States. Similar comparisons can be drawn between New York and New Orleans, which have population densities of 27,000 persons/sq. mile and 2,000 persons/sq. mile, respectively, as well as very different cultures ("New York Pride" versus the idolization of self-sufficiency common through much of the South).

Godavari:

Tim Scott:
My opinion (may be a bit biased because of the "religious" people i've known) is its a religious factor just the way most religions tend to be is a "do what you can to help others as long as it does't cost you to much".

Japan is a lot less religious (at least in the Western sense) than the US is. And New England is a lot less religious than the Gulf Coast. Your logic doesn't seem to hold up. The less religious areas tended to be more helpful, it seems. Personally I don't think religion actually had anything to do with it, though. It's probably a factor of population density and culture. Japan, for example, has one of the highest population densities of any country in the world, so people are basically forced to be nice and helpful, otherwise there would be a LOT of pissed-off neighbors. The culture in Japan is also decidedly more socialistic than the hyper-capitalistic United States. Similar comparisons can be drawn between New York and New Orleans, which have population densities of 27,000 persons/sq. mile and 2,000 persons/sq. mile, respectively, as well as very different cultures ("New York Pride" versus the idolization of self-sufficiency common through much of the South).

I think i might have needed to reword it a bit I had meant that my opinion was the way religion/religious people seem to be is a very self obsessed and nothing is wrong if you say your sorry afterward. Which, at least in the ones i have met, the religious type people tend be laying in wait to stab anyone and everyone in the back to get what they want, and the less religious or even atheist people i have met were typically more generous and willing to help complete strangers out which is why i thought the katrina victims were going off the walls nuts and the U.S. people who were in Japan when the tsunami hit grabbed everything thing they could and went running back to the states. Anyways i was just wondering if it seemed that way to others and if the areas hit by sandy the people were acting like the ones in katrina or more like the Japanese since most of the news i have seen is pointing towards people across all three states were actually helping each other.

Klepto:
Why would news stations launch a smear job against people from New Orleans? What would they have to gain?

It's almost as if racism were a thing. Nah. Can't be.

Polarity27:

Klepto:
Why would news stations launch a smear job against people from New Orleans? What would they have to gain?

It's almost as if racism were a thing. Nah. Can't be.

Remember that we're talking about "Murder City" here. In addition, the response to Katrina was a total clusterfuck (giving more time to criminals to do their thing) while the response to Sandy was by all accounts much more effective.

Not everything is immediately racism. Sometimes, there are other factors in play.

Polarity27:

Klepto:
Why would news stations launch a smear job against people from New Orleans? What would they have to gain?

It's almost as if racism were a thing. Nah. Can't be.

New York, which took a major hit with Hurricane Sandy, isn't even half white. Are you suggesting the Rupert Murdoch and the rest of the major media moguls are racists who use their power to smear other races (or specifically, southern black people, but not Asians or anything else)?

Like someone states New Orleans is one of the most violent cities in the US or at least it was before the hurricane. Another things is preparedness. The North east was prepared for the worst disaster in recent memory rivaling many big snowstorms New Orleans... pfff clusterfuck as someone else already stated.

Also Tsunami's are far different from hurricanes, a earthquake hits people are mostly paralyzed the tsunami hits they are scared to death but it's over besides receding floods and who is gonna steal shit when there is 4 ft flood water rushing past. Hurricanes can center over areas for days and when you know they are coming people have more time to go outside to the shopping areas and break in especially when all the upper scale business districts where actually evacuated like in the case of Katrina. And yes quick aid has something to do with it, I get the feeling Japan can muster up large amounts of aid quicker than the US because the country is very compact the US on the other hand has to have the national guard there days before getting ready before they can be effective and even then I don't think national guard is really allowed to "keep the peace" in those situations unless specifically authorized by the governor.

Klepto:

Polarity27:

Klepto:
Why would news stations launch a smear job against people from New Orleans? What would they have to gain?

It's almost as if racism were a thing. Nah. Can't be.

New York, which took a major hit with Hurricane Sandy, isn't even half white. Are you suggesting the Rupert Murdoch and the rest of the major media moguls are racists who use their power to smear other races (or specifically, southern black people, but not Asians or anything else)?

I'm saying that racism influenced the way Katrina was covered, and the way Katrina victims were perceived. That's not an overt conspiracy, that's "racism is a major part of the society we live in". This isn't really isn't all that bloody revolutionary of a thing to say.

Tim Scott:
So i just came across some old info on how the people in japan acted during the chain disaster (tsunami, earthquake reactor meltdowns and whatever else)a while back that most of the foreigners ran for the hills and the Japanese people were almost tripping over each other to go help anyone who got hurt. Then thought back to the katrina incident how there was riots, looting, and even people shooting those coming to help them. Then i thought about the recent sandy disaster and all the news around it suggests everyone affected was calm, civilized, and helping each other. So I'm curious if anyone who was there would tell me if it is how the news was saying or more like katrina and they are just covering things up? And to everyone else if these type of behaviors are more due to the difference in the religious/countries different cultures that just made people behave differently?

My opinion (may be a bit biased because of the "religious" people i've known) is its a religious factor just the way most religions tend to be is a "do what you can to help others as long as it does't cost you to much".

I think that if you want to compare those two disasters, culture and social conditions are more important. Americans are brought up in a rather paranoid gun culture where they're taught that danger is everywhere, even if it's not. Just yesterday watched something on discovery channel about an auction house. Some lady there always carried a fucking firearm, a deadly murder weapon, in her purse at all times. Why? She had to walk through a parking garage sometimes.

Well, if people have been taught stuff that sends them into a fear-induced psychosis when they have to walk to their car, something's seriously wrong. But as we all know, the gun lobbyists would rather chew their own arm off than admit they're ever wrong.

Japan firstly doesn't have such a paranoid culture and widely available guns leading to massive amounts of violence. So other people are other people, and not a potential risk, a potential rapist, or whatever delusions some gun culture-influence Americans suffer from.

Then of course socio-economic conditions. Many in the US are extremely poor and kept that way too. So if something goes wrong it's very alluring to go out and pillage, to finally get yourself a chance at what you've wanted for such a long time. For as far as I'm aware, Japan doesn't have poverty on any scale near that, so people have far less reason to misbehave in case of a large disruption of order.


And don't underestimate the amount of 'doublethink'-like conditions that goes into American attitudes towards misfortune. Americans hate preparing for such events. Just look at how preventable the damage done by hurricanes Katrina and Sandy was, and how small government conservatism ensured that there was no money for flood protection. But afterwards Americans just love pretending to help those hit hard by their own attitude of disinvestment.

Japan is a pretty well-prepared country on the other hand. Tight building regulations (and fuck whatever entrepreneur claims it's "big government unfairness" that he can't build unsafe buildings that will kill people if an earthquake happens) have ensured that the earthquake, despite its severity, didn't cause so much damage. There were also coastal defenses against storms and tsunamis in place, but there's just nothing you can do about a 30 metre tall wall of water. So whatever happens wasn't a result of Japanese ignorance, but really an unfortunate disaster. It makes a difference if it's really a catastrophy which happened, or a result of disinterest. That also motivates people in different ways.

Tim Scott:
-snip-

Ah, sorry. I misunderstood, then.

Blablahb:
I think that if you want to compare those two disasters, culture and social conditions are more important. Americans are brought up in a rather paranoid gun culture where they're taught that danger is everywhere, even if it's not. Just yesterday watched something on discovery channel about an auction house. Some lady there always carried a fucking firearm, a deadly murder weapon, in her purse at all times. Why? She had to walk through a parking garage sometimes.

Well, if people have been taught stuff that sends them into a fear-induced psychosis when they have to walk to their car, something's seriously wrong. But as we all know, the gun lobbyists would rather chew their own arm off than admit they're ever wrong.

This is beyond absurd. Prove it. Show one bit of reliable evidence besides some freak on the Discovery channel that "Americans" (all 310 million of them) are brought up in a culture of (psychosis educing) fear and paranoia.

Japan firstly doesn't have such a paranoid culture and widely available guns leading to massive amounts of violence. So other people are other people, and not a potential risk, a potential rapist, or whatever delusions some gun culture-influence Americans suffer from.

In Louisiana it is illegal to carry a gun within 1,000 feet of a school (except for cops). For a relatively large city like New Orleans, nearly the its whole territory is a "gun free zone," meaninging only the criminals defend themselves.

Then again, I have no idea what your focus on gun crimes for this issue is? The vast, vast majority of Hurricane Katrina crimes were committed without the use of guns. The OP specifically referred to rioting and looting, which isn't something you even need a gun for.

Then of course socio-economic conditions. Many in the US are extremely poor and kept that way too. So if something goes wrong it's very alluring to go out and pillage, to finally get yourself a chance at what you've wanted for such a long time. For as far as I'm aware, Japan doesn't have poverty on any scale near that, so people have far less reason to misbehave in case of a large disruption of order.

The average Japanese person makes about 3/4ths as much money as the average American. Japan's poverty rate is a monstrous 2% lower than the United State's, though I always doubt transitive poverty ratings since they fail to take into account so many aspects. Bottom line, Japanese people are on average poorer, and there are little to no more impoverished people in America than Japan incentive wise.

And don't underestimate the amount of 'doublethink'-like conditions that goes into American attitudes towards misfortune. Americans hate preparing for such events. Just look at how preventable the damage done by hurricanes Katrina and Sandy was, and how small government conservatism ensured that there was no money for flood protection. But afterwards Americans just love pretending to help those hit hard by their own attitude of disinvestment.

Good of you to make another sweeping intense psychological examination for 310 million people again. And the Army Corps of Engineers were in charge of Katrina's levies, when is that the last time conservatives wanted to cut anything done by the military?

Japan is a pretty well-prepared country on the other hand. Tight building regulations (and fuck whatever entrepreneur claims it's "big government unfairness" that he can't build unsafe buildings that will kill people if an earthquake happens) have ensured that the earthquake, despite its severity, didn't cause so much damage.

Dammit, there goes the lucrative "collapsing billion dollar building" private market which would surely flourish in the absence of our benevolent angel bureaucrats.

Blablahb:

Tim Scott:
So i just came across some old info on how the people in japan acted during the chain disaster (tsunami, earthquake reactor meltdowns and whatever else)a while back that most of the foreigners ran for the hills and the Japanese people were almost tripping over each other to go help anyone who got hurt. Then thought back to the katrina incident how there was riots, looting, and even people shooting those coming to help them. Then i thought about the recent sandy disaster and all the news around it suggests everyone affected was calm, civilized, and helping each other. So I'm curious if anyone who was there would tell me if it is how the news was saying or more like katrina and they are just covering things up? And to everyone else if these type of behaviors are more due to the difference in the religious/countries different cultures that just made people behave differently?

My opinion (may be a bit biased because of the "religious" people i've known) is its a religious factor just the way most religions tend to be is a "do what you can to help others as long as it does't cost you to much".

I think that if you want to compare those two disasters, culture and social conditions are more important. Americans are brought up in a rather paranoid gun culture where they're taught that danger is everywhere, even if it's not. Just yesterday watched something on discovery channel about an auction house. Some lady there always carried a fucking firearm, a deadly murder weapon, in her purse at all times. Why? She had to walk through a parking garage sometimes.

Well, if people have been taught stuff that sends them into a fear-induced psychosis when they have to walk to their car, something's seriously wrong. But as we all know, the gun lobbyists would rather chew their own arm off than admit they're ever wrong.

Japan firstly doesn't have such a paranoid culture and widely available guns leading to massive amounts of violence. So other people are other people, and not a potential risk, a potential rapist, or whatever delusions some gun culture-influence Americans suffer from.

Then of course socio-economic conditions. Many in the US are extremely poor and kept that way too. So if something goes wrong it's very alluring to go out and pillage, to finally get yourself a chance at what you've wanted for such a long time. For as far as I'm aware, Japan doesn't have poverty on any scale near that, so people have far less reason to misbehave in case of a large disruption of order.


And don't underestimate the amount of 'doublethink'-like conditions that goes into American attitudes towards misfortune. Americans hate preparing for such events. Just look at how preventable the damage done by hurricanes Katrina and Sandy was, and how small government conservatism ensured that there was no money for flood protection. But afterwards Americans just love pretending to help those hit hard by their own attitude of disinvestment.

Japan is a pretty well-prepared country on the other hand. Tight building regulations (and fuck whatever entrepreneur claims it's "big government unfairness" that he can't build unsafe buildings that will kill people if an earthquake happens) have ensured that the earthquake, despite its severity, didn't cause so much damage. There were also coastal defenses against storms and tsunamis in place, but there's just nothing you can do about a 30 metre tall wall of water. So whatever happens wasn't a result of Japanese ignorance, but really an unfortunate disaster. It makes a difference if it's really a catastrophy which happened, or a result of disinterest. That also motivates people in different ways.

The Japanese government didn't handle the nuke disaster very well. For a long time they just lied about how serious it was, and they are still unclear about the amount of radiation released.

Klepto:

Blablahb:
I think that if you want to compare those two disasters, culture and social conditions are more important. Americans are brought up in a rather paranoid gun culture where they're taught that danger is everywhere, even if it's not. Just yesterday watched something on discovery channel about an auction house. Some lady there always carried a fucking firearm, a deadly murder weapon, in her purse at all times. Why? She had to walk through a parking garage sometimes.

Well, if people have been taught stuff that sends them into a fear-induced psychosis when they have to walk to their car, something's seriously wrong. But as we all know, the gun lobbyists would rather chew their own arm off than admit they're ever wrong.

This is beyond absurd. Prove it. Show one bit of reliable evidence besides some freak on the Discovery channel that "Americans" (all 310 million of them) are brought up in a culture of (psychosis educing) fear and paranoia.

Japan firstly doesn't have such a paranoid culture and widely available guns leading to massive amounts of violence. So other people are other people, and not a potential risk, a potential rapist, or whatever delusions some gun culture-influence Americans suffer from.

In Louisiana it is illegal to carry a gun within 1,000 feet of a school (except for cops). For a relatively large city like New Orleans, nearly the its whole territory is a "gun free zone," meaninging only the criminals defend themselves.

Then again, I have no idea what your focus on gun crimes for this issue is? The vast, vast majority of Hurricane Katrina crimes were committed without the use of guns. The OP specifically referred to rioting and looting, which isn't something you even need a gun for.

Then of course socio-economic conditions. Many in the US are extremely poor and kept that way too. So if something goes wrong it's very alluring to go out and pillage, to finally get yourself a chance at what you've wanted for such a long time. For as far as I'm aware, Japan doesn't have poverty on any scale near that, so people have far less reason to misbehave in case of a large disruption of order.

The average Japanese person makes about 3/4ths as much money as the average American. Japan's poverty rate is a monstrous 2% lower than the United State's, though I always doubt transitive poverty ratings since they fail to take into account so many aspects. Bottom line, Japanese people are on average poorer, and there are little to no more impoverished people in America than Japan incentive wise.

And don't underestimate the amount of 'doublethink'-like conditions that goes into American attitudes towards misfortune. Americans hate preparing for such events. Just look at how preventable the damage done by hurricanes Katrina and Sandy was, and how small government conservatism ensured that there was no money for flood protection. But afterwards Americans just love pretending to help those hit hard by their own attitude of disinvestment.

Good of you to make another sweeping intense psychological examination for 310 million people again. And the Army Corps of Engineers were in charge of Katrina's levies, when is that the last time conservatives wanted to cut anything done by the military?

Japan is a pretty well-prepared country on the other hand. Tight building regulations (and fuck whatever entrepreneur claims it's "big government unfairness" that he can't build unsafe buildings that will kill people if an earthquake happens) have ensured that the earthquake, despite its severity, didn't cause so much damage.

Dammit, there goes the lucrative "collapsing billion dollar building" private market which would surely flourish in the absence of our benevolent angel bureaucrats.

Average income in Japan (60,000$) is much higher than the average income for the U.S. (40,000$). Also, the poverty rate is much lower in Japan than in the U.S. Your facts seem to be off here.

Leadfinger:

Klepto:

Blablahb:
I think that if you want to compare those two disasters, culture and social conditions are more important. Americans are brought up in a rather paranoid gun culture where they're taught that danger is everywhere, even if it's not. Just yesterday watched something on discovery channel about an auction house. Some lady there always carried a fucking firearm, a deadly murder weapon, in her purse at all times. Why? She had to walk through a parking garage sometimes.

Well, if people have been taught stuff that sends them into a fear-induced psychosis when they have to walk to their car, something's seriously wrong. But as we all know, the gun lobbyists would rather chew their own arm off than admit they're ever wrong.

This is beyond absurd. Prove it. Show one bit of reliable evidence besides some freak on the Discovery channel that "Americans" (all 310 million of them) are brought up in a culture of (psychosis educing) fear and paranoia.

Japan firstly doesn't have such a paranoid culture and widely available guns leading to massive amounts of violence. So other people are other people, and not a potential risk, a potential rapist, or whatever delusions some gun culture-influence Americans suffer from.

In Louisiana it is illegal to carry a gun within 1,000 feet of a school (except for cops). For a relatively large city like New Orleans, nearly the its whole territory is a "gun free zone," meaninging only the criminals defend themselves.

Then again, I have no idea what your focus on gun crimes for this issue is? The vast, vast majority of Hurricane Katrina crimes were committed without the use of guns. The OP specifically referred to rioting and looting, which isn't something you even need a gun for.

Then of course socio-economic conditions. Many in the US are extremely poor and kept that way too. So if something goes wrong it's very alluring to go out and pillage, to finally get yourself a chance at what you've wanted for such a long time. For as far as I'm aware, Japan doesn't have poverty on any scale near that, so people have far less reason to misbehave in case of a large disruption of order.

The average Japanese person makes about 3/4ths as much money as the average American. Japan's poverty rate is a monstrous 2% lower than the United State's, though I always doubt transitive poverty ratings since they fail to take into account so many aspects. Bottom line, Japanese people are on average poorer, and there are little to no more impoverished people in America than Japan incentive wise.

And don't underestimate the amount of 'doublethink'-like conditions that goes into American attitudes towards misfortune. Americans hate preparing for such events. Just look at how preventable the damage done by hurricanes Katrina and Sandy was, and how small government conservatism ensured that there was no money for flood protection. But afterwards Americans just love pretending to help those hit hard by their own attitude of disinvestment.

Good of you to make another sweeping intense psychological examination for 310 million people again. And the Army Corps of Engineers were in charge of Katrina's levies, when is that the last time conservatives wanted to cut anything done by the military?

Japan is a pretty well-prepared country on the other hand. Tight building regulations (and fuck whatever entrepreneur claims it's "big government unfairness" that he can't build unsafe buildings that will kill people if an earthquake happens) have ensured that the earthquake, despite its severity, didn't cause so much damage.

Dammit, there goes the lucrative "collapsing billion dollar building" private market which would surely flourish in the absence of our benevolent angel bureaucrats.

Average income in Japan (60,000$) is much higher than the average income for the U.S. (40,000$). Also, the poverty rate is much lower in Japan than in the U.S. Your facts seem to be off here.

Sources?

EDIT:
US average income was about 50K in 2006 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Household_income_in_the_United_States)

Japan average income was was than 30K in 2005(http://www.worldsalaries.org/japan.shtml)

Although the stats are a few years old, presumably they haven't changed much.

Poverty stats - http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/22/world/asia/22poverty.html

Klepto:

Blablahb:
I think that if you want to compare those two disasters, culture and social conditions are more important. Americans are brought up in a rather paranoid gun culture where they're taught that danger is everywhere, even if it's not. Just yesterday watched something on discovery channel about an auction house. Some lady there always carried a fucking firearm, a deadly murder weapon, in her purse at all times. Why? She had to walk through a parking garage sometimes.

Well, if people have been taught stuff that sends them into a fear-induced psychosis when they have to walk to their car, something's seriously wrong. But as we all know, the gun lobbyists would rather chew their own arm off than admit they're ever wrong.

This is beyond absurd. Prove it. Show one bit of reliable evidence besides some freak on the Discovery channel that "Americans" (all 310 million of them) are brought up in a culture of (psychosis educing) fear and paranoia.

I don't know about comparing this to other countries, but it is pretty evident that in the US, people are quite afraid of crime. We have two or three channels that devote significant programming time to shows about women getting raped by home invaders. We HAVE A TON OF GUNS which many people claim are for protection. Our possessions are locked down. Our doors are bolted. Denying this or the notion that our culture reifies the idea of other-as-danger or outside-as-dangerous is just being tone deaf.

Then of course socio-economic conditions. Many in the US are extremely poor and kept that way too. So if something goes wrong it's very alluring to go out and pillage, to finally get yourself a chance at what you've wanted for such a long time. For as far as I'm aware, Japan doesn't have poverty on any scale near that, so people have far less reason to misbehave in case of a large disruption of order.

The average Japanese person makes about 3/4ths as much money as the average American. Japan's poverty rate is a monstrous 2% lower than the United State's, though I always doubt transitive poverty ratings since they fail to take into account so many aspects. Bottom line, Japanese people are on average poorer, and there are little to no more impoverished people in America than Japan incentive wise.

Yes, comparing income in two different countries is certainly the best way to determine how well-off people are. Have you ever been outside the USA? Go to Thailand and tell me how poor someone making 3/4 of US income is over there. Sure, goods in Japan are more expensive (in metropolitan areas) than in Thailand. Then go to Sweden and tell me how poor someone making 3/4 US income is. It's about the level of social services provided and, in addition, the relative flatness of income levels across the board.

And don't underestimate the amount of 'doublethink'-like conditions that goes into American attitudes towards misfortune. Americans hate preparing for such events. Just look at how preventable the damage done by hurricanes Katrina and Sandy was, and how small government conservatism ensured that there was no money for flood protection. But afterwards Americans just love pretending to help those hit hard by their own attitude of disinvestment.

Good of you to make another sweeping intense psychological examination for 310 million people again. And the Army Corps of Engineers were in charge of Katrina's levies, when is that the last time conservatives wanted to cut anything done by the military?

Your tone suggests that your question isn't sincere, but rather an implication that conservatives don't believe in cutting funding to the Army Corps of Engineers. Well, you're wrong. See:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/28/opinion/the-storm-again.html?_r=0&hp=&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1355429972-fOp4dHFEHM6xu7pITLbqKQ
http://www.downsizinggovernment.org/usace

Japan is a pretty well-prepared country on the other hand. Tight building regulations (and fuck whatever entrepreneur claims it's "big government unfairness" that he can't build unsafe buildings that will kill people if an earthquake happens) have ensured that the earthquake, despite its severity, didn't cause so much damage.

Dammit, there goes the lucrative "collapsing billion dollar building" private market which would surely flourish in the absence of our benevolent angel bureaucrats.

[/quote]
What?

Klepto:

The average Japanese person makes about 3/4ths as much money as the average American. Japan's poverty rate is a monstrous 2% lower than the United State's, though I always doubt transitive poverty ratings since they fail to take into account so many aspects.

You have to take into account what a dollar is worth in each country though. Average UK income is about $30K, much lower than the US average but how far it takes you is very important. A dollar in Dallas will get you further than in New York, different areas have different prices. The same is true of countries, I've seen people say that the UK is shockingly good what you get for your money compared to prices stateside (though the same's probably true in reverse).

So while Japan may take home less in a straight conversion of average wages, how far that wage goes can be very important.

Dammit, there goes the lucrative "collapsing billion dollar building" private market which would surely flourish in the absence of our benevolent angel bureaucrats.

Japan is insane for the level of regulation their construction companies have to comply with (with very good reason), how much do you think that costs companies every year? It'll be in the 10's of millions probably.

Imagine tomorrow there's no regulation. How many companies are still going to follow all the old rules 'just because'? Most will at least drop a good chunk of those rules to lower costs. Nobody follows a rule they don't have to, especially when theirs profits at stake.

All of the numbers on relative income levels I have cited were price adjusted. Even if the figures weren't price adjusted, that would certainly be to my point's advantage as the US has notoriously low prices on most goods compared the rest of the Western world (property, energy, food, electronics, etc). The average US citizen is actually just far wealthier than an average citizen of almost anywhere else in the world. There are only a handful of countries which match or surpass the US on this index, and most of them are extremely small.

ratzofftoya:

Klepto:

I don't know about comparing this to other countries, but it is pretty evident that in the US, people are quite afraid of crime. We have two or three channels that devote significant programming time to shows about women getting raped by home invaders. We HAVE A TON OF GUNS which many people claim are for protection. Our possessions are locked down. Our doors are bolted. Denying this or the notion that our culture reifies the idea of other-as-danger or outside-as-dangerous is just being tone deaf.

There is a major difference between "psychosis-educing" paranoia, and cautious safety for one's own well-being. The US's general respect for protection is well known, but the psychoanalytical jump from "seeks protection" to "paranoid nutcase" to "more likely to loot during a disaster" is completely unfounded.

Your tone suggests that your question isn't sincere, but rather an implication that conservatives don't believe in cutting funding to the Army Corps of Engineers. Well, you're wrong. See:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/28/opinion/the-storm-again.html?_r=0&hp=&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1355429972-fOp4dHFEHM6xu7pITLbqKQ
http://www.downsizinggovernment.org/usace

Fair enough, but the articles you posted both refer to post-Katrina. The second one especially does a good job of showing just how incompetent and misused the ACoE is as a "pork-barrel" machine.

[quote="Karma168" post="528.396000.16110408"]
[quote]
Imagine tomorrow there's no regulation. How many companies are still going to follow all the old rules 'just because'? Most will at least drop a good chunk of those rules to lower costs. Nobody follows a rule they don't have to, especially when theirs profits at stake.

I don't see the benefit of a company building at risk for collapse given the potential financial and legal ramifications of shotty workmanship leading to deaths.

 

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