Are you still in the faith you were raised in?
Yes
31.3% (30)
31.3% (30)
No
68.8% (66)
68.8% (66)
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Poll: How Did You Get To Where You Are With Faith?

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How did you get to where you are with faith? Diests and non-diests alike. I'm rather curious. I'm a naturalistic humanist that before coming to that conclusion taught Catholic Sunday School. Started pulling at threads at 15 or 16 and my faith unraveled. I'd probably be ignorant and in your face as an Atheist if I didn't also discover Bad Religion about this time. It taught me I could be articulate about my doubts. What about you folks?

Poindexter:
I'd probably be ignorant and in your face as an Atheist...

Well, that's not an offensive generalisation in the slightest, incidently I was under the impression that an Atheist and a Humanist are pretty much the same thing.

On-Topic, I was raised in an non-religious household, though my grandparents imparted some Christianity on me. By about nine years old though I decided there wasn't much reason to believe in religion and so I stopped believing, that's pretty much it.

I wasn't raised in any religion, and I don't have one now. That's not to say that I never had one. For the larger part of 2012 I called myself Christian. I renounced that during the later part of the summer.

JoJo:

Poindexter:
I'd probably be ignorant and in your face as an Atheist...

Well, that's not an offensive generalisation in the slightest, incidently I was under the impression that an Atheist and a Humanist are pretty much the same thing.

On-Topic, I was raised in an non-religious household, though my grandparents imparted some Christianity on me. By about nine years old though I decided there wasn't much reason to believe in religion and so I stopped believing, that's pretty much it.

Since the OP is generalising; Humanists are just Hipster-atheists, they know exactly what they are, but being an atheist is, like, soooo mainstream.

It's complicated.

My family was never religious, but we have a lot of christian values and things like that.

I was basically taught to live how a god would want somebody to live. Accept people for who they are, try to lend a helping hand if you can, and most importantly manners.

So if there is a word or anything for a faith like that, then I guess I'm one.

A weird amalgam of humanist and Buddhist. I was raised without much religious influence, though there was some in the form of Scouts and living in the South in general. Kinda just formed my own views over time, at 12-13 I was a semi-Christian who believed in reincarnation for all but the truly good and the truly good, who would go to their respective afterlives for a long, if temporary, stay then recycled back into the cycle(guess what influenced me to conver to Buddhism =P). Then I became a straight atheist with anti-theist tendencies, then I started studying Buddhism and realized that it kinda lined up with what I already believed and converted. So yeah, kinda weird progression and I still don't fully believe in the metaphysical aspects of buddhism, but hell there isn't much a requirement for that.

I sincerely hope the OP just phrased that incredibly badly.

JoJo:

Poindexter:
I'd probably be ignorant and in your face as an Atheist...

Well, that's not an offensive generalisation in the slightest, incidently I was under the impression that an Atheist and a Humanist are pretty much the same thing.

Well... Humanism (with a capital H) is secular humanism. Which is atheistic, non-spiritual and non-superstitious. In other words totally naturalistic philosophy centred around helping human beings / general society in some way shape or form, often education seems to be the focus.
It is an entire philosophy on its own, and encompasses so much more than the simple answer to "Do you believe in any deities?".

That said if referring purely to religious persuasion, you would be right ^.^

Moving on: atheism is a by-definition prerequisite of Humanism (capital H, for secular? Stay with me people!), so the OP is a bit... well... yeah... awfully written and ironically enough, ignorant of the things he speaks of -.- Marvellous :D

Skeleon:

I sincerely hope the OP just phrased that incredibly badly.

I fear to see what it might say if he phrased it as intended >.<

JoJo:
[quote="Poindexter" post="528.398073.16268812"] I'd probably be ignorant and in your face as an Atheist...

Well, that's not an offensive generalisation in the slightest, incidently I was under the impression that an Atheist and a Humanist are pretty much the same thing.

I wasn't so much making a generalization as admitting that a solid portion of non-deists are equally as bad as the fanatics in deistic faiths.Its one of those semantics. I personally don't like to bill to myself as an atheist as I feel that 9/10 people that say they are atheists are on the first fumbling steps of non-deism. I like to dress it up a bit. Thats me personally though.

Brandon237:

JoJo:

Poindexter:
I'd probably be ignorant and in your face as an Atheist...

Well, that's not an offensive generalisation in the slightest, incidently I was under the impression that an Atheist and a Humanist are pretty much the same thing.

Well... Humanism (with a capital H) is secular humanism. Which is atheistic, non-spiritual and non-superstitious. In other words totally naturalistic philosophy centred around helping human beings / general society in some way shape or form, often education seems to be the focus.
It is an entire philosophy on its own, and encompasses so much more than the simple answer to "Do you believe in any deities?".

That said if referring purely to religious persuasion, you would be right ^.^

Moving on: atheism is a by-definition prerequisite of Humanism (capital H, for secular? Stay with me people!), so the OP is a bit... well... yeah... awfully written and ironically enough, ignorant of the things he speaks of -.- Marvellous :D

Skeleon:

I sincerely hope the OP just phrased that incredibly badly.

I fear to see what it might say if he phrased it as intended >.<

Badly phrased. Thanks for catching my slip

Started out Christian and eventually wandered to atheism due to wanting to reject my religious upbringing. I stayed as an atheist for years before coming to the realization as to exactly how much it sucks having no afterlife. I did a lot of searching and eventually ended up as a sort of agnostic/deist. Nobody has any proof of what happens after death and what's out there, so we should just sit back and enjoy the ride and find out when we get there--that is my philosophy.

Since the OP is generalising; Humanists are just Hipster-atheists, they know exactly what they are, but being an atheist is, like, soooo mainstream.[/quote]

That sentence made my day. Thank you.

Poindexter:

Badly phrased. Thanks for catching my slip

'Tis a pleasure ^^
Although the OP is still a bit weird... If you are a deist just say that, naturalistic humanist is also a strange term though, if you are an atheist that follows the idea of humanism, just say Humanist, if you are a deist, say deist but philosophically you hold humanist values ^.^
At the end of the day, your religious persuasion (theist, deist, atheist et cetera) is only part of your overall philosophy (humanism, objectivism et cetera).

Brandon237:

Poindexter:

Badly phrased. Thanks for catching my slip

'Tis a pleasure ^^
Although the OP is still a bit weird... If you are a deist just say that, naturalistic humanist is also a strange term though, if you are an atheist that follows the idea of humanism, just say Humanist, if you are a deist, say deist but philosophically you hold humanist values ^.^
At the end of the day, your religious persuasion (theist, deist, atheist et cetera) is only part of your overall philosophy (humanism, objectivism et cetera).

I place all blame for my convoluted phrasing on Greg Graffin and his books and papers.

Apathetic Agnostic (Apatheist). Was raised Salvation Army, or as I like to call them The Rhythm Methodists, but in my early teens I came to the conclusion that it's all irrelevent.

The reason Apatheists don't like being lumped in with Atheists is because it makes it sound like we give a shit either way.

Time, study, and my good old friend logic. To be brief, I'll discuss my falling from Catholicism, the religion of my family. Now, I'd always been kind of a believer up till my parents decided to send me to a catholic school. My lack of understanding of what my own claimed religion was the reason I believed. As I steadily learned more and more of the rules and nonsense that are enforced by choice, it all just seemed like unnecessary ritual. So I fell from my religion and became non-denominational. As I went along, I learned more about science, how the world works, and decided that a creator isn't all that necessary. The final nail in the coffin was when I stripped the mystery from the resurrection story. God sent himself to Earth to sacrifice himself to himself so that he might be able to forgive sins? This sounds like the kind of convoluted plan a bond villain would come up with, let a lone a perfect being.

Ultimately, the hardest thing was accepting that I would die, there was nothing I could do about it, and that was likely the end of my existence. That was a really scary thought the first time I had it. Now I'm pretty fine with it. Immortality, is, after all, ultimately boring. What limited meaning our lives might have would be utterly negated if we didn't die.

Poindexter:

I place all blame for my convoluted phrasing on Greg Graffin and his books and papers.

Yeah, my vocabulary was much improved by him and Mr. Brett. Susurrations? That's a word so obscure, my spell checker doesn't believe it.

I wasn't really brought up in any faith, but I was brainwashed by my fucking school of all places into Christianity (whereas my mum just didn't really say anything at all on the subject of religion), but I managed to drop that in my teens. I am still pissed off that my school brainwashes children though.
Absolutely disguisting.

It's a very touchy subject with me. My whole life, I've been raised by my mom who is an extremely fundamentalist Christian, so I accepted that for most of my life. But very recently I've started questioning almost every belief I was taught is right. I mainly credit becoming more active on the Escapist for helping me to do so, as a large part of the reason for my growing skepticism comes from reading debates on this site.

I don't think I could even consider myself a Christian anymore, though, if for no other reason than I carry some beliefs that are directly opposed to Christian values (marriage equality, pro-choice, evolution, etc.). Worst part is, I have no one I can tell because a large number of my family and friends are fundamentalists. I'd probably be crucified for admitting I don't entirely agree with their faith. I recently bring The God Delusion into my school (I attend a Christian school) and read it during the day, and I was rewarded by one of my friends reading the book jacket while laughing, another friend asking me "That book isn't going to make you an atheist, is it?", and my teacher spending the rest of the period in silence. The following day, the two friends spent a half an hour mocking evolution and atheism, and any attempt of mine to rebut them was met by some variation of the phrase "But the Bible, therefore evolution is false".

In short, I was brought up in a Christian home, attend a Christian school, and have quite a few Christian friends, but I'm not a Christian.

I started having doubts, noticing the objections of prominent people of faith nationally and in my life to things that should not have been objected to: reason, logic, evidence, science, etc., and it got me to really dive deep and question things. After a year of research, half of which I went through as an agnostic, I realized that label was dishonest and that I just no longer believed.

I was raised Ukrainian-Orthodox, but my father became a "born-again christian". I stayed othodox even though he tried to convince me otherwise. My philosophy is god wants you to enjoy life. All will be forgiven when you die as long as you tried to live a good life (i.e. following your morals and doing what you think is right). Oh and being Uke-Orhodox means I also get lots of cool traditions, plus the priest in my parish is basically Santa Claus.

Born and raised Christian, and always have and will be one. I can honestly say I see a big difference in people between those who know Christ and those who don't. Argue with me all you want, its not going to change anything.

Poindexter:

I wasn't so much making a generalization

Wrong move. Thing is, the word "generalization" is used to describe exactly the sort of phrase that "ignorant and in your face as an Atheist" is. It was a generalization, and though it may have been an honest and non-malicious mistake, the proper thing to do is apologize for it, not to deny it.

RhombusHatesYou:
Apathetic Agnostic (Apatheist). Was raised Salvation Army, or as I like to call them The Rhythm Methodists, but in my early teens I came to the conclusion that it's all irrelevent.

The reason Apatheists don't like being lumped in with Atheists is because it makes it sound like we give a shit either way.

"Apatheist"? Yes, I like that. That pretty much sums up my religious outlook, too.

I started as a generic Christian, not really conforming to any of the specific sects of Christianity, but still believing in God, Jesus, and so forth. I wasn't ever really serious about my religion, and I guess you could say one day I just decided to stop pretending to believe in something I really didn't believe in. I only believed in it to begin with because society said I should.

I started out going to Unitarian churches with my family, but we all got tired of it pretty quickly. No one in my family was very serious about religion. As I became a teenager, I was pretty much an atheist (but claimed to be agnostic). Many classes I had taken had exposed me to the numerous atrocities committed in the name of a certain religion. As I grew up, I learned that every group has it's share of nutjobs, and that religion can be used for good as well.

Recently, I read a fun book, called "A Year of Living Biblically" by A.J. Jacobs. It was about an agnostic writer from New York, who decided to spend a full year living according to every rule in the Bible, so that he could write an interesting book about it. Until then, I had always thought of religion as a crutch for those who cannot face the real world, but through reading this book, I learned that it can also teach you discipline. A.J. had to spend an entire year refraining from lies, gossip, and other things, but most importantly, he had to learn to give thanks. As a result, he learned just how many good things were happening in his life. Altogether, it made him happier and a better person.

I won't fault people for believing in a God, but I'm not sure I could make that leap. Still, this book has left me wondering if you can still reap the Bible's benefits without forsaking your current worldview.

I dunno what you would consider the faith I was "raised in". We went to church (Catholic) every Sunday and eventually turned to Easter and Christmas, then turned to not at all (and I ended up "becoming" atheist some point in there). Besides that, nothing religious really played any part in our family or lives. When I started to think about if it was real or not, seemed more illogical than not, and I saw myself as an atheist. Actually became a Christian less than two weeks a go through a long chain of events.

It was a witch

No, wait, it was a wizard

Warlock? Soothsayer? Seer?

No, I'm not the same as I was raised in. I just hated the everloving balls out of church and moved from there.

To quote George in Dead Like Me:

When I was little my mom told me Santa Claus didn't exist, neither did the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy or the Great Pumpkin. Even though she didn't say so specifically, I just sort of assumed that God didn't either.

Actually I was raised in a family that was pretty apathetic towards religion, but I went to a Church of England school and therefore was Protestant up until the age of about 11 or 12. My secondary school wasn't as militant about the whole religion thing beyond occasional prayers and hymns on occasion, and once I got away from being made to say Grace and the Lord's Prayer every day I just sort of did away with the God thing.

That's not to say that primary school was all fire and brimstone. From what I can remember they mainly just taught us things about being nice to people, being thankful for what you have, giving to charity and helping those less fortunate than yourself etc.

Anyway, when I got older I started identifying as agnostic in a "I can't possibly know for sure so why stress about it?" way. Then when I got a little older than that I decided for sure that organised religion definitely wasn't something I would ever be interested in.

Now I'm an atheist. When it comes to religion, I think people should be free to practice and believe in whatever they like, so long as they don't take it to the point of trying to infringe on other people's happiness or freedom.

Poindexter:
How did you get to where you are with faith? Diests and non-diests alike. I'm rather curious. I'm a naturalistic humanist that before coming to that conclusion taught Catholic Sunday School. Started pulling at threads at 15 or 16 and my faith unraveled. I'd probably be ignorant and in your face as an Atheist if I didn't also discover Bad Religion about this time. It taught me I could be articulate about my doubts. What about you folks?

First of all, Bad Religion is amazing. Still my favourite band for the last 15 years even if I dont listen to them as much anymore.
Second, I was raised a secular Jew, my parents were raised as secular Jews, and so were my grandparents. The Holocaust did wonders in my ancestors losing their faith in God but creating a strong feeling of Jewish identity based on self-defense ideals. The Nazis did not care if you believed in God or not, they cared about your blood. As such, my lack of a belief in God does not protect me from antisemites at the end of the day.

To put it simply I became more Liberal in my interpretation of Christianity. I was raised in a fairly conservative sect and as I got older I learned more about Science, different world views, and about Christianity itself and it helped me see the faith from a different angle that I liked. Nothing all to dramatic.

Raised in a strongly Atheist household and moved on to Paganism after a bit of life experience.

I was raised Catholic (tho never baptized) and attended Catholic school for 7 years.

I found myself questioning things the older I got, especially whilse still in school, so I started researching Catholicism further, which lead me to researching other religions.

Years later, I've found that while I'm philosophical in my beliefs, I'm not religious, so I consider myself agnostic. I don't believe in any one God or Goddess, but I don't wish to deny anyone ELSE their beliefs (even when those beliefs go against how I live).

I was raised in a rather devout catholic house and went to church and sunday school routinely. and i rather enjoyed it for th most part. I think there's a power above and even if its for selfish or dumb reasons, its something I allow myself ot believe in. It doesnt stop me from looking at the rest of the world, seeing evolution as true, no reason homosexuals cant be married in a church, all that stuff people like to say religion prohibits or retards. and i dont go door to door and actigvely try to make people a christain (though I did have an atheist friend convert after she liked the experience, but that was her choice after only going ot hruch with me once).

So yeah, thats where im at, probably where I'll stay, and if my kids (should I have any) want to follow the path thats fine. I dont really care what a person does as long as they're not a complete and total asshole about it.

Magichead:

Since the OP is generalising; Humanists are just Hipster-atheists, they know exactly what they are, but being an atheist is, like, soooo mainstream.

I'm not so sure about that. Have you seen the average Secular Humanist?

image

I mean, look at how cheesy this video is!

(And I say that as a registered member of the British Humanist Association)

Seriously though, there's a lot of famous Secular Humanists. It's like positive atheism, for when simple amorality and naturalism isn't enough. It can even adopt an inter-faith role due to shared concerns.

I was raised without religion (to my mother's chagrin) and I feel no need for it. I've always been on the side that believe everything is caused by a person or myself. If I mess up, it's not fate, it's not some divine plan, I made a mistake.

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